Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Ancient gold figurine found in Danish field

A gold figurine of a bound, nude woman has been found in a farm field in Bornholm, Denmark. This is the fifth gold figurine found near each other in the same field. The woman dates to the 6th century CE.

Richard III generates first research paper

It must have been a race to the finish line, but the first academic paper to be published on the discovery of the remains of Richard III is The king in the car park: new light on the death and burial of Richard III in the Grey Friars church, Leicester, in 1485 by Richard Buckley, Mathew Morris, Jo Appleby, Turi King, Deirdre O'Sullivan, and Lin Foxhall.

New world duel may be the answer to colonial murder mystery

Excavations in 1996 at Jamestown, VA (USA) revealed that one of its earliest settlers died of a gunshot wound. Researchers now believe they have solved his murder. They believe the man was named George Harrison and that he was killed in a duel.

Conference reflects new interest in King Arthur

In recent years, archaeologists have renewed their interest in finding the historic King Arthur. At the Footsteps of King Arthur Conference in Glastonbury, England, experts urged each other to keep looking, possibly as far north as Scotland.

Houses scheduled to grace Fulford battlefield

The "most likely candidate" for the site of the Battle of Fulford, according to English Heritage, is Germany Beck, an area scheduled to be developed into a community of 600 new homes, approved by the City of York Council.

Eternal love in Romania

Archaeologists are speculating on the meaning of the discovery of a pair of skeletons in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, dating to the Middle Ages, found buried together and holding hands. The pair was found during excavations at a former Dominican monastery.

William and Kate's housing plans delayed by proposed archaeological dig

The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge may have to delay their move into Anmer Hall, the Georgian mansion given to them by the Queen as their new country home, due to two archaeological digs scheduled to take place on the property.

Archaeologists seek lost Pictish kingdom

A team of archaeologists from Aberdeen are looking for a lost kingdom -- not in some exotic country, but in their own backyard. The experts are seeking Fortriu, "one of the most powerful Kingdoms of the 'painted people,'” now believed to have been located in the Moray Firth area.

Coin hoard found in Estonia

A hoard of silver coins dating to the 11th century was found in a wetland in Jõgeva, Estonia. The coins are believed to have been placed there as a deliberate sacrifice.

Photos of the Mary Rose

CNN goes inside the new Mary Rose museum in Portsmouth, England. The Mary Rose was a warship that sank in 1545 during a battle with the French.

Alken Bog site of human sacrifice?

Post-Roman Germania was a dangerous place, both for intenders invaders and those who found themselves on the bad side of the warlord. This was the conclusion of a team of Danish archaeologists investigating a bog in present day Denmark where the team discovered the remains of 40 men "hacked to bits and thrown into the shallows of Lake Mosso."

Archaeologists search for the body of James IV at Flodden

On 19 September 1513, Scottish King James IV was killed at the Battle of Flodden in Northumberland, England, along with 10,000 other Scots. Now archaeologists are scouring the battlefield, hoping to find the remains of the king. The project marks the 500th anniversary of the battle.

Stone from medieval church found in Welsh stream

An archeologist taking a walk in the woods discovered an inscribed stone that likely belonged to a nearby medieval church in Wales.  The decoration on the stone dates to the 9th or 10th century. The stone features an unusual cross only seen in two other stones.

Perthshire community pitches in to excavate Pictish longhouse

Residents of Perthshire, Scotland will have a unique opportunity in June 2013 to re-discover their own heritage when archaeologists will undertake the excavation of a Pictish longhouse. In addition to the chance to help in the dig, the project will include workshops, guided walks, presentations, and demonstrations.

London's "lost stream" yields treasures.

Beneath the streets of London runs a river of gold - not actual gold and not actually a river, but archaeological gold in the form of the "lost" Walbrook River. Dubbed "the Pompeii of the north," the thick layer of mud has been a treasure trove of Roman artifacts, from a gladiator’s amber amulet to entire buildings. (photos and video)

The mystery of the Lewes skeleton closer to a solution?

