Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Labour Party blamed for England's crumbling treasures

Macer Hall, Political Editor of the Daily News reports that England's Labour Party is being blamed for the sorry state of many of Britain's historic buildings and sites, some of which are considered “at risk” by experts.

Lost church of Bix Gibwyn found in Oxfordshire

Archaeologists are hoping that they have found the location of the "lost" church of Bix Gibwyn, an 800-year-old structure that was abandoned in the late 16th century. The research team has discovered three medieval graves which could pinpoint the site of the church.

Metal detectors cause of 12% rise in discovery of historic artifacts

An Iron Age torc, valued at UK£350,000, is one of the highlights of this year's archaeological discoveries in the UK. The necklace was found near Newark in Nottinghamshire. (photos)

Photos reveal undiscovered features of Hadrian's Wall

Researchers have been poring over more than 30,000 photos taken over the past 60 years for hints to the real nature of Hadrian's Wall. So far, the study has revealed "2,700 previously unrecorded historic features."

Scotland's annual Treasure Trove includes Roman tombstone

Scotland's Crown Office each year gets the honor of collecting rare artifacts discovered by archaeologists, metal detectorists and treasure hunters into a Treasure Trove. This year's finds include a Bronze Age sword and the first Roman tombstone discovered in nearly 200 years.

2nd century bronze chariot found in Bulgaria

A bronze-plated, elaborately-decorated chariot dating to the 2nd century was found recently at an ancient Thracian tomb in southeastern Bulgaria. Experts believe the vehicle was buried as part of the belongings of a wealthy Thracian aristocrat.

Sewer construction unearths Roman and medieval settlements in Cumbria

Sewer construction near Penrith in northern England has uncovered a Roman settlement a mere meter beneath the soil. The project has also unearthed several medieval buildings, including a rare Grubenhauser. (photos)

Ancient Celtic coins found in Dutch cornfield

A cache of 1st century gold and silver coins was found recently by a metal detectorist near the city of Maastricht, Netherlands. The mix of Germanic and Celtic coins. The Celtic treasure is believed to have been minted by a tribe called the Eburones.

Digging up dirt on Martin Luther

German scientists are taking an unusual approach to studying the domestic life of 16th century churchman Martin Luther. They are digging through his garbage.

The spiritual life of the Vikings

Recent discoveries of Viking burial sites have led researchers to rethink previously-held beliefs about the lives of the Norse, especially in regard to their spiritual life.

"New" Vikings enjoyed fashion and poetry

Scholars at Cambridge University feel that Vikings have gotten a bad rep, and they have set out to right it by way of a campaign "to recast them as 'new men' with an interest in grooming, fashion and poetry."

Study of graves gives new insight into early Norse life

New research on excavations of early pagan Norse burial sites has given scholars a new understanding of the lives of the Vikings, especially in regard to their funeral practices.

Archaeologists puzzle over layers of history in Hungary

A 3,500-year-old gravesite, a Roman military camp, and a medieval road are just three of the possibilities archaeologists are exploring at a dig near Rábapatona, Hungary.

Did Norse bring Christianity to Scotland?

A team of archaeologists from the University of Nottingham are trying to determine if Vikings brought Christianity to Caithness, Scotland before Saint Columba brought the religion to Iona. (video)

Fifty years of "Medieval Archaeology" available online

In honor of their fiftieth anniversary of publication, the scholarly journal Medieval Archaeology has made fifty years of articles available on the web in scanned-page format, free for nonprofit research and educational purposes.

Vindolanda site receives funds for museum upgrade

The Roman fort of Vindolanda in northern England will receive UK£4M from the Heritage Lottery. The money will be used to upgrade the museum allowing them space to display many of the Roman site's spectacular discoveries.

"Gateway to the Roman invasion" found

New excavations in Kent, England have uncovered the hard surface of the country's coastline during the first Roman invasion (43 C.E.). The coast would have been two miles from the current coast. Also found: a Roman wall and a medieval dock.

Garum helps date Pompeii volcanic eruption

Garum, a pungent, fish-based seasoning, used in Roman cooking is being used to help precisely date the volcanic eruption that buried the city of Pompeii.

Roman villa found in Budapest

Several months of excavation have unearthed the remains of a second century Roman villa in Budapest, Hungary, thought to be one of the earliest in the country.

Stonehenge dating controversy continues

New research on Stonehenge finds that it is actually older than previously believed. A recent excavation headed by Mike Parker-Pearson, professor of archaeology at Sheffield University, finds the monument to date to 3000 BCE and to have connections to cremation of the dead.

Russian horse tomb stumps archaeologists

The discovery of a 14th century tomb at Staraya Russa holding the remains of 14 horses puzzles archaeologists. The experts feel the site was not used for slaughter or rituals, but have no other explanation for the mass grave.

Vikings needed women!

New research may show that the Viking raids of the 8th through 11th centuries may have been triggered by a shortage of marriageable women, possibly brought on by the Norsemen themselves.

Roman bones found near Fosse Way

Several ancient graves were found recently near Leicestershire, England containing the remains of several humans believed to have been Roman. The graves were found near the Roman Fosse Way.

Lakenheath dig reveals 450 Saxon graves

Over 400 graves dating to the Saxon period have been discovered at the site of a road project near the RAF facility Lakenheath in Suffolk, England.

Russian archaeologists find Khazar capital

Archaeologists from Astrakhan State University believe they have discovered the long-lost capital of the Khazar kingdom in southern Russia. The Khazars were a semi-nomadic people who converted to Judaism between the 8th and 10th centuries.

Lifestyles of the rich and Roman

A new exhibit on life in a Roman villa is now open at the Complesso di San Nicolo in Ravenna, Italy. Titled Otium: The Art of Living in the Roman House of the Imperial Age, the exhibit includes frescos, mosaics and over 100 household items.

14th century cemetery found in Berlin

Workers at a building site in central Berlin have stumbled across a huge medieval cemetery containing 2,000 bodies dating to the 14th century. Many of the remains are those of children.

Female remains found in Newcastle Roman sarcophagus

Archaeologists working on a burial site near Newcastle, England, have opened a pair of sarcophagi, one containing the remains of a child, and the other the remains of a woman. The site is believed to have been a former chapel near Hadrian's wall dating to the 4th century C.E. (video)

Vikings not driven from Canada by the Thule

New research shows that Viking settlers in Newfoundland were not driven from the country by the native Thule, a native ancestor of the Inuits. Scientific re-dating has placed the native tribes in the area 150 years after the Viking settlements.

Carmelite friars graves found in Perth

A team of archaeologists have discovered the over 50 skeletons dating to the 13th century, of Carmelite friars and other later burials. The remains were found at the future site of retail units in Perth Scotland. The experts have also uncovered the site of the friary church.