Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Museum offers virtual tour of Roman road

A new exhibit at the Museum of the Diocletian Baths in Rome lets visitors take a virtual walk down the Via Flaminia, a major travel artery which was "built in the third century B.C.E. to connect Rome to Ariminum, today's Rimini, on the Adriatic sea."

Edinburgh is archaeologist's treasure trove

Joanna Vallely of the Edinburgh Evening News takes a look at archaeological projects in the city, including excavations at the Grassmarket, Newbridge and the Scottish Parliament.

Viking halls may help rewrite Norwegian history

Norwegian historians are rethinking the distribution of power in Viking Norway after the recent discovery of two massive Viking halls in Borre. The halls date to around 700-800 C.E. (photos)

"Mysterious black substance" found in West Stow pits

Archaeologists working at an Anglo Saxon village in West Stow, near Bury St Edmunds, England have discovered the remains of three 6th century pits. The pits contained a "mysterious black substance."

"Most significant piece of wooden furniture" found in Rome

A wooden and ivory throne, dating to the times of Julius Caesar, has been discovered in Herculaneum and is considered to be "the most significant piece of wooden furniture ever discovered there."

Archaeologists uncover Prague's oldest ramparts

Archaeologists have uncovered parts of Prague's oldest ramparts, dating back to the 9th and 10th centuries. The remnants of the wall, which was part of one of Prague's main entrance gates, were discovered in the cellar of the Academy of Performing Arts building.

Six medieval bishops identified in Scotland

Radiocarbon dating was used recently to help identify the remains of six bishops found buried in at Whithorn Priory in Galloway, Scotland. The skulls dated from between 1200-1360 CE. (photos)

50 years of ADS research online

The Archaeology Data Service (ADS) has announced the publication of 50 years of their Medieval Archeology publication on their website.

DNA and linguistic studies show Liverpool's Viking heritage

Researchers believe that the area around Liverpool, England was a Viking settlement. Their findings are based on original surnames and DNA evidence.

What happened to the Greenland colonists?

For decades, researchers have debated the cause for the disappearance of the Norse colonists in Greenland. Where they massacred? Assimilated? Or did they starve? Now scientists think they have the answer.

Archaeologists explore 450 year old shipwreck off Florida

Archaeologists are studying the buried remains of a ship from a Spanish colonization fleet led by Don Tristan de Luna.

Archaeologists search for abbott's grave at Hulton Abbey

A team of archaeologists from Keele University are using the latest geophysical equipment to search the grounds of Hulton Abbey in England hoping to find the graves of the monks who lived there as far back as the 13th century.

Anglo Saxon jewelry a "real find"

Archaeologists are delighted with the discovery of "the only known Anglo-Saxon royal burial site in the North of England" near Loftus on Teesside, where they found some incredible jewelry dating to the mid 7th century.

Archaeologists seek early Spanish evidence in Georgia

Archaeologists working on a dig in southern Telfair County, Georgia, believed they were looking for a 17th century Spanish mission. Instead they found something even more interesting: evidence of Spanish explorer Hernando de Soto's 1540 travels through the state.

Roman burial ground discovered in the Blacklands

The remains of four adults dating to the 1st century have been discovered in Staverton near Trowbridge, England. The area is known to locals as the Blacklands and is said to be haunted. (photo of Roman coin)

Romulus and Remus cave found?

Italian archaeologists believe they have found the cave where, according to legend, a she-wolf nursed Romulus and Remus, the twin founders of Rome.

Infant mortality research abstract online

The News for Medievalists blog reports that a research paper dealing with the topic of infant mortality has been published in the American Journal of Physical Anthropology

Saxon remains found in Twyford

Workers on the site of a school in Twyford, England worried when they discovered human remains until it was determined that the skeletons belonged to 1,300-year-old Saxons.

Roman tombstone found in Scotland

A red sandstone Roman Tombstone, the first Scottish example ever found, has been unearthed near Inveresk, Scotland proving "that Inveresk was a pivotal Roman site in northern Britain."

Blacksmith's house yields Roman treasure

Archaeologists working on a site near Coriscada in northeastern Portugal have discovered a hoard of over 4,000 coins dating to the 4th century inside the wall of the home of a Roman blacksmith.

Roman Copenhagen

Danish archaeologists have discovered a rare 4th century Roman cemetery near Copenhagen, Denmark. "It is something special and rare in Denmark to have so many (ancient Roman) graves in one place," said archaeologist Rune Iversen.

Archaeologists find Viking Norwich

Archaeologists working in Norwich, England have discovered city walls dating back to Viking times. “Our finding gives us the old geography of the city and lets us look at the history of the defensive mechanisms used in Norwich at the time," said Andy Hutcheson, archaeology manager for NAU Archaeology.

75 medieval graves found in Novgorod

Russian archaeologists have discovered 75 graves dating from the 15th to 18th centuries C.E. in Veliki Novgorod. The experts hope that more tombs will be found.

Middle Ages: golden era of "girl power"

A new study by Sue Niebrzydowski of Bangor University's Institute of Early and Modern Studies says that women of 600 years ago had unprecedented power and independence.

Viking ship resurfaces under UK pub.

A team from Nottingham University's archaeology department believes it has rediscovered the remains of an intact Viking boat under a Merseyside pub.

BBC drama "makes archaeology sexy", says editor

Bone Kickers, a new drama on BBC One scheduled for Spring 2008, will follow the work of a team of archaeologists in Bath, England.

1,500 plague victims found in mass grave on Venice "Quarantine" Island

National Geographic reports that a mass grave containing the remains of over 1,500 victims of the plague has been discovered on Venice's Lazzaretto Vecchi, an island used to quarantine the sick.

Scientists still studying mystery of medieval skulls

Archaeologists from English Heritage have yet to formulate a theory about the change in shape of medieval skulls between the 11th and 13th centuries. The shape changed from a long, narrow head to a rounder shape.

12 medieval graves found at Aldbourne

Archaeologists working on a dig at Crowcastle in Aldbourne, England have discovered 12 graves dating back to the 8th century. The remains were unearthed during excavation for a housing development.

Footprint in time

The footprint of a hobnailed sandal has caused quite a stir since it was discovered during work at the Roman city of Sussita, east of Lake Kinneret in Israel.