Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Mass grave at Bedlam discovered

Archaeologists working at the site of London's latest Crossrail project have discovered a mass grave of hundreds of skeletons. The grave is at the location of St Bethlehem hospital, the first facility for mental patients. (video & photos)

Hjaltland Research Network to be established in the Shetlands

More Norse than Scottish, the Shetlands are poised to become a new mecca for the study of things Viking, where scholars plan to begin a new project entitled Mapping Viking Age Shetland.

Late Roman graves discovered in Canterbury

Archaeologists have discovered a cemetery, dating to the late Roman period, is the St. Dunstan's area of Canterbury, England. They believe, due to the placement of the bodies and lack of grave goods, that the burials were Christian.

Leprosy, battle wounds found in early medieval cemetery

The scull of a leper who died fighting is one of several interesting burials identified at an Italian cemetery used between 500 and 700 CE. The cemetery likely contains remains of Germanic Lombards or Avars.

Medieval settlement discovered in Sudan

A three-year research project, sponsored by the Prehistory Institute of Poznan University and the National Corporation for Antiquities and Museums of Sudan, has begun at the Hosh esh-Sheitan strongold in the Nile Valley. Archeologists have already found one or more medieval settlements.

Vinland the Good

A short documentary, entitled The Vinland Mystery, looks at the search for the "only known Norse settlement in North America - Vinland the Good."

The sturdy skull of Simon of Sudbury

During the Peasants' Revolt in 1381, Simon Theobald, once Lord Chancellor of England and Archbishop of Canterbury, was beheaded outside the Tower of London. Now his mummified skull is being given the scientific treatment.

Anglo-Saxon plough found in England

Parts of a 7th century "heavy plough" have been found in Kent, England. This discovery pushes back the first known instance of heavy plowing in England by several hundred years.

New trends in Icelandic archeology

In a research paper for Scandinavian-Canadian Studies, Vol.16 (2005-6) Erin-Lee Halstad McGuire discusses new methodologies for studying the settlement and development of Iceland.

Sutton Hoo ship burial to be reconstructed

To enhance the visitor experience, the burial chamber at Sutton Hoo is being reconstructed. Richard Daniel, of the BBC, reports. (video)

The Berry site: A Spanish "lost colony"

Did Spanish conquistadors first settle North Carolina? After discoveries in the 1980's along the Catawba River, where archaeologists found a Spanish fort, they just may have. The Berry Site is located near Morganton, North Carolina.

Carved altar stones shed new light on Roman Scotland

Two elaborately carved altar stones have been unearthed in East Lothian, Scotland. The stones are dedicated to the Roman god Mithras and is the northernmost location that evidence of Mithraism has been found.

Evildoers beware! British heritage police are on the job!

Thefts and vandalism of historic British landmarks has led English Heritage to team with police chiefs in Gloucestershire, Wiltshire and Somerset to create a new police force to guard historic sites.

"Jewel in the crown of Libya's Roman legacy" still intact

Archaeologists have feared the worst for Libya's Roman cultural heritage during the recent unrest in the country, but so far, sites such as Leptis Magna the "jewel in the crown" of Libya's Roman legacy, are unharmed.

Medieval Irish fishery victim of budget cuts

Archaeologists from the University College Dublin are unable to resume research on 14th century fishweirs near the Fergus Estuary in County Clare, Ireland which have been threatened by weather. The team blames budget cuts by the Irish Heritage Council. (photo)

Medieval Irish mill site yields surprising finds

Remnants of a medieval mill, including well preserved timber beams, pottery, and shoes, have been found  beneath Meeting House Square in Temple Bar, Dublin. The site was discovered during a routine pre-constuction survey, and they did not expect to find much of interest.

Atlantis found at last?

For the first time in several years, archaeologists believe they have located the lost continent of Atlantis. The latest theory is the subject of a new television film on the National Geographic Channel entitled Finding Atlantis.

Researchers hope to learn more about Roman religion

In 1870, Humphrey Senhouse discovered Roman altars at Maryport near Hadrian's Wall, beginning a long debate over the nature of religion in the Roman military. Now excavations at the Camp Farm site may shed new light on the subject.

Step back in time to Birka

When archaeologists excavated the Viking village of Birka near Stockholm, Sweden, they never imagined that filmmakers Mikael Agaton and Lars Rengfelt would make it possible to walk through the town as it was in the Middle Ages.

"Roman Town" allows children to experience archaeology through a computer game

Suzi Wilczynski knows what it is like to work on a dig in the hot Israeli sun. Now she has used her experience to create an adventure computer game aimed at children which allows them to learn about the Romans and the life of an archaeologist.

Viking artifacts links

Researchers of all things Viking may want to visit the Vikverir website which features a links page of museums throughout Scandinavia which have posted photos of their collections.

Footprint of Roman child found in England

2,000 years ago, a Roman child went skipping through the mud near a Roman fort in Yorkshire, England. In 2010, his or her footprint was found.

African soldier chose retirement in Stratford

Sometime in the 4th century, an Roman soldier of African descent picked Stratford-upon-Avon as a place to retire. The soldier's remains were discovered in 2009.

Free "Archaeology of York" downloads

Several books in the Archaeology of York series are now available to download for free in PDF format. The books are out of print.

New film set to spark interest in Hadrian's Wall

The mystery of Rome's "lost legion" has mystified historians for centuries. Now a new young-adult film, along with a redesigned Roman museum, may revive interest in Hadrian's Wall.

Bog body research needed, says Danish scholar

For centuries, scholars have debated the origins of bodies discovered mummified in murky swamps throughout northern Europe spurring calls for further investigation.

Illinois college students to explore "day-to-day life in the Roman courtyside"

A team of Knox College (Galesburg, Illinois) professors and their students will spend the summer studying Tall Dhiban, an archeological site near the modern town of Dhiban in west-central Jordan.

Byzantine-era burials found in Syria

Archaeologists working at Jabal al-Sin, Syria on the Euphrates River have found cemeteries dating to the era of the Byzantine Empire.

Roman bones found under Jersey church

Contractors working on an extension to a church in Jersey, UK, were surprised to discover human remains during excavation. They were doubly surprised to learn that the remains are from Roman residents of the island.

Celtic treasure unearthed in Germany

Archaeologists have found gold and amber jewelry in a Celtic tomb near Herbertingen, Germany. They believe the tomb belonged to a noble woman from the area. The tomb is part of a region that was an important Celtic trading center in the 7th-4th centuries BCE.