Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Medieval windmill found in Burwell

An unused plot of ground near Burwell, England, which was being tested for possible development, has revealed the remains of a medieval windmill dating as far back as the 13th century.

Rib bone NOT Joan of Arc's

John Leicester of the Globe and Mail reports on the ongoing controversy over the remains of Joan of Arc. The verdict: It is a rib bone, but it did not belong to Joan of Arc.

St. Clare Friary remains to be analyzed

Researchers will soon begin analysis of remains from 30 medieval graves discovered in February, 2007 in Preston, England's city center, believed to have once been the site of a friary dedicated to St. Clare.

Viking remains prove Black Sea ancestory

DNA evidence from the remains of a Viking woman seems to point to the fact that her ancestors originated in the area of the Black Sea. The woman was buried in a grave in Norway's Oseberg Viking ship, one of the country's most famous burial sites, but her roots were in the Black Sea region, according to Professor Per Holck of the University of Oslo.

"Lost" Islamic kingdom discovered

A team of French archaeologists have discovered three towns in the Rift Valley of Ethiopia which they believe are part of the "lost" Islamic kingdom of Shoa. The Muslim stronghold was an important stop on the trade route from the 10th to the 16th centuries.

Easter Island archaeologists conclude statues are petrified peeps

Archaeologists working at Easter Island have determined that the large statues are not volcanic rock, as once believed, but are, in fact, petrified peeps. Says project head Rock Newton, "Yes, we have verified that the statues are actually petrified Easter candy."

TaraWatch strives to save sacred site

An online campaign to save the historic Hill of Tara in Ireland has been created. TaraWatch is hoping to collect enough money to pay for a professional archaeological assessment of the M3 motorway at the site.

Viking Age journal online

Ceinan of House Kraken reports that the November 2000 edition of the archaeological journal Acta Archaeologica is available online. The issue is dedicated to articles on the Viking Age.

Roman village discovered in Wiltshire

Silbury Hill in Wiltshire, England may contain more than a Neolithic mound. It may also be the site of a first century Roman village. "English Heritage geophysicist Dr Neil Linford said: 'We are really excited by this discovery because we had no idea that a Roman village of such a size lay this close to Silbury Hill.'"

1500-year-old Saxon burial promises more discoveries to come

Archaeologists working at a recreational site near Oakington, England have discovered a 1500-year-old Saxon burial. They believe there is also evidence of a settlement.

Medieval graveyard found in Icelandic basement

At least ten graves believed to date back to the Middle Ages were found in a basement of a house in Rangá in Hróarstunga, east Iceland.

Bones of Saint Philipp for sale in Russia

The skull and bone purported to be holy relics of Saint Philipp are for sale by a private owner on a Russian website. The Russian Orthodox Church has called the sale "blasphemous."

Coventry pub renovation reveals dark past

Renovations on the Four Provinces Pub in Coventry, England have unearthed human remains dating to the 12th century. The bones show evidence of leprosy.

Medieval priory found beneath Somerset barn

Researchers working on artifacts found beneath a 16th century barn near Dunster, England believe they belong to the Benedictine Priory of Dunster which dates to 1127 CE. Archaeologists have so far discovered two walls, paving and glazed tile fragments.

Roman burial ground a surprise for Lincolnshire archaeologists

Water company workers in Lincolnshire, England were surprised recently to uncover a very large Roman cemetery dating to the 1st century CE. So far the graves have yielded artifacts as well as 30 skeletons.

Stonehenge village archaeologist interviewed

Australia's ABC Radio National recently broadcast an interview with Mike Parker Pearson, one of the archaeologists who discovered the ancient settlement near Stonehenge. Stephanie Kennedy conducts the interview. (Transcript and podcast available)

The truth about Cleopatra's good looks.

A silver denarius minted in 32 B.C. shows that the fabled image of Cleopatra is not what she really looked like.

York grave holds Roman murder victim

Archaeologists working on a large Roman cemetery in York, England have discovered, among the remains of wealthy and poor alike, the bones of a murder victim. "She was stabbed seven times in the throat from the front," said Osteo-archaeologist Malin Holst.

Bones in chains

A shackled skeleton thought to date from between the 13th and 16th centuries C.E. has been discovered in Ávila, Spain.

Viking Discovery Programme offering courses

Viking archaeologist Dan Carlsson reports that the Viking Discovery Programme is now accepting applications for field courses to take place during the summer of 2007. The courses will include excavations at the Viking Port of trade at Frojel.

Volunteers needed for Pompei summer project

Archaeologists working for the Pompeii Food and Drink Project are looking for volunteers to work on the site in June and July 2007. The work will consist of documenting storage buildings and organizing the massive amount of information collected.

Village related to Stonehenge found

A major prehistoric village has been unearthed near Stonehenge in southern England. Stonehenge didn't stand alone, excavations show, recent excavations of Salisbury Plain in southern England have revealed at least two other large stone formations close by the world-famous prehistoric monument.

"Henries Towne" settlement found near Virginia Beach

Archaeologists working at a site on the Lynnhaven River in Virginia have discovered what they believe to be the remains of Henries Towne, a settlement contemporary with Jamestown.

8th century ship found in Mediterranean Sea

An 8th century shipwreck, discovered off the coast of Dor, Israel in the Mediterranean Sea, is believed to be the only existing ship of its kind. Discovered over a decade ago, the wreck has been the subject of intensive study and carbon dating.

400-year-old seeds help tell Jamestown story

The recent discovery of some 400-year-old seeds in a well at the Colonial Jamestown archaeological site has given researchers much to ponder about the life and survival skills of the early Jamestown settlers.

New Medieval Views of Stonehenge

This new view of Stonehenge is a tiny Medieval drawing in the "scala mundi" or "world ladder" on a chart which chronicles Creation. While not the oldest image of Stonehenge, it one of only a few known to exist.

Pazyryk warrior gives keys to Russian past

The well-preserved, frozen remains of a 2,000-year-old Russian warrior, found recently in the Altai mountains region of Russia, have archaeologists excited.

13th century treasures found in Berwick dig

Archaeologists working at a dig in the Walkergate area of Berwick, England have uncovered a number of artifacts dating to the "heyday of Berwick," including a silver coin from the reign of Henry III.

New Viking Find in Western Norway

A newly discovered 9th Century grave in Western Norway is yielding many treasures. The grave of a female has so far produced jewelry, many pearls, glass beads, scissors, a knife and other household utensils. The quality and size of the finds indicate a high status grave.

Volunteers needed for Mongolian archaeology project

Mongolian enthusiasts may find an outlet for their interests during the summer of 2007 when the Silkroad Foundation, in conjunction with the National Museum of Mongolian History and the University of Pennsylvania, will sponsor excavations in the Altai Mountains of Khovd aimag, Mongolia.