Experts are hoping to puzzle out the mystery of a skeleton found buried in a cemetery in the middle of the Lewes battlefield, the site of the historic 1264 Battle of Lewes, which "resulted in the king's defeat and the summoning of England's first representative parliament - as an 'early struggle for democracy.'" All other battle casualties were "slung into a pit.”

Detailed map created of underwater town in England

Archaeologists have created a detailed map of the medieval port city of Dunwich, dubbed "Britain's Atlantis" because it sank into the sea centuries ago.  Using both high-tech imaging and historic research, archaeologists have been able to map out the town boundaries, streets, and even identify individual buildings.

"Mysterious" skeleton found in Irish crannog

Archaeologists are pondering the cause of death of a 15th century teenager buried in an "irregular" manner on a crannog, a man made island settlement, in County Fermanagh, Ireland. The remains of the young woman seem to indicate a hasty burial, leading experts to consider foul play.

"Romans Revealed" project allows children to "dig" into diversity of Roman Britain

A new interactive website, aimed at children, has been launched by the Runnymede Trust and archaeologists from the University of Reading. The site focusses on the diversity of Roman Britain by allowing children to learn about Roman residents such as the ‘Ivory Bangle Lady,’ a "high status young woman of North African descent who remains were buried in Roman York."

Public encouraged to participate in Navenby dig

The recent discovery of what is believed to be a Roman dwelling, dating to the 3rd or 4th century, in Navenby, Lincolnshire, England, offers an opportunity to the public to participate in a real archaeological dig. Work on the site is being sponsored by the Heritage Lottery Fund and will continue until September.

"Exciting" find may point to Anglo-Saxon monastery

Work on the heating system of St Hilda’s Church, on Hartlepool’s Headland in England, has unearthed an Anglo Saxon grave, leading experts to believe that the church was constructed over site of St Hilda’s Anglo-Saxon monastery. Dr Steve Sherlock, of Tees Archaeology, said: “It’s an exciting thing."

Archaeologists hope to find Roman fort in Midlands flood zone

After serious flooding, the Environment Agency in England is studying plans to build flood defences along the River Derwent near Derby in the Midlands, but before that work begins, archaeologists are being given access to an area known to be the site of a Roman fort.

Could Winchester bones be Alfred the Great?

Archaeologists have exhumed the remains from an unmarked grave at St Bartholomew's Church in Winchester, England, hoping they have found the bones of the Saxon king Alfred the Great who died in 899.

Cologne excavations reveal rich Jewish history

For years, archaeologists have concentrated on Roman excavations in western Germany, largely ignoring its medieval past, especially when it came to Jewish history. Now the discovery of over 250,000 artifacts in Cologne, is revealing new insights into "one of Europe's oldest and biggest Jewish communities."

17 Jewish "souls are now at peace" in Norwich

In a recent burial service considered an "historic event," 17 sets of remains of Jewish descent were laid to rest in Norwich, England. The bones were discovered in 2004 in a well, and are believed to be victoms of 12th century religious persecution.

Plague burial discovered in London construction project

In the 14th century, Charterhouse Square in London was no-man's land, making it an excellent place to bury victims of the Black Plague. Now the site is the focus of archaeological investigations after being unearthed during construction of the city's Crossrail project. (video)

Face of "headless king" revealed

Four hundred years after his death, facial reconstructionists have revealed the face of France's 'Good King Henri IV' whose mummifed head is believed to have been discovered in an attic in 2008.

LIDAR may reveal camp of Hadrian's Wall builders

The study of a series of old LIDAR (light detection and ranging) aerial photos has led to the discovery of what may be a camp of the men who constructed Hadrian's Wall. The find could change the way historians view civilian life in Roman Britain.

King Edmund under the tennis court?

King Edmund of England, later St. Edmund after being shot by Viking raiders in the 9th century, might be buried under the tennis courts at Bury St Edmunds, once the Abbey graveyard. After Richard III, some historians would like to know.

Knight's grave may be part of family crypt

Seven skeletons have been unearthed under a car park in Edinburgh, Scotland, where a knight's grave has previously been found. The skeletons include women and children, leading archaeologists to conclude that it may be a family burial crypt.