Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Stonehenge dating controversy continues

New research on Stonehenge finds that it is actually older than previously believed. A recent excavation headed by Mike Parker-Pearson, professor of archaeology at Sheffield University, finds the monument to date to 3000 BCE and to have connections to cremation of the dead.

Russian horse tomb stumps archaeologists

The discovery of a 14th century tomb at Staraya Russa holding the remains of 14 horses puzzles archaeologists. The experts feel the site was not used for slaughter or rituals, but have no other explanation for the mass grave.

Vikings needed women!

New research may show that the Viking raids of the 8th through 11th centuries may have been triggered by a shortage of marriageable women, possibly brought on by the Norsemen themselves.

Roman bones found near Fosse Way

Several ancient graves were found recently near Leicestershire, England containing the remains of several humans believed to have been Roman. The graves were found near the Roman Fosse Way.

Lakenheath dig reveals 450 Saxon graves

Over 400 graves dating to the Saxon period have been discovered at the site of a road project near the RAF facility Lakenheath in Suffolk, England.

Russian archaeologists find Khazar capital

Archaeologists from Astrakhan State University believe they have discovered the long-lost capital of the Khazar kingdom in southern Russia. The Khazars were a semi-nomadic people who converted to Judaism between the 8th and 10th centuries.

Lifestyles of the rich and Roman

A new exhibit on life in a Roman villa is now open at the Complesso di San Nicolo in Ravenna, Italy. Titled Otium: The Art of Living in the Roman House of the Imperial Age, the exhibit includes frescos, mosaics and over 100 household items.

14th century cemetery found in Berlin

Workers at a building site in central Berlin have stumbled across a huge medieval cemetery containing 2,000 bodies dating to the 14th century. Many of the remains are those of children.

Female remains found in Newcastle Roman sarcophagus

Archaeologists working on a burial site near Newcastle, England, have opened a pair of sarcophagi, one containing the remains of a child, and the other the remains of a woman. The site is believed to have been a former chapel near Hadrian's wall dating to the 4th century C.E. (video)

Vikings not driven from Canada by the Thule

New research shows that Viking settlers in Newfoundland were not driven from the country by the native Thule, a native ancestor of the Inuits. Scientific re-dating has placed the native tribes in the area 150 years after the Viking settlements.

Carmelite friars graves found in Perth

A team of archaeologists have discovered the over 50 skeletons dating to the 13th century, of Carmelite friars and other later burials. The remains were found at the future site of retail units in Perth Scotland. The experts have also uncovered the site of the friary church.

12th century Byzantine still found in Bulgaria

Bulgarian archaeologist Prof Nikolay Ovcharov has discovered a 12th century still believed to have been used in the study of alchemy in the remains of a Byzantine mansion near the village of Tatul, Bulgaria.

"Caesar" donated to charity shop

The 2,000-year-old skeleton of a Roman greyhound has been donated to a Lincolnshire, England charity shop. The bones were first discovered at the Lawn in Lincoln in 1986, and are believed to date to the Roman era.

Rare Roman lance found at Caerleon

Archaeologists working on a Roman site near Caerleon, Wales have discovered an extremely rare legionary's ceremonial lance. "I don't know of any of that type in Britain," said Dr Peter Guest. (video)

Pompeii declared in a "state of emergency"

For the next year, the ancient city of Pompeii will exist in a "state of emergency" while Italian experts strive to save the historic ruins which suffer from "lack of investment, mismanagement, litter and looting."

Northumberland Iron Age dig one of largest ever in NE England

Archaeologists working at the Delhi surface mine in Northumberland, England have unearthed the remains of at least 50 Iron Age houses, making the project one of the largest in northeast England's archaeological history.

From the halls of Montezuma

Mexican archaeologists believe they have, at long last, found the fabled palace of Aztec emperor Montezuma, destroyed by the conquistador Hernando Cortés in 1521.

7th century Lomard buried with horse

Italian archaeologists have discovered the burial site of a Lombard warrior interred with his horse. The skeletons were found n a park at Testona, near Turin, Italy.

Alabaster bust of Cleopatra Discovered in Egyptian Temple

It's a bit early for SCA, but still interesting: A bust of Cleopatra made from alabaster and a mask that may have belonged to Marc Antony are among the many items discovered in the Taposiris Magna temple, north of Alexandria, Egypt.

Scandinavians "genetically diverse" for over 2000 years say researchers

A study of Danish burial grounds dating to the Iron Age by a team of forensic scientists from the University of Copenhagen finds that humans were much more genetically diverse than previously believed.

11st century Jain statue found in Pushkar, India

Archaeologists working on a site near Ajmer, India have discovered a black stone statue of Jain Tirthankar Kuntunath in a meditating posture dating to the 11th century. The statue is one of 36 discovered in old Pushkar in the past year.

Archaeologists search for lost Welsh towns

Two Welsh towns near Carmarthenshire are missing. Records show that they existed in the 14th and 15th centuries, but they have long since disappeared. Now researchers hope to find them within the grounds of Dinefwr Park and Castle near Llandeilo.

"Lost" medieval church of Dunwich found with modern technology

Marine archaeologists believe they have discovered a medieval church which tumbled off an eroded cliff into the ocean in Suffolk County, England. The remains were discovered using sonar and underwater cameras.

Copper Age "Stonehenge of Sevilla" could become supermarket

Castilleja, Spain's mayor Carmelo Cebo does not believe in the value of the 4,500-year-old Copper Age burial site near Sevilla, calling it "just a pile of stones," not worth saving. The site may be destined to be bulldozed to make way for developers.

The mystery of the missing skeletons

Dozens of skeletons, thought to be Muslim and dating from the 8th or 9th centuries C.E, have been removed from the site of excavations near the Temple Mount according to the Israel Antiquities Authority who have deemed the incident "a serious mishap."

Scientists Think Humans Arrived in New Zealand in 1280 C.E.

Scientists studying rat remains and seeds eaten by the rats believe humans did not colonize New Zealand until 1280 C.E. because they could not have swum the distances from the nearest islands.

Search continues for "Lost Colony"

Researchers from the First Colony Foundation are gearing up to begin an extensive search for America's "Lost Colony." The project will be covered by the Time Team America program.

Study finds Stonehenge may have been royal burial ground

Researchers from the University of Sheffield, England, say that radiocarbon dating of remains from Stonehenge suggest that the site was a burial ground for Britain's first royal dynasty, as early as 500 years before the stones were erected.

The Birka Project information online

One of the most impressive archaeological sites for the Viking Age is Birka at Björkö in Lake Mälaren, Sweden. A website describing the site and its artifacts is available online.

Did smallpox kill Gloucester Romans?

Experts working on the recently-discovered mass Roman grave in Gloucester, England will be using DNA tests to determine what killed over 90 individuals. A first look at the remains points to a 2nd century smallpox outbreak that swept across Britain.