Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Big Viking hoard in Britain may rewrite the history books

Metal detectorists in England have found a new Viking treasure hoard that is thought to be the most important discovery of this type in 150 years.

Sweden's oldest burial ship found

Archaeologists working on a site near Sunnerby on the island of Kållandsö in Lake Vänern in central Sweden have discovered a 7th century burial ship, the oldest yet uncovered in Scandinavia. The discovery includes animal sacrifices and burial gifts.

Amateur archaeologists drawn to Vindolanda

For over 200 years, archaeologists have been digging at Vindolanda, the 3rd-4th century Roman fort in the north of England. Now volunteers can try their hand at archaeology -- and still find artifacts. (audio)

The things you find in bogs!

In an article for Wired Science, reporter Alexis Madriga ponders the sorts of things that have been found in peat bogs, including canoes, bodies, murder weapons and barrels of butter. (photos)

Tomb of Bulgarian princess found

A team of archaeologists working in Veliko Turnovo, Bulgaria’s medieval capital, have discovered the tomb of what they believe is a 14th century Bulgarian princess.

Well-preserved Kaupang found in western Norway

A team of Norwegian archaeologists has discovered a well-preserved Kaupang (Viking trading post) in Lærdal, Sogn og Fjordane County in western Norway. The site includes the remains of more than 30 buildings. (drawing)

1,000-year-old tree mark discovered in Prague

Archaeologists have discovered a star-shaped tree mark near Celakovice in the Czech Republic. The mark, probably the oldest such mark ever discovered, is believed to have marked territory.

Fountain project reveals medieval treasures in Peterborough

A project to install fountains in Peterborough, England's Cathedral Square has given archaeologists a glimpse of life in the medieval town. "We have found a whole manner of objects, from coins to really chunky old door keys," said city museum archaeologist Ben Robinson.

Tram workers discover skeletons on Leith Walk

Construction workers in Edinburgh, Scotland have discovered the site of a medieval graveyard at the junction of London Road and Elm Row. An archaeological team has been sent in to catalog and remove the remains.

Archaeologists search for the tomb of Suleiman I

A team of Hungarian and Turkish experts has begun the search for the tomb of Suleiman I, the Lawgiver, who died in Hungary in 1566.

Database catalogs soldiers' records from Hundred Years War

A new web site provides searchable databases of the detailed service records of 250,000 medieval soldiers, including archers who served with Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt.

"Soldier in later Medieval England" online database

This web site, created by Dr. Adrian Bell of the ICMA Centre and Professor Anne Curry of the University of Southampton (UK) and funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, catalogs all known service records for soldiers in the Hundred Years War between 1369 and 1453 CE.

Researchers seek identity of 51 beheaded bodies from 10th century England

Archaeologists are continuing to study 51 bodies that were apparently buried naked, with their heads stacked to the side, on a prominent hillside between 890 and 1034 C.E.

Paper studies domestic animals in medieval Scotland

Dogs, cats and horses in the Scottish medieval town, a scholarly paper by Catherine Smith, looks at the presence of domesticated animals in medieval life. The paper studies recent discoveries at archaeological sites.

English crossroads site of Roman well

Archaeolgists have great hopes for a newly-discovered Roman well near Chester, England. The well, located at a crossroads, and several large rock quarries, was found during construction preparation for a Travelodge hotel.

Remains of a Stirling knight

Researchers believe that the skeleton of a young man found at Stirling Castle in Scotland may be those of a knight killed in battle in the early 15th century. The bones were discovered in the castle's chapel in 1997.

Vatican tomb declared that of St. Paul

Remains discovered in 2006 beneath the Vatican have been declared to belong to St.Paul, according to Pope Benedict. The tomb bore the epigraph Paulo Apostolo Mart (Paul the Apostle and Martyr).

600 Sq. Ft., 1,700 Year Roman Old Mosaic Revealed in Israel

Israeli archaeologists have uncovered for public view "one of the largest and best preserved mosaics ever found."

Volunteers find Roman artifacts on first day of dig

An archaeological dig in Lincolnshire, England, which teams professional and volunteers, has led to satisfying results on its first day. Among items found: "Roman coins, flints and walls."

Five medieval skeletons found in Mickleham

Construction work on a new vestry at St Michael's Church in Mickleham, England has led to the discovery of five graves dating from at least the 15th century, one belonging to a small child. The graves are believed to mark the location of the medieval churchyard.

The riddle of the skulls

Archaeologists in Dorset, England are trying to uncover the mystery of a burial pit full of skulls dating to Roman times. The 45 skulls discovered so far all appear to belong to young men.

3rd century skeletons surprise pond builders

Gardeners digging a pond near Mowmacre, England were surprised to find human remains beneath their shovels. The two skeletons have been dated to 3rd century Roman Britain, and were found along with bits of pottery.

Experts continue to debate mystery of Sutton Hoo

Archaeologists agree that the person buried at Sutton Hoo in East Anglia at the beginning of the 7th century must have been a king, but opinions differ on which king he was. New studies seem to indicate that the ship burial held Raedwald, King of east Anglia and King of the Britains.

New Norse settlement found in Canada

Canadian archaeologists are thrilled by the discovery of the remains of a medieval structure, which they believe may be Norse in origin, near Nunavut on southern Baffin Island. If true, this will be only the second Viking structure found in the New World.

Airtight latrine preserves centuries-old broom

Archaeologists are excited about the discovery of a 300-year-old, perfectly-preserved broom in the excavated latrine of the St. Ulrich Church monastery in Paderborn, Germany. (photo)

Landscape tells historical story in English countryside

A spring walk in the English countryside can be a history lesson for careful observers. The Time Team's resident landscape archaeologist, Stewart Ainsworth, offers hints on "How to read landscapes like an archaeologist."

Late Roman village discovered in Austria

The remains of a village, dating to late Roman times, have been discovered at the site of a proposed retirement home in Salzburg, Austria. Archaeologists believe it is the "largest find from that period of history in Salzburg to date."

Face of Mary Rose's bosun revealed

Forensic artist Richard Neave has reconstructed the face of the bosun of the Mary Rose, Henry VIII's flagship sunk over 400 years ago. The head was constructed from a skull recovered from the sunken ship and identified by the whistle found with his remains. (photo)

Byzantine bathhouse excavation continues during rocket attacks

Archaeologists are working amidst rocket-fire to complete the excavation of a Byzantine village, complete with a large bathhouse, near Gaza in Israel. Because of the existence and size of the luxury bathhouse, experts believe that the area was inhabited by wealthy residents.

Crusader castle project could prove value of new technologies

Archaeologist Katharina Galor believes technology might just help eliminate hours of tedious recording and cataloging during a dig, and she plans to test her theory at Apollonia-Arsuf, a crusader castle in Israel.