Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Mary Rose artifacts on display for the first time

In late 2009, previously unseen artifacts found on the Mary Rose, Henry VIII's flagship, were put on display at the Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. The artifacts will be included in the exhibits at the new Mary Rose Museum scheduled to open in 2012. (photos)

Artifacts tell story of early colonial life

The website Virtual Jamestown includes a gallery of photos of artifacts found at the Jamestown site. The gallery includes large images and rotating clips of each of the artifacts in the collection.

Large medieval treasure found in Kastritsi floor

Bulgarian archaeologists are thrilled by the discovery of "one of the largest medieval treasures in recent times" embedded in the floor of a building in the medieval city of Kastritsi in Euxinograd.

Saxon boat uncovered in England

A Saxon-era boat has been discovered during flood defense construction along the River Ant in Norfolk, England.

Time Team and students aid in investigation of medieval hospital

The South Yorkshire town of Bawtry, England, became a center of archaeological interest recently when excavation of a disused car part revealed a dozen skeletons dating to the 14th century.

"Significant" Roman find in Caistor, England

Archaeologists excavating a derelict pub in Caistor, England say they have a "significant" find with the discovery of a 4th century Roman cemetery containing over forty bodies. Orientation and lack of grave goods leads experts to believe the burials were Christian.

Dry weather reveals Roman history in Great Britain

The dry summer of 2010 in Great Britain has been a help to archaeologists as it revealed hundreds of archaeological sites through "cropmarks," the landscape markings prodcued by crops growing over buried buildings.

Roman lantern found in England

An intact Roman lantern has been found in a farm field in Sudbury, Suffolk, England. The lantern is made of bronze and dates to between the 1st and 3rd centuy CE.

English archaeological event involves entire village

Kibworth, England might never be the same, thanks to BBC Four which filmed the series Story of England, presented by the historian Michael Wood, based on a massive archaeological dig involving over 200 residents of the village.

Roman industrial estate found in North Yorkshire

Archaeologists working on a dig in North Yorkshire, England have discovered a Roman industrial estate believed to have been used by the Ninth Hispanic legion.

Time Team hopes to find Boudica's hometown

Archaeologists, including a team from Channel 4's Time Team, are set to sift through layers of history in search of evidence linking the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, near Norwich, England, to the settlement of East Anglia's Iceni queen Boudica.

Scottish royal murder scene excavated

For the first time in centuries, the 16th century site in Edinburgh, Scotland where Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, was killed, is being excavated. Darnley was the second husband of Mary, Queen of Scots.

Archeologists discover trace of unknown Peruvian language

Archeologists digging at Magdalena de Cao Viejo in Peru have found a letter written in the eary 17th century by a Spanish colonist. On the back of the letter is a list of numbers written in Spanish, Arabic numerals, and an unknown language.

Vikings turned profits in Canadian Arctic

Patricia Sutherland of the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Ottawa knows that Vikings traveled to North America. The Vikings of her area of interest, however, were not in the New World to colonize, but to make a quick profit.

"Archwilio" maps Welsh archaeological sites

Welsh heritage minister Alun Ffred Jones has announced the creation of the website Archwilio, an online database mapping archaeological sites and discoveries across the country.

Greek murder victim in "wrong place at wrong time"

Sandra Garvie-Lok really likes her job, even though it requires she help investigate a 1500-year-old murder. The victim, John Doe, is believed to have been a witness to the Slavic invasion of the Greek city of Nemea during the Byzantine era.

Silver hoard found in Bulgaria

Archeologists have discovered a cache of 166 silver coins hidden in a jar in the floor of a medieval home. The home is within the fortress of Kastritsi.

Medieval skeletons found underneath parking lot

Archaeologists working in Bawtry, South Yorkshire, England, have unearthed dozens of skeletons dating to the 14th century. The skeletons are of all ages and are thought to be interred in a formal cemetery, possibly belonging to a hospital that was once thought to exist on the site.

Early Tamil incscription found

A 13th century grain jug unearthed near Ranipet, India has the earliest example of Tamil script on a clay vessle. The 3-foot tall jug, called a granary, also depicts an elephant, a cow, and a scene of a woman giving birth.

Mayan royal tomb found

The well-sealed tomb of a Mayan king has offered a treasure trove of new information for scholars. Archaeologists at El Zotz in Guatemala found the tomb in May, but kept their discovery secret until recently in an effort to protect the find from looters.

Infant remains may indicate Roman brothel

Archaeologists working on the excavation of a Roman villa in the Thames Valley of England are looking for an explanation for a mass burial of 97 infants, all having died soon after birth. Experts believe the site may have been a brothel.

Oxfordshire balloonist spots Bronze Age sites

Drought and extreme heat in England have made it possible to see ancient sites normally hidden by vegetation. Balloonist Michael Wolf saw dark circles in a farmer's field and realized these were evidence of Bronze Age burial mounds.

12th century children's bow found in Russia

A small bow, believed to have been a toy for a child, was found in an excavation in Staraya, Novgorod Region, Russia. A tiny arrow was also found nearby.

Byzantine church unearthed in Turkey

A well preserved Byzantine church has been found in Demre, Turkey, the sity of the ancient city of Myre.

Iceland's early settlers cause scholarly debate

Icelandic scholars are still debating who the country's first settlers actually were. Tradition states that Ingólfur and Hjörleifur were the first settlers, but new evidence may show that 870, the date of their arrival, may not be correct.

Archaeologists excavate London's first theatre

Archeologists are excavating "The Theater", London's first known successful playhouse, where it is believed that Shakespeare himself worked and may have even acted. The building was completed in 1576, and historians believe that Romeo and Juliet premiered there.

Skeletons, weapons, clothes found from Thirty Year's War

Two skeletons and other artifacts dating to the Thirty Years War were found in Stralsund, Germany. Muskets engraved with the owners initials have helped identify the bodies as Hapsburg soldiers.

Archaeologists look for evidence of 1630s war in Connecticut

Researchers are scouring backyards in suburban Mystic, Connecticut, looking for remains of the Pequot War. They hope to use artifacts to help map the location of the battlefields.

Harald Bluetooth's palace found in Jutland

Archaeologists from Århus University have discovered the remains of 10th century wooden buildings which they believe are from the palace complex of King Harald Bluetooth, King of Denmark from 940 to 985, in Jelling.

Shakespeare: clues from the rubbish tip

Archaeologists believe they have identified Shakespeare's cesspit on the property of New Place, his home in Stratford-upon-Avon. They now hope to find clues to the playwright's life among the rubbish from a dig.