Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

14th century remains give "fascinating insight" into Fenwick history

The discovery of a grave dating to the 13th or 14th century may provide a link to a medieval settlement that existed at West Fenwick, England.

International Vinland-seminar

We are pleased to announce the International Vinland-seminar in Chicago, a three day event dedicated to the Norse discovery of America and Scandinavian Viking Culture, 15th – 17th October 2010.

Saxon artifact puzzles experts

Microscopes, X-rays and CAT scans have, so far, been used to identify a recent discovery of a Saxon object from an archaeological dig at The Meads in Kent, with no results. The circular silver, bronze and wooden disk is believed to be a mount, but no one is sure. (photos)

Graveyard of ships found in Baltic Sea

Workers constructing a gas pipeline in the Baltic Sea between Russia and Germany have discovered a graveyard of a dozen shipwrecked vessels, some dating to the Middle Ages.

"Dead Cities" offer glimpse into Byzantine life

The "Dead Cities" of northern Syria, actually suburbs of Antioch, were deserted in the 7th-10th centuries after continual natural disasters and warfare. Now the remains of over 100 small towns are giving insight into life in the Byzantine Empire.

Plea made to acquire Staffordshire Hoard

In January 2010, a public appeal was made to raise money to build buy the Staffordshire Hoard, considered the "most important find ever" from the Anglo-Saxon era. The appeal was made to raise UK£3.3m to pay the finder of the Hoard and the owner of the land.

Brain of a medieval child found in France

Scientists have found a 13th century preserved brain, complete with intact neurons and brain cells, inside the skull of an 18-month old child found in northwestern France.

British ponder mystery of Richard II

A visit to Westminster Abbey will show visitors the tomb of King Richard II - or will it? Researchers are wondering if tests on remains found at a former Dominican friary in Stirling, Scotland might determine them to be those of the 14th century king.

Magdeburg excavation reveals remains of Barbarossa's adviser

Excavations at Magdeburg Cathedral have revealed the grave which experts believe is that of Archbishop Wichmann von Seeburg, a key adviser to Holy Roman Emperor Frederick Barbaross, who died in the late 12th century. (photo)

Medieval fortress rising in Ozark hills

Amateur archaeologist and inventor Michel Guyot, the master-mind behind the renovation of Château of Saint Fargeau in France, is constructing a medieval fortress in Lead Hill, Arkansas. The project's web site has updated photos.

York's "Ivory Bangle Lady" of African origin

Recent analysis of a Roman burial in the city of York show that the remains belonged to a "high status" woman of African origin. Dubbed the "Ivory Bangle Lady," the woman was buried in the late 4th century along with "items including jet and elephant ivory bracelets, earrings, beads and a blue glass jug." (photos)

British Museum to host York treasures

A stunning collection of artifacts from the Yorkshire Museum will be given a place of honor at the British Museum in London for the exhibition The Treasures of Medieval York: England’s Other Capital until summer 2010.

Beheaded Vikings found at London Olympics site

Excavation work in preparation for the 2012 Olympic Games in London has uncovered the bodies of 51 Vikings who were beheaded and thrown into a mass grave.

Experts believe they have found true site of Battle of Bosworth Field

A new study of documents, artifacts, and archaeological surveys seem to prove the true location of the Battle of Bosworth, the site of the death of King Richard of England. (map & photo)

Medieval Irish abbots lived "life of O'Riley"

Ongoing excavations on the grounds of Rothe House in Kilkenny, Ireland, have discovered that Cistercian abbots, who had a previous residence at the site, lived a lavish lifestyle of roast swan and French wine.

Byzantine-era road uncovered in Jerusalem

The Madaba Map, a mosaic depicting 6th-7th century Jerusalem, shows Cardo Street in the Jewish Quarter of the Old City. Now, the Byzantine-era street has been discovered by archaeologists.

Evidence of pre-Islamic society found in Ghana

Archaeologists working on a site near the village of Yikpabongo in the western African country of Ghana have discovered dozens of clay figures depicting people and animals dating from the 7th to 13th centuries. They believe the artifacts are evidence of a pre-Islamic society.

Auning Woman: "a perfectly ordinary looking woman"

Experts at the Panum Institute in Copenhagen, Denmark have shown the world the face of the 2000-year-old Auning Woman, found in 1886 in a northeastern Jutland bog.

Mona Lisa identity may cause da Vinci exhumation

A team of experts from Italy’s National Committee for Cultural Heritage are requesting permission to exhume the remains of Leonardo da Vinci in hopes of revealing the real identity of the Mona Lisa.

11th century Viking house found in Dublin

Workers for the Office of Public Works (OPW) in Dublin, Ireland have unearthed evidence of an 11th century Viking settlement on the north shore of the Liffey River.

Lecture series on the ancient world at University of Southern California and Getty Villa

VCAW-IMI (Visual Culture of the Ancient World & International Museum Institute at USC) will present a lecture series dealing with the ancient world in March and April 2010. The lectures will take place at USC and at the Getty Villa.

Burial a "glimpse into Sleaford's Roman past"

Recent archaeological finds in the town of Sleaford, England prove that the town "was a very large and important settlement in the Roman period." Among the discoveries were the skeleton of a 4th century woman.

Bog People subject of new book

In a review for The Telegraph, Philip Hoare looks at Bodies in the Bog and the Archaeological Imagination, a book by University of California, Berkeley professor Karin Sanders.

Joan of Arc "relics" trace to ancient Egypt

Devotees of Joan of Arc were disppointed recently to learn that relices of Joan of Arc, overseen by the Archbishop of Tours in Chinon, France, are not only fake, but actually the "bones of a human and a cat tracing back to ancient Egypt."

300 early medieval graves found near Paris

Archaeologists working in Noisy-le-Grand, a suburb of Paris, have discovered two burial grounds dating to Merovingian and Carolingian times. The site is believed to contain more than 300 graves.

Strength of medieval women verified by bone study

Recent analysis of skeletons from Wharram Percy, a village on the Yorkshire Wolds, shows that the thick bones of the medieval women demonstrated a life of hard labor which built up their strength.

Broken pipes wreak havoc with medieval remains in York

A broken water main near the medieval burial site in York city centre washed human remains into the street on Christmas Day. The flooding occurred next to All Saints Church, where parisoners have been buried since the Nomrna Conquest.

4th century Roman grave found in Hungary

A team of archaeologists have discovered a grave dating to the last period of Roman occupation in the northwest Hungarian province of Pannonia. The age of the grave was determined by a bone comb found in it.

Medieval remains and pottery found in Georgia monastery

Archaeologists working on the excavation at the church of Ayios Nikolaos, on the site of the 10th century Georgian Monastery, at Gialia village in Paphos, have discovered four ossuaries containing human remains.

Roman city found in Libya

Italian archaeologists have discovered a buried Roman city near the city of Tobruk in Libya. Remnants of the city were found beneath sand dunes, leading experts to believe that a large part of the city sank.