Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Bog begets barrel of butter

Workers extracting turf from a bog in Galway, Ireland have found a wooden keg full of butter. The butter could be as much as 2,500 years old.

Ancient wine found in China

Archaeologists have unearthed a 2,000 year old wine jug in Henan Province, China. The copper pot, sealed by centuries of rust, still has liquid in it.

"Death of a king" brought to life at Sutton Hoo

Visitors to Sutton Hoo, the Anglo-Saxon ship burial site in eastern England, can now experience the royal burial in a new way, complete with "smells and sounds to create an authentic atmosphere." (slideshow)

Time Team finds Anglo-Saxon hall

Channel 4's Time Team recently carried out an archaeological project at Bamburgh Castle in Northumberland, England where it discovered the floor of what they believe is a medieval hall.

All Saints Church might be site of Anglo-Saxon coronations

A team of researchers from London's Kingston University may have located the site of as many as seven 10th century Anglo-Saxon kings including Athelstan and Ethelred the Unready. All Saints Church is located near Westminister Abbey.

Scotland's Viking shipbuilders

Archaeologists are investigating a 12th century Norse shipbuilding site on the Isle of Skye, Scotland.  So far they have found boat timbers, a stone dock, and part of a man-made canal.

Archaeologists excavate murder in Roman England

Archaeologists have excavated the body of a young woman that they believe was killed by a Roman sword. She was found hastily buried in a shallow grave, indicating she may have been murdered.

Medieval industry uncovered in Suffolk, England

A construction site has revlealed evidence of of ovens and leather tanneries dating between the 12th and 16th century. They have found lime barrels as well as enough cattle horns to indicate industrial animal processing.

10th century graves found in Hungary

The Medieval Hungary blog reports that three 10th century graves have been discovered near Pest, Hungary, one of which belonged to a high-ranking male. (photo)

Large Roman "industrial estate" found in Rockingham Forest

A Roman industrial site has been discovered near Peterborough in the Rockingham Forest. The site is believed to be "one of the largest archaeological sites in England."

Roman spearmen found beneath Hyderabad Barracks

The remains of two Roman soldiers, dating to the 4th or 5th century CE, have been discovered beneath the former Hyderabad Barracks in Colchester, England.

Charcoal pits tell story of medieval Norwegian economy

Trondheim, once known as Bymarka, was the center of religious life in medieval Norway. Now the discovery of more than 500 charcoal pits in the area proves that the city was an industrial center as well.

Coppergate woman "brought to life"

For the first time, the public will be able to look at the face of a Viking woman, complete with bonnet, whose skeleton was discovered 30 years ago at Coppergate in York, England. (photo)

Mass grave at Bedlam discovered

Archaeologists working at the site of London's latest Crossrail project have discovered a mass grave of hundreds of skeletons. The grave is at the location of St Bethlehem hospital, the first facility for mental patients. (video & photos)

Hjaltland Research Network to be established in the Shetlands

More Norse than Scottish, the Shetlands are poised to become a new mecca for the study of things Viking, where scholars plan to begin a new project entitled Mapping Viking Age Shetland.

Late Roman graves discovered in Canterbury

Archaeologists have discovered a cemetery, dating to the late Roman period, is the St. Dunstan's area of Canterbury, England. They believe, due to the placement of the bodies and lack of grave goods, that the burials were Christian.

Leprosy, battle wounds found in early medieval cemetery

The scull of a leper who died fighting is one of several interesting burials identified at an Italian cemetery used between 500 and 700 CE. The cemetery likely contains remains of Germanic Lombards or Avars.

Medieval settlement discovered in Sudan

A three-year research project, sponsored by the Prehistory Institute of Poznan University and the National Corporation for Antiquities and Museums of Sudan, has begun at the Hosh esh-Sheitan strongold in the Nile Valley. Archeologists have already found one or more medieval settlements.

Vinland the Good

A short documentary, entitled The Vinland Mystery, looks at the search for the "only known Norse settlement in North America - Vinland the Good."

The sturdy skull of Simon of Sudbury

During the Peasants' Revolt in 1381, Simon Theobald, once Lord Chancellor of England and Archbishop of Canterbury, was beheaded outside the Tower of London. Now his mummified skull is being given the scientific treatment.

Anglo-Saxon plough found in England

Parts of a 7th century "heavy plough" have been found in Kent, England. This discovery pushes back the first known instance of heavy plowing in England by several hundred years.

New trends in Icelandic archeology

In a research paper for Scandinavian-Canadian Studies, Vol.16 (2005-6) Erin-Lee Halstad McGuire discusses new methodologies for studying the settlement and development of Iceland.

Sutton Hoo ship burial to be reconstructed

To enhance the visitor experience, the burial chamber at Sutton Hoo is being reconstructed. Richard Daniel, of the BBC, reports. (video)

The Berry site: A Spanish "lost colony"

Did Spanish conquistadors first settle North Carolina? After discoveries in the 1980's along the Catawba River, where archaeologists found a Spanish fort, they just may have. The Berry Site is located near Morganton, North Carolina.

Carved altar stones shed new light on Roman Scotland

Two elaborately carved altar stones have been unearthed in East Lothian, Scotland. The stones are dedicated to the Roman god Mithras and is the northernmost location that evidence of Mithraism has been found.

Evildoers beware! British heritage police are on the job!

Thefts and vandalism of historic British landmarks has led English Heritage to team with police chiefs in Gloucestershire, Wiltshire and Somerset to create a new police force to guard historic sites.

"Jewel in the crown of Libya's Roman legacy" still intact

Archaeologists have feared the worst for Libya's Roman cultural heritage during the recent unrest in the country, but so far, sites such as Leptis Magna the "jewel in the crown" of Libya's Roman legacy, are unharmed.

Medieval Irish fishery victim of budget cuts

Archaeologists from the University College Dublin are unable to resume research on 14th century fishweirs near the Fergus Estuary in County Clare, Ireland which have been threatened by weather. The team blames budget cuts by the Irish Heritage Council. (photo)

Medieval Irish mill site yields surprising finds

Remnants of a medieval mill, including well preserved timber beams, pottery, and shoes, have been found  beneath Meeting House Square in Temple Bar, Dublin. The site was discovered during a routine pre-constuction survey, and they did not expect to find much of interest.

Atlantis found at last?

For the first time in several years, archaeologists believe they have located the lost continent of Atlantis. The latest theory is the subject of a new television film on the National Geographic Channel entitled Finding Atlantis.