Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Illinois college students to explore "day-to-day life in the Roman courtyside"

A team of Knox College (Galesburg, Illinois) professors and their students will spend the summer studying Tall Dhiban, an archeological site near the modern town of Dhiban in west-central Jordan.

Byzantine-era burials found in Syria

Archaeologists working at Jabal al-Sin, Syria on the Euphrates River have found cemeteries dating to the era of the Byzantine Empire.

Roman bones found under Jersey church

Contractors working on an extension to a church in Jersey, UK, were surprised to discover human remains during excavation. They were doubly surprised to learn that the remains are from Roman residents of the island.

Celtic treasure unearthed in Germany

Archaeologists have found gold and amber jewelry in a Celtic tomb near Herbertingen, Germany. They believe the tomb belonged to a noble woman from the area. The tomb is part of a region that was an important Celtic trading center in the 7th-4th centuries BCE.

Battle of Towton study shows gruesome side of medieval combat

During England's War of the Roses, the Battle of Towton was a turning point in long-going warfare between the Houses of Lancaster and York. Now new forensic studies are helping researchers to understand the concept of medieval warfare in a new way.

Sherwood "thing" to be investigated

Five years ago, local archaeologists discovered a thing, an open-air Viking meeting place, on Hanger Hill in Sherwood Forest, England. Now the experts are moving in for an official survey.

Northumberland coal mine hides Anglo Saxon village

"The surface mine at Shotton has given us the first direct evidence of Anglo-Saxon settlement in this part of the county and has confirmed its potential for making important archaeological discoveries," said Karen Derham, Northumberland County Council Assistant County Archaeologist about the recent discovery of an Anglo-Saxon settlement.

Roman farm found in Suffolk

Archaeologists working on the site of a new school in Lowestoft, England, believe they have discovered the remains of a 1st century Roman farm where a family of 12 might have lived.

Crusader "rest stop" found in Bulgaria

In the 12th century, crusaders were known to have stopped at the Byzantine city of Blismos along the old Roman road in modern Bulgaria. Now archaeologists believe they have found the city near the village of Zlatna Livada.

Website covers opening of tomb of Tycho Brahe

Aarhus University has created an extensive website covering the 2010 opening of the tomb of 16th century Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe. The site includes photos and video about the project.

Chinese settlement may show evidence of lost Roman army.

In the 1990's, archaeologists were surprised to discover evidence of early western settlers in a remote town in China's Yongchang County on the edge of the Gobi desert, including a Roman style fort and nearby residents with blonde hair and green eyes.

Papers and artifacts of Richard II found by National Portrait Gallery archivist

Krzysztof Adamiec, the assistant archivist at the National Portrait Gallery, was given the assignment of cataloguing the papers of the Gallery’s first Director Sir George Scharf when he discovered something amazing: fragments and artifacts from the tomb of King Richard II.

Pipes with personalized decoration found at Jamestown colony

400-year old smoking pipes bearing the names of their intended owners have been unearthed in Jamestown, Virginia (USA).

Ancient Londinium revealed in London park

The remains of the "busy metropolis of Londinium" may lie beneath half a meter of the Duke of Northumberland's Syon Park, the proposed site of a lixury hotel. The Roman landscape was discovered by archaeologists before hotel construction began.

Stirling Castle knight identified

The skeletal remains of a knight found at Stirling Castle in Scotland have been identified as those of English nobleman Sir John de Stricheley, who died in 1341. De Stricheley was probably killed by a Scottish arrow.

Headless gladiator mystery continues

Archaeologists are still debating the meaning of the burial of 46 decapitated men in a Roman cemetery in northern England. The remains, most of which originiated from far-flung localities, were buried with honor in a prestigious cemetery.

Newly discovered photographs shed light on Sutton Hoo excavation

A box of 400 photographs of the 1939 Sutton Hoo excavation has recently been found, hiding in storage at the Sutton Hoo Visitors Centre. The photographs were taken by two school teachers who seemed to have unlimited access to the site.

The massacre of St Brice’s Day

Experts believe they have solved the puzzle of the mass Viking grave discovered in 2008 beneath St John’s College, St Giles, England: Ethnic cleansing.

"Impressive" Roman finds hold up clinic construction in Scotland

Residents of Musselburgh, Scotland may have to wait a little longer for their health care while city officials and archaeologists decide how to proceed with the excavation of "human remains, the bones of horses and weapons and culinary tools" dating to the Roman era.

Mona Lisa now buried in garbage dump

Thirty years ago, the city of Florence, Italy converted the Sant'Orsola convent, the final resting place of Lisa Gherardini, the model of da Vinci's Mona Lisa, into barracks for the city's Guardia di Finanza. The graves and tombs from the site were dumped into 'Case le Passarini', the rubbish tip near Florence.

Russia hopes to attract tourists to medieval city

Centuries before St. Petersburg, Velikiy Novgorod was a European-wide trading center and Russia's gateway to the West. Now Russian officials are hoping to attract history-loving tourists to the country's oldest Slavic city.

"Caucasian Stonehenge" found in Russia

Russian archaeologist Andrey Belinskiy believes he has discovered a "Caucasian Stonehenge" built by a Bronze Age civilization around 1600 BCE. The well-preserved ruins are located in the North Caucasus mountains.

Medieval graves found in Siberia

Siberian archeologists are working to excavate a medieval cemetery, dating to the 11th century, near the River Angara in Krasnoyarsk, Siberia. Over 10,000 items such as jewelry, pottery and tools have been found.

Welsh students hope to find medieval Whitelands

Teacher Karl James Langford and his students are on a quest: to find the lost medieval village of Whitelands near Porthkerry in Wales.

Reading grave may hold medieval nun

Archaeologists working on a site next to Reading Minster in England have uncovered what they believe is the grave of a medieval nun, possibly dating to Saxon times.

Early medieval hospital found

Archaeologists working at the site of a former Leper Hospital at St Mary Magdalen in Winchester, England believe the hospital may date to the 11th century, making it the earliest known hospital in Britain.

Siberian mystery

On an island in the middle of a remote lake in Siberia, not far from the Mongolian border, lies the fortress of Por-Bajin. Por-Bajin is an archaeological site that dates to the 8th or 9th century. Its walls enclose 7 acres (2.8 hectares), a maze of about 30 buildings.

Dig hopes to uncover bones of 14th century Scottish bishop

A team of archaeologists is hoping to find the remains of Bernard of Kilwinning, the 14th century Scottish bishop who drafted the Declaration of Arbroath. The team is excavating a medieval monastery in the Ayrshire town of Kilwinning.

Mary Rose artifacts on display for the first time

In late 2009, previously unseen artifacts found on the Mary Rose, Henry VIII's flagship, were put on display at the Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. The artifacts will be included in the exhibits at the new Mary Rose Museum scheduled to open in 2012. (photos)

Artifacts tell story of early colonial life

The website Virtual Jamestown includes a gallery of photos of artifacts found at the Jamestown site. The gallery includes large images and rotating clips of each of the artifacts in the collection.