Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

English crossroads site of Roman well

Archaeolgists have great hopes for a newly-discovered Roman well near Chester, England. The well, located at a crossroads, and several large rock quarries, was found during construction preparation for a Travelodge hotel.

Remains of a Stirling knight

Researchers believe that the skeleton of a young man found at Stirling Castle in Scotland may be those of a knight killed in battle in the early 15th century. The bones were discovered in the castle's chapel in 1997.

Vatican tomb declared that of St. Paul

Remains discovered in 2006 beneath the Vatican have been declared to belong to St.Paul, according to Pope Benedict. The tomb bore the epigraph Paulo Apostolo Mart (Paul the Apostle and Martyr).

600 Sq. Ft., 1,700 Year Roman Old Mosaic Revealed in Israel

Israeli archaeologists have uncovered for public view "one of the largest and best preserved mosaics ever found."

Volunteers find Roman artifacts on first day of dig

An archaeological dig in Lincolnshire, England, which teams professional and volunteers, has led to satisfying results on its first day. Among items found: "Roman coins, flints and walls."

Five medieval skeletons found in Mickleham

Construction work on a new vestry at St Michael's Church in Mickleham, England has led to the discovery of five graves dating from at least the 15th century, one belonging to a small child. The graves are believed to mark the location of the medieval churchyard.

The riddle of the skulls

Archaeologists in Dorset, England are trying to uncover the mystery of a burial pit full of skulls dating to Roman times. The 45 skulls discovered so far all appear to belong to young men.

3rd century skeletons surprise pond builders

Gardeners digging a pond near Mowmacre, England were surprised to find human remains beneath their shovels. The two skeletons have been dated to 3rd century Roman Britain, and were found along with bits of pottery.

Experts continue to debate mystery of Sutton Hoo

Archaeologists agree that the person buried at Sutton Hoo in East Anglia at the beginning of the 7th century must have been a king, but opinions differ on which king he was. New studies seem to indicate that the ship burial held Raedwald, King of east Anglia and King of the Britains.

New Norse settlement found in Canada

Canadian archaeologists are thrilled by the discovery of the remains of a medieval structure, which they believe may be Norse in origin, near Nunavut on southern Baffin Island. If true, this will be only the second Viking structure found in the New World.

Airtight latrine preserves centuries-old broom

Archaeologists are excited about the discovery of a 300-year-old, perfectly-preserved broom in the excavated latrine of the St. Ulrich Church monastery in Paderborn, Germany. (photo)

Landscape tells historical story in English countryside

A spring walk in the English countryside can be a history lesson for careful observers. The Time Team's resident landscape archaeologist, Stewart Ainsworth, offers hints on "How to read landscapes like an archaeologist."

Late Roman village discovered in Austria

The remains of a village, dating to late Roman times, have been discovered at the site of a proposed retirement home in Salzburg, Austria. Archaeologists believe it is the "largest find from that period of history in Salzburg to date."

Face of Mary Rose's bosun revealed

Forensic artist Richard Neave has reconstructed the face of the bosun of the Mary Rose, Henry VIII's flagship sunk over 400 years ago. The head was constructed from a skull recovered from the sunken ship and identified by the whistle found with his remains. (photo)

Byzantine bathhouse excavation continues during rocket attacks

Archaeologists are working amidst rocket-fire to complete the excavation of a Byzantine village, complete with a large bathhouse, near Gaza in Israel. Because of the existence and size of the luxury bathhouse, experts believe that the area was inhabited by wealthy residents.

Crusader castle project could prove value of new technologies

Archaeologist Katharina Galor believes technology might just help eliminate hours of tedious recording and cataloging during a dig, and she plans to test her theory at Apollonia-Arsuf, a crusader castle in Israel.

Vikings were "model immigrants"

A three-day conference at Cambridge University may shake up traditional views of Vikings. The new study will show that, far from marauding barbarians, the Norse were "more cultured settlers who offered a 'good historical model' of immigrant assimilation."

Bulgarian and British team will study early European settlement

Archaeologists from Bulgaria and Great Britain are joining efforts to begin research in the area of the lower Danube River, concentrating on the 5th through 7th centuries. The goal of the project is to study "changes in lifestyle and social life in the transitional period from antiquity to the Middle Ages."

Teenage "witch" to receive Christian burial

Archaeologists in Kent, England have found the remains of a young girl buried in unconsecrated ground beneath a holly tree. They believe that the girl, whose head had been removed and buried beside the body, had been a criminal or accused of witchcraft.

Example of anti-plague burial ritual unearthed in Venice

Archaeologists excavating medieval mass graves in Venice have uncovered a woman buried with a brick in her mouth to stop her chewing on her bloody burial shroud after death, a practice believed at that time to spread the plague.

650-year-old perfume bottle survives the Black Death

Maev Kennedy takes a tour around the treasures of the Black Death exhibition at The Wallace Collection, London, including a tiny perfume bottle that was owned by a victim of a superstitious anti-plague pogrom.

The archaeology of farming

Those interested in the history of farming and agriculture will want to visit Roberta Alunni's website on the Fratticciola Museum of Farming Culture which looks at "parallels between Etruscan and Tuscan agriculture."

California monks reconstruct 800 year old building

Monks at the Abbey of New Clairvaux in Vina, California are rebuilding an 800 year old chapter house transported from Ovila, Spain to California in 1931 by William Randoph Hearst.

Ancient Rome on a budget

The Ancient Coins for Education, Inc. website offers hints for budgeting in ancient Rome the article "What things cost in Ancient Rome ."

Treasures found in 2008

Have metal detector, will travel? It's amazing what can be found with patience and practice, as WTF? Place reports: 10 great archaeological finds for the year 2008.

Archaeologists ponder Pagan mosaic found under cathedral

Three mosaics of tiny tiles, featuring naked people possibly performing pagan rituals, have been unearthed underneath the Cathedral of Reggio Emilia in Italy.

Life in Roman Britain through the eyes of garrison wives

One of the most important aspects of the excavations at England's Vindolana archaeological site is the insight given to everyday life at the fort, especially through the preserved letters of those stationed there. Australia's Couriermail.com has a feature.

Labour Party blamed for England's crumbling treasures

Macer Hall, Political Editor of the Daily News reports that England's Labour Party is being blamed for the sorry state of many of Britain's historic buildings and sites, some of which are considered “at risk” by experts.

Lost church of Bix Gibwyn found in Oxfordshire

Archaeologists are hoping that they have found the location of the "lost" church of Bix Gibwyn, an 800-year-old structure that was abandoned in the late 16th century. The research team has discovered three medieval graves which could pinpoint the site of the church.

Metal detectors cause of 12% rise in discovery of historic artifacts

An Iron Age torc, valued at UK£350,000, is one of the highlights of this year's archaeological discoveries in the UK. The necklace was found near Newark in Nottinghamshire. (photos)