Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Vikings acquitted in ritual killing

New evidence pertaining to the death of a Viking woman found in a ship burial disputes the earlier belief that the woman was ritually murdered. "We have no reason to think violence was the cause of death," Per Holck, professor of anatomy at Oslo University, told Reuters after studying the two women who died in 834 aged about 80 and 50.

Sherwood's "Thynghowe" may be Anglo-Saxon mound

Husband and wife Lynda Mallet and Stuart Reddish discovered a mysterious mound three years ago in Sherwood Forest, Nottingham, England with the help of 19th century maps. Now they believe the site may have been an Anglo-Saxon gathering place.

French Templar tomb found

The remains of a Templar knight have been discovered in a tomb near Rennes-le-Chateau, France along with a cache of gold and coins. The mummified body wore the still-recognizable shroud of the order. (video)

New dig may explain Stonehenge

Just a few weeks after beginning, the excavators now working at Stonehenge have had what they describe as a "breakthrough." Clues towards the original placement of the bluestones, the site's oldest elements, may reveal why Stonehenge was built.

Combs and shears honored Anglo Saxon dead

Archaeologists have long believed that Anglo Saxon burial customs required elaborate displays, but new evidence points to the use of more common devotions such as combs, razors and other household items.

3rd century amulet places Jews in Austria

A gold amulet dating to the 3rd century CE inscribed with a Jewish prayer has been discovered in the grave of a Roman child in Halbturn, Austria proving that people of the Jewish faith inhabited the country at the time.

The Vikings return to Nottingham

The Vikings will return to Nottingham, England April 26, 2008 for From Bones to Berserkers -- Vikings Under the Spotlight, the Midlands Viking Symposium 2008 at The University of Nottingham. The program will include presentations by some of the worlds greatest authorities on Norse and Viking culture.

Roman subway excavations produce wonderful archaeological finds

Archaeologists working at the site of a subway line near the Piazza Venezia in Rome have made some incredible finds including a 6th century copper factory and artifacts from a Renaissance palace kitchen.

"The Quest" follows journey of the Templars

The Quest, a Classic Media Group production, follows the journey of the Knights Templar through Europe by studying the work of archaeologists, anthropologists and historians.

Anglo-Saxon cemetery yields treasure

The discovery of a series of 5th century Anglo Saxon graves in Kent, England has created the need for an inquest before the Kent County Council due to the wealth of artifacts found with the graves.

Rare Anglo-Saxon grave markers found in cathedral walls

Archaeologists are excited about the discovery of rare Anglo-Saxon grace markers in the walls of Peterborough Cathedral. The markers, which are believed to date from the 11th century, were discovered during restoration work to the cathedral.

Reburial for Anglo Saxon remains

A funeral service, spoken in Anglo-Saxon, will be held in North Lincolnshire, England, to re-inter over three thousand skeletons that were discovered there almost three decades ago. The bones were disinterred as part of a study on the history of diseases.

Medieval belt buckle discovered in Scotland

A sewer line breakage in Perth, Scotland, has led to discovery of a copper alloy belt buckle that probably dates back to the 12th century.

Medieval skull and remains found in river

A worker dredging in the River Lark in Suffolk, England, recently found a skull and other human remains from the Middle Ages. The find also included bones from a juvenile and a metal buckle that has been dated to the 14th century.

Have We Got a Tannery?

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Members of the Archaeological Leather Group are frequently contacted by archaeologists who think they have uncovered a tannery site. Very often, the only evidence is a hole in the ground containing some pieces of leather. In order to increase knowledge and understanding of leather manufacturing techniques, the ALG is organising conference entitled Archaeological Leather Group Weekend Conference HAVE WE GOT A TANNERY? Location:
Archaeological Leather Group (Walsall, England)

Pictish stone carvings cleaned up

High-tech laser technology has been used to record and conserve one of the finest collections of Pictish carved stones in Scotland.

Discovered Roman settlement will not stop modern cemetery plans

The recent discovery of a Roman settlement near Lincoln, England, will not hold up plans for the creation of a modern cemetery. Archaeologists believe that the settlement dates from between the 2nd and 4th centuries.

Druid Grave Unearthed in U.K.?

Archaeologists excavating a series of 1st century graves in Colchester, England think one of them may belong to a Druid.

Viking sites proposed for UNESCO Heritage Sites

Several Viking Age sites around the Baltic Sea have been proposed as UNESCO Heritage Sites. The locations include Haithabu, a village in Germany, and the Dannevirke, a series of earthen walls.

Medieval documents help locate Roman fort

Archaeologists working on the excavation of a Roman fort near Calstock in Cornwall credit references to silver smelting in medieval documents for helping to locate the site.

Dives to Suffolk's sunken city may reveal medieval village

England's lost city of Dunwich has become a region of interest for underwater archaeologists who want to explore the medieval city. Britain's "Atlantis" was lost due to coastal erosion and rediscovered in the 1970's.

Museum offers virtual tour of Roman road

A new exhibit at the Museum of the Diocletian Baths in Rome lets visitors take a virtual walk down the Via Flaminia, a major travel artery which was "built in the third century B.C.E. to connect Rome to Ariminum, today's Rimini, on the Adriatic sea."

Edinburgh is archaeologist's treasure trove

Joanna Vallely of the Edinburgh Evening News takes a look at archaeological projects in the city, including excavations at the Grassmarket, Newbridge and the Scottish Parliament.

Viking halls may help rewrite Norwegian history

Norwegian historians are rethinking the distribution of power in Viking Norway after the recent discovery of two massive Viking halls in Borre. The halls date to around 700-800 C.E. (photos)

"Mysterious black substance" found in West Stow pits

Archaeologists working at an Anglo Saxon village in West Stow, near Bury St Edmunds, England have discovered the remains of three 6th century pits. The pits contained a "mysterious black substance."

"Most significant piece of wooden furniture" found in Rome

A wooden and ivory throne, dating to the times of Julius Caesar, has been discovered in Herculaneum and is considered to be "the most significant piece of wooden furniture ever discovered there."

Archaeologists uncover Prague's oldest ramparts

Archaeologists have uncovered parts of Prague's oldest ramparts, dating back to the 9th and 10th centuries. The remnants of the wall, which was part of one of Prague's main entrance gates, were discovered in the cellar of the Academy of Performing Arts building.

Six medieval bishops identified in Scotland

Radiocarbon dating was used recently to help identify the remains of six bishops found buried in at Whithorn Priory in Galloway, Scotland. The skulls dated from between 1200-1360 CE. (photos)

50 years of ADS research online

The Archaeology Data Service (ADS) has announced the publication of 50 years of their Medieval Archeology publication on their website.

DNA and linguistic studies show Liverpool's Viking heritage

Researchers believe that the area around Liverpool, England was a Viking settlement. Their findings are based on original surnames and DNA evidence.