Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Arthur's roundtable at King's Knot, Scotland?

Archaeologists at King's Knot in Stirling, Scotland have discovered a "circular feature" that some believe might be the fabled round table of King Arthur.

Roman port discovery "exceeds all expectations"

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of a Roman port near Newport, Wales, only the second of such ports known from Roman Britain. Excavation has revealed the main quay wall, as well as the landing stages and wharves.

Legend leads archaeologist to Roman discovery

As a little girl, Rose Ferraby listened to stories about a Roman amphitheatre near the village of Aldborough in northern England. Now her attention to his tale has paid off with the discovery of England's "lost" Roman cultural center.

Forum focus of new dig at Caistor St Edmund

Dr. Will Bowden, associate professor of Roman archaeology at the University of Nottingham, has begun a new dig at he site of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund, this time in search of a Roman forum and an Anglo-Saxon town.

Roman jar stumps experts

Canadian experts are stumped after reconstructing a 3rd century Roman jar "riddled with tiny holes." The jar is part of the collection of the Museum of Ontario Archaeology. (photo)

Devon discovery could "rewrite the history of the Romans in Britain"

The discovery of the largest Roman settlement ever found in Devon, England began when two metal detectorists found nearly a hundred Roman coins near Exeter. The find resulted in a geophysical survey which uncovered the large settlement.

"Sophisticated" Roman village found at Northamptonshire construction site

Excavations of a construction site in Burton Latimer, in Northamptonshire, England, have unearthed nearly 40kg of Roman pottery, ironwork, and the remains of 30 Romans, leading experts to believe that the site was once a wealthy Roman village.

Discoveries at Ribãt da Arrifana offer insight into 12th century Islam

For ten years, archaeologists have been excavating the Islamic convent/fortress near Aljezur, Portugal. recent discoveries include "a mosque, 21 burials and a funerary head stone with an Arabic inscription," all of which have added to the impressive site.

Roman child's grave found in Dorchester

Wessex Archaeology has been called in to oversee archaeological activities at the Charles Street development in Dorchester, England after the discovery of a child's grave dating to Roman times.

Discovery of coins pushes boundary of Roman England westward

A cache of Roman coins found by metal detectorists has lead to the discovery of a large Roman settlement near Devon, England. This pushes the known boundaries of the Roman empire in England further west.

Viking women on the move

The discovery of the graves of Norse women in eastern England has now led scholars to believe that Viking women emigrated earlier than once believed. Research on 14 Norse graves showed that six of the graves contained the remains of women, some armed with sword and shield.

"Mysterious" medieval sites included in AOL list

AOL has published a slideshow of "11 Bizarre and Mysterious Historical Sites," including several from the Middle Ages. (photos)

"Unexpected but important " Roman find in Bedford, England

Workers at a construction site in Bedford, England recently discovered a section of wall dating to Roman times. Further discoveries included roofing tiles, floor tiles and pottery, leading experts to believe the artifacts belonged to a Roman villa.

Saint Philip's tomb discovered in Turkey

Archaeologists working in Pamukkale, Turkey believe they have found the tomb of St. Philip the Apostle. Pamukkale is the modern name of the ancient city of Hierapolis where Philip was killed.

Pict Persona

Looking for any information on the Picts (who lived in northern Pre-Scottland) aside from Wikipedia. Theories on language are very welcome. :) Thank you.

The mystery of the medieval tunnels

Hundreds of narrow tunnels called "Erdstalls" can be found throughout the Bavarian region of Germany and Austria. While most experts agree that they are medieval, no one knows why they were built or how they were used. This has led to the Erstalls being called "Central Europe's last great mystery."

"Magnificent" finds at Perperikon

Bulgaria's top archeologist, Prof. Nikolay Ovcharov, has been happy to announce the discovery of incredible finds at the Thracian rock sanctuary Perperikon in southern Bulgaria, including a "magnificent bronze cross from the 10th – 11th century."

Medieval chess piece found in Iceland

A 12th or 13th century chess piece has been found in Iceland. The piece is carved from herringbone and looks  similar to the Lewis Chessmen.

Anglo-Saxon sapphire ring found in England

A gold and sapphire ring found in Yorkshire, England, likely belonged to royalty or to someone else of very high rank. The ring would have belonged to an Anglo-Saxon or a Viking. The ring is very high quality, even compared to other treasure of its time.

Remains of Irish beauty discovered at Dungannon

Archaeologists working on a dig at Dungannon, Ireland's Castle Hill have discovered what experts believe are the remains of Mabel Bagenal, third wife of the Earl of Tyrone, Hugh O'Neill, and known as Ireland's "Helen of Troy."

Pottery sheds light on medieval Welsh manor

The discovery of elaborate, locally made pottery is giving insight into a southern Welsh manor and the medieval village surrounding it.

Medieval ship found in Swedish waters

The intact shipwreck of a cog, a ship used in the Baltic between the 12th and 14th centuries, has been discovered off the island of Gotland. The ship was discovered during a sonar survey and may be one of the oldest intact wrecks ever found.

16th century Chinese bronze found in shipwreck off Mexico

A 16th century Chinese bronze in the form of a Foo Dog has been found off the Pacific coast of Baja, Mexico. The artifact is believed to come from the cargo of the galleon San Felipe which disappeared in 1576.

Plans announced for visitor center at Camp Farm

Camp Farm in Maryport, Cumbria, England hopes to be the site of a world-class tourist attraction showcasing "the area’s strong Roman heritage and recent archeological finds." Hadrian’s Wall Heritage Ltd has applied for UK£10.7m to build the center.

Lead coffins found in Roman city

Two sarcophagii made of lead have been found at the site of the ancient city of Gabii in Italy. The caskets date to the 1st or 2nd century CE.

Badge of St. Ursula found in England

A metal dectorist in Lancashire, England has unearthed a 500-year old pilgrim badge of St. Ursula. The badge came from her shrine in Cologne, Germany and is unique in Britain.

Archaeology project explores evolution of Jamestown fort

No one expected archaeologist William Kelso to find the "lost" English fort built at Jamestown, Virginia in 1607, but he did. Now the 70-year-old expert hopes to follow the evolution of the fort with the help of university students. (video)

Cotswold dig reveals life in the 13th and 14th centuries

An archaeological team from Cotswold Archaeology is leading a dig at Cowl Lane in Winchcombe, England, revealing "more than 40 rubbish pits containing medieval pottery, animal bone and metalworking evidence."

A Roman "what's-it?"

We know it's Roman, but what the heck is it? That's the question being asked by archaeologists about a Roman dodecahedron dating from the 2nd-3rd century and found throughout Roman Europe. (photo)

Edward Jenner's garden holds historic secrets

Archaeologists from the University of Bristol are digging up Edward Jenner's garden, not seeking evidence of the 18th century British scientist, but secrets much older, including a skeleton dating to Roman times.