Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

British students find Saxon grave

A class of teenagers on a class dig have discovered the remains of a woman believed to have been Saxon in Chediston, England. The woman was buried in classic Christian style in a churchyard.

DeSoto's Florida camp found

Archaeologists are studying what they believe are the remnants of conquistador Hernando de Soto's camp in Tallahasse, Florida abandoned in 1540. The site is near the modern state capitol.

British historians hope to crack down on "nighthawking"

English Heritage and the British Museum are pushing for legislation to curtail the illegal use of metal detectors to discover and remove artifacts from private sites.

2,000-year-old Iron Age roundhouses may be washed away by storms

A team of archaeologists from St. Andrews University are battling against time to study Iron Age roundhouses on the Scottish island of North Uist. The structures were first exposed in 2005, and are now in danger of washing away in a storm.

Secrets of Scone to be revealed?

Archaeologists working on the grounds Scone Palace in Scotland hope to learn more about the site where the famous Scottish Stone of Destiny was mined, and more about the country's early history.

Secrets of Assassins' fort unearthed in Syria

Nestled at the foot of Syria's coastal mountains, an ancient citadel has been put on the tourist map by restoration and excavation that revealed mysteries of the medieval Assassins sect that was once based there.

An Inca in Sarpsborg

Archaeologists in Oestfold, Norway are trying to understand how an Inca Indian came to be buried in the Norwegian city in the 11th century.

Voyage of the Sea Stallion

On July 1, 2007, a crew of 65 men and women set sail from Denmark to Dublin on a reconstructed Viking warship called the Sea Stallion. The project's goal was to recreate the journey of the Viking raiding parties.

6th century European discovered in Chinese tomb

Chinese archaeologists have discovered the 1,400-year-old remains of a European man in a tomb in central China. The burial proves that cultural mixing was farther east than experts previously believed.

Using Science to Authenticate Lost Gospel of Judas

The National Geographic Society, the Maecenas Foundation for Ancient Art and the Waitt Institute for Historical Discovery have been working together "to authenticate, conserve, and translate a 66-page...codex."

Skeleton found in Trafalgar Square

Skeletal remains discovered recently in London's Trafalgar Square have not triggered the British equivalent of CSI. The remains are of a wealthy Roman man who was buried in the 5th century beneath what is now the busy city center.

Pre-Iron Age findings in Edinburgh Castle

A team of archaeologists working at Edinburgh Castle believe they have discovered traces of the sites original castle.

Tomb of King Herod found

For several decades, Israeli archaeologist Ehud Netzer has been looking for the tomb of King Herod. Now he believes he has found it at Herodium, a flattened hilltop in the Judean Desert.

Osteological measurement database online

The Museum of London's Centre for Human Bioarchaeology hosts a database of osteological measurements from human remains during the medieval and post-medieval periods.

Celtic temple discovered near Tara

In an interview with Conor Newman, an archaeology professor at the National University of Ireland, Galway, Melissa Block of NPR's All Things Considered learns about the recent discovery of a celtic temple near Ireland's Tara.

4th century Roman remains discovered in Croatia

Roman remains and artifacts were discovered recently in Vinkovci during excavations to construct a new sports hall including a fibula, a Roman ornamental clip, dating to the 4th century C.E.

Archaeologist to speak on La Grava manorial and monastic excavation

On May 9, 2007, Evelyn Baker, former manager of the Bedfordshire County Archaeological Survey, presents "La Grava: Bedfordshire's Best Kept Secret," about the 13-year project described as "the most important and extensive manorial and monastic excavation of the 20th century."

Finding your Viking roots

A new exhibit at the Jorvik Viking Centre in York, England allows visitors to study new scientific techniques used to determine what Viking life was like. The exhibit also includes a "3-dimensional walk-through Viking riverside scene, graphics and interactive activities."

Dig set for Edinburgh's Cowgate

Archaeologists are preparing to begin a major dig at the site of the 2002 Old Town fire in Edinburgh's Cowgate district. They hope to find the remains of buildings dating as far back as the 12th century.

Lincoln aqueduct was functional Roman water source

Archaeologists working on the Lincoln aqueduct in England now believe that underground water source was actually used by the Romans. For centuries it was believed that the aqueduct was built but never used by the Romans.

Roman fort destroyed by modern construction team

The Daily Express reports that the Roman fort at Caister, near Yarmouth, England, along with hundreds of artifacts, was destroyed when permission was given for builders to excavate on an archaeological site.

Medieval windmill found in Burwell

An unused plot of ground near Burwell, England, which was being tested for possible development, has revealed the remains of a medieval windmill dating as far back as the 13th century.

Rib bone NOT Joan of Arc's

John Leicester of the Globe and Mail reports on the ongoing controversy over the remains of Joan of Arc. The verdict: It is a rib bone, but it did not belong to Joan of Arc.

St. Clare Friary remains to be analyzed

Researchers will soon begin analysis of remains from 30 medieval graves discovered in February, 2007 in Preston, England's city center, believed to have once been the site of a friary dedicated to St. Clare.

Viking remains prove Black Sea ancestory

DNA evidence from the remains of a Viking woman seems to point to the fact that her ancestors originated in the area of the Black Sea. The woman was buried in a grave in Norway's Oseberg Viking ship, one of the country's most famous burial sites, but her roots were in the Black Sea region, according to Professor Per Holck of the University of Oslo.

"Lost" Islamic kingdom discovered

A team of French archaeologists have discovered three towns in the Rift Valley of Ethiopia which they believe are part of the "lost" Islamic kingdom of Shoa. The Muslim stronghold was an important stop on the trade route from the 10th to the 16th centuries.

Easter Island archaeologists conclude statues are petrified peeps

Archaeologists working at Easter Island have determined that the large statues are not volcanic rock, as once believed, but are, in fact, petrified peeps. Says project head Rock Newton, "Yes, we have verified that the statues are actually petrified Easter candy."

TaraWatch strives to save sacred site

An online campaign to save the historic Hill of Tara in Ireland has been created. TaraWatch is hoping to collect enough money to pay for a professional archaeological assessment of the M3 motorway at the site.

Viking Age journal online

Ceinan of House Kraken reports that the November 2000 edition of the archaeological journal Acta Archaeologica is available online. The issue is dedicated to articles on the Viking Age.

Roman village discovered in Wiltshire

Silbury Hill in Wiltshire, England may contain more than a Neolithic mound. It may also be the site of a first century Roman village. "English Heritage geophysicist Dr Neil Linford said: 'We are really excited by this discovery because we had no idea that a Roman village of such a size lay this close to Silbury Hill.'"