Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Northumberland Iron Age dig one of largest ever in NE England

Archaeologists working at the Delhi surface mine in Northumberland, England have unearthed the remains of at least 50 Iron Age houses, making the project one of the largest in northeast England's archaeological history.

From the halls of Montezuma

Mexican archaeologists believe they have, at long last, found the fabled palace of Aztec emperor Montezuma, destroyed by the conquistador Hernando Cortés in 1521.

7th century Lomard buried with horse

Italian archaeologists have discovered the burial site of a Lombard warrior interred with his horse. The skeletons were found n a park at Testona, near Turin, Italy.

Alabaster bust of Cleopatra Discovered in Egyptian Temple

It's a bit early for SCA, but still interesting: A bust of Cleopatra made from alabaster and a mask that may have belonged to Marc Antony are among the many items discovered in the Taposiris Magna temple, north of Alexandria, Egypt.

Scandinavians "genetically diverse" for over 2000 years say researchers

A study of Danish burial grounds dating to the Iron Age by a team of forensic scientists from the University of Copenhagen finds that humans were much more genetically diverse than previously believed.

11st century Jain statue found in Pushkar, India

Archaeologists working on a site near Ajmer, India have discovered a black stone statue of Jain Tirthankar Kuntunath in a meditating posture dating to the 11th century. The statue is one of 36 discovered in old Pushkar in the past year.

Archaeologists search for lost Welsh towns

Two Welsh towns near Carmarthenshire are missing. Records show that they existed in the 14th and 15th centuries, but they have long since disappeared. Now researchers hope to find them within the grounds of Dinefwr Park and Castle near Llandeilo.

"Lost" medieval church of Dunwich found with modern technology

Marine archaeologists believe they have discovered a medieval church which tumbled off an eroded cliff into the ocean in Suffolk County, England. The remains were discovered using sonar and underwater cameras.

Copper Age "Stonehenge of Sevilla" could become supermarket

Castilleja, Spain's mayor Carmelo Cebo does not believe in the value of the 4,500-year-old Copper Age burial site near Sevilla, calling it "just a pile of stones," not worth saving. The site may be destined to be bulldozed to make way for developers.

The mystery of the missing skeletons

Dozens of skeletons, thought to be Muslim and dating from the 8th or 9th centuries C.E, have been removed from the site of excavations near the Temple Mount according to the Israel Antiquities Authority who have deemed the incident "a serious mishap."

Scientists Think Humans Arrived in New Zealand in 1280 C.E.

Scientists studying rat remains and seeds eaten by the rats believe humans did not colonize New Zealand until 1280 C.E. because they could not have swum the distances from the nearest islands.

Search continues for "Lost Colony"

Researchers from the First Colony Foundation are gearing up to begin an extensive search for America's "Lost Colony." The project will be covered by the Time Team America program.

Study finds Stonehenge may have been royal burial ground

Researchers from the University of Sheffield, England, say that radiocarbon dating of remains from Stonehenge suggest that the site was a burial ground for Britain's first royal dynasty, as early as 500 years before the stones were erected.

The Birka Project information online

One of the most impressive archaeological sites for the Viking Age is Birka at Björkö in Lake Mälaren, Sweden. A website describing the site and its artifacts is available online.

Did smallpox kill Gloucester Romans?

Experts working on the recently-discovered mass Roman grave in Gloucester, England will be using DNA tests to determine what killed over 90 individuals. A first look at the remains points to a 2nd century smallpox outbreak that swept across Britain.

Germanic society in England may not have been as brutal as once believed

Recent scientific studies have suggested that the Germanic invaders of England may have imposed an apartheid-like system on the native peoples, but an article by John Pattison of the University of South Australia in Adelaide disagrees. "The evidence is compatible with the idea of a much more integrated society," he says.

Vikings acquitted in ritual killing

New evidence pertaining to the death of a Viking woman found in a ship burial disputes the earlier belief that the woman was ritually murdered. "We have no reason to think violence was the cause of death," Per Holck, professor of anatomy at Oslo University, told Reuters after studying the two women who died in 834 aged about 80 and 50.

Sherwood's "Thynghowe" may be Anglo-Saxon mound

Husband and wife Lynda Mallet and Stuart Reddish discovered a mysterious mound three years ago in Sherwood Forest, Nottingham, England with the help of 19th century maps. Now they believe the site may have been an Anglo-Saxon gathering place.

French Templar tomb found

The remains of a Templar knight have been discovered in a tomb near Rennes-le-Chateau, France along with a cache of gold and coins. The mummified body wore the still-recognizable shroud of the order. (video)

New dig may explain Stonehenge

Just a few weeks after beginning, the excavators now working at Stonehenge have had what they describe as a "breakthrough." Clues towards the original placement of the bluestones, the site's oldest elements, may reveal why Stonehenge was built.

Combs and shears honored Anglo Saxon dead

Archaeologists have long believed that Anglo Saxon burial customs required elaborate displays, but new evidence points to the use of more common devotions such as combs, razors and other household items.

3rd century amulet places Jews in Austria

A gold amulet dating to the 3rd century CE inscribed with a Jewish prayer has been discovered in the grave of a Roman child in Halbturn, Austria proving that people of the Jewish faith inhabited the country at the time.

The Vikings return to Nottingham

The Vikings will return to Nottingham, England April 26, 2008 for From Bones to Berserkers -- Vikings Under the Spotlight, the Midlands Viking Symposium 2008 at The University of Nottingham. The program will include presentations by some of the worlds greatest authorities on Norse and Viking culture.

Roman subway excavations produce wonderful archaeological finds

Archaeologists working at the site of a subway line near the Piazza Venezia in Rome have made some incredible finds including a 6th century copper factory and artifacts from a Renaissance palace kitchen.

"The Quest" follows journey of the Templars

The Quest, a Classic Media Group production, follows the journey of the Knights Templar through Europe by studying the work of archaeologists, anthropologists and historians.

Anglo-Saxon cemetery yields treasure

The discovery of a series of 5th century Anglo Saxon graves in Kent, England has created the need for an inquest before the Kent County Council due to the wealth of artifacts found with the graves.

Rare Anglo-Saxon grave markers found in cathedral walls

Archaeologists are excited about the discovery of rare Anglo-Saxon grace markers in the walls of Peterborough Cathedral. The markers, which are believed to date from the 11th century, were discovered during restoration work to the cathedral.

Reburial for Anglo Saxon remains

A funeral service, spoken in Anglo-Saxon, will be held in North Lincolnshire, England, to re-inter over three thousand skeletons that were discovered there almost three decades ago. The bones were disinterred as part of a study on the history of diseases.

Medieval belt buckle discovered in Scotland

A sewer line breakage in Perth, Scotland, has led to discovery of a copper alloy belt buckle that probably dates back to the 12th century.

Medieval skull and remains found in river

A worker dredging in the River Lark in Suffolk, England, recently found a skull and other human remains from the Middle Ages. The find also included bones from a juvenile and a metal buckle that has been dated to the 14th century.