Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Medieval burial shows love that outlasts death

Two skeletons in a grave in Romania have been found buried together holding hands. The skeletons were probably buried between 1450 and 1550.

North Yorkshire claims Richard III

"Why should we trust them? They misplaced him for 500 years," says Conservative Councillor Tom Fox of the Scarborough Borough Council about his objection to Richard III's burial in Leicester, England. (video)

Hunt to find Boudicca

The latest subject of interest for royal remains hunters is Boudicca, the warrior queen, who fought the Romans to defend Britain, who may lie beneath a Birmingham McDonalds or platform eight, nine or 10 at King's Cross Station.

Does Sudeley Castle conceal Roman ruins?

The recent discovery of a Roman column and the discovery last year of a stone relief of Roman god Cunomaglos have archaeologists calling for an investigation of Sudeley Castle in Winchcombe, England. Experts believe the castle may conceal a temple and a villa.

Unidentified Winchester bones could be exhumed for testing

The recent discovery of the remains of Richard III have led experts to wonder if an unmarked grave in Winchester, England might hold the bones of King Alfred the Great.

Cyber-archaeology in Petra

In its March 2013 issue, Antiquity Magazine reports on a partnership of several universities and organizations to use the latest developments in computer science and engineering to analyze archaeological sites. In this instance, they focus on the UNESCO World Heritage, Petra Archaeological Park.

Hadrian's Wall: Exciting New Aerial Photographs

Aerial photographs are rewriting the history of Hadrian's Wall. Images indicate there were hundreds - even thousands - of Iron Age settlements there long before the Romans. (photos, video)

London excavation yields wealth of Roman artifacts

Excavations at the former site of the Temple of Mithras in London, England have yielded over 10,000 artifacts, many in a remarkable state of preservation. The finds include a shoe, jewelery, documents, and table wares.

Heraldic badge found at Scottish battlefield

A heraldic badge showing the Scottish crown has been found at the site of the Battle of Flodden. The badge may have been worn by someone closely affiliated with King James IV.

Portrait of a wealthy Roman

After nearly 2000 years, a wealthy Roman citizen whose remains were discovered 18 years ago in Caerleon, near Newport, Wales, has a face. (portrait)

Remarkable Roman Finds in London

Eight photos from London's "deepest" Roman dig include leather goods, tableware, a horse pendant and amber.

Avebury ranks second in world heritage sites

The "quiet, bucolic setting, the lack of crowds and the ability to wander freely" has won Avebury's stone circle in Wiltshire, England a second place among best world heritage sites by Which? travel magazine.

Roman "industrial complex" found in Wales

"We have a remarkably well-preserved Roman road in good condition and the site is throwing up all manner of interesting things including a lot of lead, which suggests it was connected with the lead workings on Halkyn Mountain," said Will Walker, of Earthworks Archaeology about the discovery of a Roman site near Flint, Wales.

"Princes in the Tower" to remain unidentified - for now

Shakespeare wrote that Richard III plotted the deaths of his young nephews in the Tower of London, a theory touted by the Tudors but never confirmed. In the 17th century, the bones of two young children were found in the Tower and were reburied in Westminster Abbey as the princes, Edward V and Richard Duke of York.

Remains of Teutonic knights identified in Poland

The remains of three medieval Grand Masters of the Teutonic Knights, unearthed in Poland in 2007, have been identified. The men were named Werner von Orseln, Ludolf Koenig, and Heinrich von Plauen.

Tempers flare over Byzantine archaeological dig

The municipal council of Thessaloniki, Macedonia is listening to arguments between executives of the construction company rebuilding the Venizelos metro station and archaeologists working on the "very significant Byzantine antiquities" discovered during construction about whether to remove the artifacts or to coexist with them.

Dublin Toy Boat

A small wooden replica of a Viking longboat was unearthed in Dublin.

Documents from St. Augustine, Florida shed light on life in the New World

The earliest documents relating to the city of St. Augustine, Florida (USA) are being digitized for preservation. The documents cover the time period from 1594 to 1763 CE.

Chinese coin found in Kenya suggests medieval trade route

Archaeologists have unearthed a 15th century Chinese coin on the Kenyan island of Manda. This find predates European exploration of Asia, indicating the Chinese may have traded directly with Africa.

Wool fleece helps date Christian church

A tiny scrap of wool fleece, found in a grave, has helped to date an early Christian church in Maryport, Cumbria, England. The wool, which dated to the 3rd or 4th century CE, showed that a structure, accompanied by Christian burials, was probably a Christian church from the late Roman period.

The truth about Hadrian's Wall

All may not have been sweetness and light between the Romans and the local inhabitants during the time of the building of Hadrian's Wall in northern England. A new study suggests that the absence of settlements and artifacts proves that the Romans ejected the locals from the area of the wall.

How Old Is That Clay Pot, Really?

Danish Stone Age pots may not be as old as originally determined if fish were cooked in them.

London rail excavations unearth plague graves

Digging for a new rail line in london, England has revelaed a mass grave with 13 skeletons in it. Dates based on pottery indicate that the graves date to the mid 1300s.

Lost in the bath

Researchers might often wonder what went on in Roman baths, and now archaeologist Alissa Whitmore believes she may have some answers. For some time, Whitmore has studied objects discovered in the drains of Roman bathhouses, and has presented her findings at the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America in Seattle.

Cardinal Wolsey next in line for body search?

The body seach continues. This time the target is Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, who died in 1530, and was Archbishop of York and Lord Chancellor to Henry VIII. Wolsey died and was buried at Leicester Abbey. Now city councillor Ross Willmott wants to search for Wolsey's remains.

Another Knightly Skeleton Found in Car Park

The grave of a medieval warrior has been unearthed under a Scottish car park.   The site was originally that of a 13th-century monastery.

Call for papers on Viking Age Culture

The Annual IMR Postgraduate Conference at the University of Nottingham in England is calling for papers to be presented at its conference to be held July 5, 2013. The deadline for submission is April 1, 2013

Higgins Armory to close

The Higgins Armory Museum, much beloved of SCAdians, will be closing at the end of the year. The museum houses one of the biggest collections of arms and armor in the United States.

Roman bricks and cat prints bring mystery to Fort Vancouver

A grad student visiting Fort Vancouver, Washington (USA) in 1982 noticed some bricks at the fort that didn't look like the others. Analysis later revealed that these bricks were made in Roman England.

Medieval village found in Scotland

A previously unknown medieval village has been unearthed near Selkirk, Scotland.  The site was found during costruction of a water main.