Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Dante's True Face

Dante Allegheri, the Italian poet whose work, The Divine Comedy, is almost required reading for SCAdians, has been depicted in the past with a classical profile, his nose straight. A team of forensic archeologists is challenging that picture with a reconstructed face of the poet, featuring a flattened nose.

Odysseus's Home Identified?

British researchers believe that boreholes and seismic imaging prove they have pinpointed the homeland of Homer's hero Odysseus.

Mysterious rings puzzle archaeologists at the tomb of Chinese empress

Chinese archaeologists are confounded by a group 10 huge rings at the site of the tomb of the country's only empress, Wu Zetian. The rings, ranging from 30 to 40 meters in diameter, were discovered when aerial photos were taken.

Ljubljanica River gives up gifts

In an excerpt from the December 2006 issue of National Geographic Magazine, Carol Kaufmann looks at the reasons why Romans, Celts and others dumped their precious treasures into the Ljubljanica River in Slovenia.

Early Christian graves discovered in the Ukraine

Early Christian burials dating to the 11th and 13th centuries have been found in Chernihiv in the Ukraine. Experts believe that the 30 tombs prove that the city was important in early Russian history.

Palatine Hill excavation in Rome yields artifacts from deposed Emperor

The Emperor Maxentius was defeated by Constantine I in a battle in the year 321 C.E., but his followers apparently concealed his scepter, ceremonial weapons, and other regalia from Constantine's forces by burying the items. Archaeologists excavating Palatine Hill in Rome have located the cache, which is notable for the condition of the objects.

Evidence of Norsemen in the Roman Legions

"It is a well known fact that people from so called barbaric tribes like the German tribes up north, were recruited into the Roman legions." Now, new finds in Norway demonstrate that the northern lands had closer ties to the Roman Empire than previously believed.

Curse Tablet Expands Knowledge of Roman Britain

Archaelogists from the University of Leicester have found a fragment of lead that greatly adds to their knowledge of the city's Roman past. The "curse tablet" bears a list of 18 names; until now, only a few names of Roman residents of the city were known.

Scientists at last understand ancient calculating device

After many years of study, scientists at last can fathom the works of a calculating device from ancient Greece, which some researchers consider more valuable than the Mona Lisa due to its unique historical value.

Roman Coins Offered to Placate the Gods?

Archaeologists working near the city of Cuijk in the Netherlands have discovered a cache of 3rd century Roman coins and other treasures, apparently as an offering at the spot where a bolt of lightning had struck.

Jutland Stones May Bear New Runic Inscriptions

Seven stones have been discovered in the vicinity of Denmark's 10th century Jellinge stones. One or two of the new stones may also have runic inscriptions.

Turkish Archaeologist Not Anti-Islam, Court Finds

Muazzez Ilmiye Cig's research into ancient Sumer led her to the conclusion that headscarves were worn in that culture's sexual rites. But when she made this claim in her book, the 92-year-old archaeologist found herself in court accused of insulting Muslim women.

Early Horse Domestication Evidence in Kazahkstan

Evidence from soil suggests that people were relying on domesticated horses for survival more than 5,000 years ago.

Viking Era Coins found on Isle of Gotland

On the Swedish Isle of Gotland, Edvin and Arvid Sandborg were helping a neighbor with his garden when they began to dig up old coins, one of them a 1,100 year-old arabic coin.

Viking ship found in Larvik

Archaeologists found the remains of a ship from the Viking Age recently, in a burial mound on a farm outside the coastal city of Larvik.

Shopping Center May Hide Rare 15th Century Jewish Cemetery

Archaeologists working on the site of a shopping center in Pizen, Bohemia are seeking a rare, Jewish cemetery dating to the 15th century. Researchers know that Jewish graves tend to be well-preserved and expect them to yield valuable information on the life of the community.

Oslo Garbage Dump Yields Medieval Treasures

A garbage dump dating from the 13th or 14th century has been discovered in Oslo, Norway. The massive collection of discarded items includes over 1,000 shoes.

City of Moscow May be Older than Previously Believed

Ongoing archaeological investigations in Moscow may show that the city is older than the 859 years taught by Russian historians.

Researchers seek sunken Spanish colony ship

In 1526, Luis Vasquez de Ayllon attempted to establish a Spanish colony on the coast of what is now the state of Georgia. He ran his vessel aground off the South Carolina coast, and it all began to go horribly wrong. Now researchers are looking for the wrecked flagship of the colony expedition.

War 2, Archaeology 0

Recent bombing and a resulting oil spill in Lebanon have damaged two World Heritage sites, says an inspection team from UNESCO. Roman remains at Tyre and a medieval tower at Byblos are in urgent need of repair.

Royal University of Scir Hafoc (RUSH)

description:
Burg Al Mudirah (St. Louis Community College) Under the protection and the guidance of the Barony of Three Rivers is delighted to host the Fall Session of Royal University of Scir Hafoc (RUSH) Saturday - September, 30, 2006.

Due to the incredible generosity of the Barony of Three Rivers there is NO SITE FEE

Activities will include classes and demonstrations of medieval fighting, costuming, weaving, dying, woodworking, the bardic arts, and other diverse arts and sciences. Location:
College of Burg Al Mudirah (St. Louis, Missouri)

Report of Pyramid Find in Ukraine

An archaeological team working in eastern Ukraine claims to have found pyramids.

CSI Needed for Roman Crime?

An archaeological team working near Sedgeford,England may need the help of criminal investigators to solve a 1500-year-old mystery: was the skeleton found pushed into the oven of a Roman farm murdered?

Roman Village Found Near Bonn, Germany

Archaeologists working near Bonn, Germany have found the remains of a Roman village complete with baths.