Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Byzantine grave site found in Syria

A joint team of Syrian and Japanese archaeologists have discovered the graves of children dating to the 6th century in the ancient city of Palmyra. A wealthy city along the caravan route, Palmyra was known as the Bride of the Desert.

Controversy surrounds Dracula's cellar

Archaeologists have discovered what they believe is the basement of ”Drakulya House,” owned by Vlad III Tepes, more commonly known as Dracula, in the Hungarian city of Pécs, but authorities plan to fill in the excavation for preservation purposes.

"High status" Saxon brooch found in South Oxfordshire

Metal detectorists at a rally in South Oxfordshire have discovered a 6th century Saxon grave yielding a skull and a garnet brooch belonging to some of "high status."

Staffordshire hoard will "reshape understanding of the Dark Ages"

The recent discovery of over 1500 Anglo-Saxon artifacts near Staffordshire, England is having an amazing impact - and not just on the archaeological community. Thousands of everyday citizens are lining up to get a look at the 7th to 8th century treasure, and displaying a new curiosity about their Anglo-Saxon heritage.

Decapitated skeletons may have been Viking raiders

New studies of the recent discovery of 51 decapitated skeletons found in an old quarry at Ridgeway Hill, near Weymouth, England, may show that the young men were captured Viking raiders who were executed and buried in a mass grave.

Amateur treasure hunter finds 'seven figure' haul of Anglo-Saxon gold

The largest haul of Anglo-Saxon gold ever found has been discovered by a metal detector enthusiast on farmland in Staffordshire, it was revealed recently.

Roman skeleton really Goth

The 5th century skeleton of a man, discovered in 1972 in Gloucester, England, has been identified as a Goth, originating from east of the Danube River. Experts feel that the man was most likely a Roman soldier.

Bones of unidentified saint found in Bulgarian cathedral

Archaeologists working at the site of a medieval church, part of the fortress of Perperikon in Bulgaria, have discovered a bronze cross bearing remains dating to the 5th-7th centuries C.E. "These are broken and decayed bones, most definitely of a saint," Professor Ovcharov said.

Visitors invited to view processing of Anglo-Saxon grave finds

Visitors to the town of Sittingbourne, England have a rare opportunity to watch the processing of artifacts from an Anglo-Saxon burial site. (photos and video)

Abbasid Period village found in Qatar

A joint team of French and Qatari archaeologists is excited about the discovery of a 9th century town, "a remarkable village of 220 houses, two forts and two mosques," buried for centuries beneath the sands of northwest Qatar.

Murder or execution in Venta Icenorum?

"This is an abnormal burial," said archaeologist Will Bowden of the University of Nottingham, about the discovery of a male skeleton, buried with his hands tied behind his back. "It could be that the person was murdered or executed, although this is still a matter of speculation." (photo)

Roman military camps found on Austrian amber road

The discovery of three Roman military camps "will rewrite the history of the Romans in Austria," said Stefan Groh, the leader of the Austrian Archeological Institute team which discovered the camps near Strebersdorf. The sites were found on the amber road, the ancient trading route which runs through the country.

Lost settlement of Argall Towne found

Alain Outlaw of Archaeological & Cultural Solutions, has been looking for Argall Towne since 1975. The elusive, short-lived settlement was started in 1617 near Jamestown, Virginia, by Capt. Samuel Argall, best known for kidnapping Pocahontas in 1613.

Hadrian's wall cemetery to be excavated

Excavation has begun on "the first systematic excavation of a cemetery on Hadrian's Wall," a Roman cremation cemetery which is part of the World Heritage Site at Birdoswald Fort, Cumbri.

Huge Anglo-Saxon gold hoard found

The BBC is reporting on a treasure find in England that rivals that of the Sutton Hoo burial, if not in quality then certainly in quantity.

3D footprint of Colchester Circus proposed

Philip Crummy, director of the Colchester Archaeological Trust, which in 2004 discovered the location of the Colchester, England Roman Circus, reports that a proposal has been created to mark the dimensions of the site with a "three dimensional representation on the site of the circus footprint."

Paisley loo is archaeologists' dream

“What’s unusual is that it hasn’t been messed with. This is a loo that hasn’t been flushed for 500 years. We have a kind of sealed environment, containing artefacts like the earliest known piece of Scottish music, which we found scratched into pieces of slate," said archaeology professor Steven Driscoll of the recent excavation of a 15th century Scottish sanitation drain.

"Presenting the Roman Frontiers – Communicating the Evidence" at Newcastle University

A group of over 300 international specialists on Roman archaeology met recently at Newcastle University to discuss Roman frontier heritage sites and how they are presented to the public.

Reporter searches for allure of archaeology in Clunia, Spain

According to Mark Piesing of The Guardian, volunteering on the late Roman archaeological site in Clunia, Spain leaves one feeling more like Gil Grissom than Indiana Jones, yet volunteering for digs is more popular than ever. Piesing set off to find out why.

Big Viking hoard in Britain may rewrite the history books

Metal detectorists in England have found a new Viking treasure hoard that is thought to be the most important discovery of this type in 150 years.

Sweden's oldest burial ship found

Archaeologists working on a site near Sunnerby on the island of Kållandsö in Lake Vänern in central Sweden have discovered a 7th century burial ship, the oldest yet uncovered in Scandinavia. The discovery includes animal sacrifices and burial gifts.

Amateur archaeologists drawn to Vindolanda

For over 200 years, archaeologists have been digging at Vindolanda, the 3rd-4th century Roman fort in the north of England. Now volunteers can try their hand at archaeology -- and still find artifacts. (audio)

The things you find in bogs!

In an article for Wired Science, reporter Alexis Madriga ponders the sorts of things that have been found in peat bogs, including canoes, bodies, murder weapons and barrels of butter. (photos)

Tomb of Bulgarian princess found

A team of archaeologists working in Veliko Turnovo, Bulgaria’s medieval capital, have discovered the tomb of what they believe is a 14th century Bulgarian princess.

Well-preserved Kaupang found in western Norway

A team of Norwegian archaeologists has discovered a well-preserved Kaupang (Viking trading post) in Lærdal, Sogn og Fjordane County in western Norway. The site includes the remains of more than 30 buildings. (drawing)

1,000-year-old tree mark discovered in Prague

Archaeologists have discovered a star-shaped tree mark near Celakovice in the Czech Republic. The mark, probably the oldest such mark ever discovered, is believed to have marked territory.

Fountain project reveals medieval treasures in Peterborough

A project to install fountains in Peterborough, England's Cathedral Square has given archaeologists a glimpse of life in the medieval town. "We have found a whole manner of objects, from coins to really chunky old door keys," said city museum archaeologist Ben Robinson.

Tram workers discover skeletons on Leith Walk

Construction workers in Edinburgh, Scotland have discovered the site of a medieval graveyard at the junction of London Road and Elm Row. An archaeological team has been sent in to catalog and remove the remains.

Archaeologists search for the tomb of Suleiman I

A team of Hungarian and Turkish experts has begun the search for the tomb of Suleiman I, the Lawgiver, who died in Hungary in 1566.

Database catalogs soldiers' records from Hundred Years War

A new web site provides searchable databases of the detailed service records of 250,000 medieval soldiers, including archers who served with Henry V at the Battle of Agincourt.