Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Byzantine-era road uncovered in Jerusalem

The Madaba Map, a mosaic depicting 6th-7th century Jerusalem, shows Cardo Street in the Jewish Quarter of the Old City. Now, the Byzantine-era street has been discovered by archaeologists.

Evidence of pre-Islamic society found in Ghana

Archaeologists working on a site near the village of Yikpabongo in the western African country of Ghana have discovered dozens of clay figures depicting people and animals dating from the 7th to 13th centuries. They believe the artifacts are evidence of a pre-Islamic society.

Auning Woman: "a perfectly ordinary looking woman"

Experts at the Panum Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark have shown the world the face of the 2000-year-old Auning Woman, found in 1886 in a northeastern Jutland bog.

Mona Lisa identity may cause da Vinci exhumation

A team of experts from Italy’s National Committee for Cultural Heritage are requesting permission to exhume the remains of Leonardo da Vinci in hopes of revealing the real identity of the Mona Lisa.

11th century Viking house found in Dublin

Workers for the Office of Public Works (OPW) in Dublin, Ireland have unearthed evidence of an 11th century Viking settlement on the north shore of the Liffey River.

Lecture series on the ancient world at University of Southern California and Getty Villa

VCAW-IMI (Visual Culture of the Ancient World & International Museum Institute at USC) will present a lecture series dealing with the ancient world in March and April 2010. The lectures will take place at USC and at the Getty Villa.

Burial a "glimpse into Sleaford's Roman past"

Recent archaeological finds in the town of Sleaford, England prove that the town "was a very large and important settlement in the Roman period." Among the discoveries were the skeleton of a 4th century woman.

Bog People subject of new book

In a review for The Telegraph, Philip Hoare looks at Bodies in the Bog and the Archaeological Imagination, a book by University of California, Berkeley professor Karin Sanders.

Joan of Arc "relics" trace to ancient Egypt

Devotees of Joan of Arc were disppointed recently to learn that relices of Joan of Arc, overseen by the Archbishop of Tours in Chinon, France, are not only fake, but actually the "bones of a human and a cat tracing back to ancient Egypt."

300 early medieval graves found near Paris

Archaeologists working in Noisy-le-Grand, a suburb of Paris, have discovered two burial grounds dating to Merovingian and Carolingian times. The site is believed to contain more than 300 graves.

Strength of medieval women verified by bone study

Recent analysis of skeletons from Wharram Percy, a village on the Yorkshire Wolds, shows that the thick bones of the medieval women demonstrated a life of hard labor which built up their strength.

Broken pipes wreak havoc with medieval remains in York

A broken water main near the medieval burial site in York city centre washed human remains into the street on Christmas Day. The flooding occurred next to All Saints Church, where parisoners have been buried since the Nomrna Conquest.

4th century Roman grave found in Hungary

A team of archaeologists have discovered a grave dating to the last period of Roman occupation in the northwest Hungarian province of Pannonia. The age of the grave was determined by a bone comb found in it.

Medieval remains and pottery found in Georgia monastery

Archaeologists working on the excavation at the church of Ayios Nikolaos, on the site of the 10th century Georgian Monastery, at Gialia village in Paphos, have discovered four ossuaries containing human remains.

Roman city found in Libya

Italian archaeologists have discovered a buried Roman city near the city of Tobruk in Libya. Remnants of the city were found beneath sand dunes, leading experts to believe that a large part of the city sank.

Robert Ballard finds Byzantine ship in the Aegean

A 60 Minutes segment on underwater explorer Robert Ballard includes a discussion of the discovered wreck a 7th century Byzantine ship in the Aegean Sea.

Remains of Pere el Gran found in Tarragona, Spain

A team of archaeologists at the Santa Maria de Santes Creus monastery in Tarragona, Spain have used non-intrusive methods to investigate the tomb of Pere el Gran (1240-1285), one of the country's most important rulers. (video)

Heian Period makeup kit found in Japan

A makeup kit, which includes scissors and tweezers, dating to the Heian Period (794-1192), has been discovered in a tomb in Nishiwaki, Japan. (photo)

Shakespeare's New Place to be excavated

Archaeologists in Stratford-upon-Avon are preparing to excavate the New Place, the remains of Shakespeare's last home.

Pictish throne marks beginning of early Scottish research project

A throne, commissioned by distillers Glenmorangie and National Museums Scotland, and patterned after stone designs by the ancient picts, has become the symbol of a new research project to study Scotland's early history (photo)

Search for tomb of Genghis Khan continues

Traditionally, the grave of Mongol leader Genghis Khan, who died in 1227, was kept secret to keep enemies from desecrating it, and for years archaeologists have sought to find it. Now a new expedition hopes to discover a veritable "Mongolian Valley of the Kings."

Experts suggest alternate site for Battle of Bosworth

For nearly the 500 years since it took place, experts have disputed the location of the Battle of Bosworth which saw the defeat of Richard III. Now a team of historians and archaeologists believe they have found the site.

Old Norse mythology "captures the public imagination"

Experts on Old Norse mythology met recently at the University of Aberdeen's Centre for Scandinavian Studies to take a look a fresh look at the religion.

Byzantine grave site found in Syria

A joint team of Syrian and Japanese archaeologists have discovered the graves of children dating to the 6th century in the ancient city of Palmyra. A wealthy city along the caravan route, Palmyra was known as the Bride of the Desert.

Controversy surrounds Dracula's cellar

Archaeologists have discovered what they believe is the basement of ”Drakulya House,” owned by Vlad III Tepes, more commonly known as Dracula, in the Hungarian city of Pécs, but authorities plan to fill in the excavation for preservation purposes.

"High status" Saxon brooch found in South Oxfordshire

Metal detectorists at a rally in South Oxfordshire have discovered a 6th century Saxon grave yielding a skull and a garnet brooch belonging to some of "high status."

Staffordshire hoard will "reshape understanding of the Dark Ages"

The recent discovery of over 1500 Anglo-Saxon artifacts near Staffordshire, England is having an amazing impact - and not just on the archaeological community. Thousands of everyday citizens are lining up to get a look at the 7th to 8th century treasure, and displaying a new curiosity about their Anglo-Saxon heritage.

Decapitated skeletons may have been Viking raiders

New studies of the recent discovery of 51 decapitated skeletons found in an old quarry at Ridgeway Hill, near Weymouth, England, may show that the young men were captured Viking raiders who were executed and buried in a mass grave.

Amateur treasure hunter finds 'seven figure' haul of Anglo-Saxon gold

The largest haul of Anglo-Saxon gold ever found has been discovered by a metal detector enthusiast on farmland in Staffordshire, it was revealed recently.

Roman skeleton really Goth

The 5th century skeleton of a man, discovered in 1972 in Gloucester, England, has been identified as a Goth, originating from east of the Danube River. Experts feel that the man was most likely a Roman soldier.