Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Archaeologists excavate London's first theatre

Archeologists are excavating "The Theater", London's first known successful playhouse, where it is believed that Shakespeare himself worked and may have even acted. The building was completed in 1576, and historians believe that Romeo and Juliet premiered there.

Skeletons, weapons, clothes found from Thirty Year's War

Two skeletons and other artifacts dating to the Thirty Years War were found in Stralsund, Germany. Muskets engraved with the owners initials have helped identify the bodies as Hapsburg soldiers.

Archaeologists look for evidence of 1630s war in Connecticut

Researchers are scouring backyards in suburban Mystic, Connecticut, looking for remains of the Pequot War. They hope to use artifacts to help map the location of the battlefields.

Harald Bluetooth's palace found in Jutland

Archaeologists from Århus University have discovered the remains of 10th century wooden buildings which they believe are from the palace complex of King Harald Bluetooth, King of Denmark from 940 to 985, in Jelling.

Shakespeare: clues from the rubbish tip

Archaeologists believe they have identified Shakespeare's cesspit on the property of New Place, his home in Stratford-upon-Avon. They now hope to find clues to the playwright's life among the rubbish from a dig.

Cornish find redraws map of Roman Britain

Roman artifacts have been discovered at a fortress in Cornwall formerly believed to be an exclusively Iron Age site. This find revises the historical view of the Roman occupation of Britain, which had been thought not to extend so far southwest.

Carlisle dig provides a "wonderful glimpse into how people lived 2,000 years ago"

Carlisle Castle, one of the most important archaeological digs in northern England, has now been completed, providing experts with a wealth of archaeological evidence to study including armor, leather, pottery, and everyday household items.

New insights into St. Augustine's central plaza

Archaeologists digging at the Plaza de la Constitucion in St. Augustine, Florida, are finding that the plaza is different than the plans authorized by the King of Spain in the late 1500's.

Aztec exhibition opens as archaeologists seek royal tomb

Archaeologists working on an excavation in downtown Mexico City think they are on the brink of discovering the first Aztec royal tomb ever found. Meanwhile, objects from the dig are on display at "Moctezuma II: Times and Destiny of a Ruler" at the Templo Mayor Museum.

Shell analysis confirms early Virginia accounts

An analysis of oyster shells thrown away by colonists in Jamestown, Virginia, indicates that historical accounts of a severe drought in 1611-1612 are correct. The shells show that the James River was much saltier during those years than in the present day, indicating lower rainfall.

Birch bark manuscripts found in Novgarod

A school girl taking part in a dig in Novgorod, Russia has discovered two birch bark manuscripts and a medieval seal.

World's oldest leather shoe found

Archaeologists have found a leather show dating back 5,500 years in a cave in Armenia. The shoe is cut from one piece of cow leather and sewn together with eyelets.

Anglo-Saxon settlement discovered in the Cotswolds

Steve Sheldon, of Cotswold Archaeology, has called the recent discovery of an Anglo-Saxon timber hall in Cheltenham, England "one of the best finds of his career." The settlement is believed to date between the 6th and 8th centuries.

De Soto traces exhibited in Atlanta

At Fernbank Museum of Natural History in Atlanta, visitors can see the results of a new excavation in a remote corner of southeastern Georgia.

Face of a 14th century knight revealed

State-of-the-art technology has been used to reconstruct the face of a medieval knight whose skeleton was discovered beneath Stirling Castle in Scotland. (photo)

Archaeological dig confirms United States' oldest street

For generations, St. Augustine's Aviles Street has competed with Philadelphia's Elfreth's Alley as the oldest street in the United States, but a recent archaeological dig may hand the honor to the Florida city.

Mummy of 16th century woman found in Korea

The mummified remains of a 16th century noble woman were found at a construction site in Osan (Gyeonggi Province), South Korea.

Hoard of Henry I Pennies Discovered in Yorkshire, England

An amateur metal detector group has discovered a hoard of 178 12th century silver pennies in North Yorkshire. [photo]

Millennium Dig report documents 80,000 Carlisle artifacts

The city of Carlisle, England is now being mentioned in the same breath as York and Newcastle when it comes to Roman archaeology thanks to the Millennium dig. The three-year effort has now been documented in a 936-page report.

International Vinland Seminar to take place in Chicago

Officials have announced that the International Vinland-seminar,  "a three day event dedicated to the Norse discovery of America and Scandinavian Viking Culture," will take place in Chicago, IL October 15-17, 2010 at North Park University.

Bogbodies: "true tales from the peat marshes"

In an article for Archaeology (Volume 63 Number 3, May/June 2010) Jarrett A. Lobell and Samir S. Patel take a look at "true tales from the peat marshes of northern Europe" by re-examing remains found in the bogs. (photos)

Former Yugoslavian countries documenting medieval tombstones

The nations of Croatia, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Serbia and Montenegro are working together to document monumental medieval tombstones known as "Stecci".

14th century remains give "fascinating insight" into Fenwick history

The discovery of a grave dating to the 13th or 14th century may provide a link to a medieval settlement that existed at West Fenwick, England.

International Vinland-seminar

We are pleased to announce the International Vinland-seminar in Chicago, a three day event dedicated to the Norse discovery of America and Scandinavian Viking Culture, 15th – 17th October 2010.

Saxon artifact puzzles experts

Microscopes, X-rays and CAT scans have, so far, been used to identify a recent discovery of a Saxon object from an archaeological dig at The Meads in Kent, with no results. The circular silver, bronze and wooden disk is believed to be a mount, but no one is sure. (photos)

Graveyard of ships found in Baltic Sea

Workers constructing a gas pipeline in the Baltic Sea between Russia and Germany have discovered a graveyard of a dozen shipwrecked vessels, some dating to the Middle Ages.

"Dead Cities" offer glimpse into Byzantine life

The "Dead Cities" of northern Syria, actually suburbs of Antioch, were deserted in the 7th-10th centuries after continual natural disasters and warfare. Now the remains of over 100 small towns are giving insight into life in the Byzantine Empire.

Plea made to acquire Staffordshire Hoard

In January 2010, a public appeal was made to raise money to build buy the Staffordshire Hoard, considered the "most important find ever" from the Anglo-Saxon era. The appeal was made to raise UK£3.3m to pay the finder of the Hoard and the owner of the land.

Brain of a medieval child found in France

Scientists have found a 13th century preserved brain, complete with intact neurons and brain cells, inside the skull of an 18-month old child found in northwestern France.

British ponder mystery of Richard II

A visit to Westminster Abbey will show visitors the tomb of King Richard II - or will it? Researchers are wondering if tests on remains found at a former Dominican friary in Stirling, Scotland might determine them to be those of the 14th century king.