Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Pictish power centered in Rhynie

Excavations near the site of Scotland's Rhynie Man, a six-foot boulder carved with the image of a Pict, have revealed a fortified early medieval settlement, possibly the seat of the mysterious Kings of Pictland.

Anglo-Saxon burials reveal life of hardship

A 7th-8th century CE cemetery has been discovered during a patio renovation at a home in Warwickhire, England. The burials, probably part of a much larger cemetery, have revealed new insight about life for people in the Middle Saxon period.

Pierced skull leads to 1,000 year old murder mystery

As the saying goes, "Bows don't kill people, arrows do." Such seems to be the case for a burial in Galway, Ireland. Evidence of a shallow grave and an arrow found in the victim's skull has led researches to conclude that the man may have been murdered.

Acre: “one of the most exciting sites in the world of archaeology”

Archaeologists and tourists alike are rediscovering Acre, the Crusader city in Israel. Now the ancient city is being viewed as a goldmine for medieval artifacts. Eliezer Stern, the Israeli archaeologist in charge of Acre, calls the city “one of the most exciting sites in the world of archaeology.” (photos)

Five-year York Hungate dig comes to an end in December, 2011

Archaeologists are beginning to pack up their tools five years after the excavation of York, England's Hungate dig began. In 2012, the York Archaeological Trust will turn the 2,500 sq m (26,900 sq ft) excavation over to developers for a modern housing project.

"Mysterious" Silk Road city found

Chinese archaeologists believe they have discovered evidence of an important Silk Road city which disappeared in the 3rd century CE.

Crusader inscription found in Arabic

A 13th century inscription written in Arabic has been translated and found to be a proclamation by Holy Roman Emperor Frederick II. The inscription is thought to originally be from a wall in Jaffa, Israel. The inscription is the only known example of its kind.

Spirits banned at Nevern Castle

Archaeologists excavating at Nevern Castle in Pembrokeshire, Wales have uncovered several slates dating to the 12th century scratched with images of stars and other symbols designed to ward off evil spirits. The slates were found in the castle's entranceway.

Remains of fifteen Anglo-Saxons given Christian burial

Last year, fifteen skeletons dating to Angelo Saxon times were discovered during a construction project at the Church of the Immaculate Conception in Bicester, England. Recently the remains were re-interred in a church memorial garden. (video)

16th century Spanish artifacts found in Georgia

Jewelry and other artifacts from the 1500s have been found in an excavation of a Native American village in Georgia (USA). The artifacts suggest that conquistador Hernando de Soto may have travelled far off course in his exploration of Florida and points west.

Scottish archaeologists investigate vitrified fort

1,300 years ago, a tribe of warriors tried in vain to defend a fort below Abbey Craig in Stirling, Scotland. Their failure led to the total destruction, or vitrification, of the fort by fire. Recently archaeologists spent four days investigating the site.

14th century Ottoman conqueror found at Perperikon

Discoveries continue to be unearthed at the Perperikon archaeological site in Bulgaria. The latest is the tomb of a 14th century Ottoman conqueror.

Viking boat burial found in Scotland

An intact Viking boat burial has been found in the highlands of Scotland, the first burial of its kind found on the UK mainland. The artifacts found at the site indicate the man buried there may have been a high ranking warrior.

Churches in Sudan shed light on saints and pilgrims

A series of well-preserved medieval churches in central Sudan are giving researchers new information into the world of medieval pilgrimages and veneration. Inscriptions at one site show that pilgrims came from as far away as Catalonia.

13th century graveyard in Italy reveals strange burials

A woman with nails driven into her skull and another surrounded by 17 dice have led archaeologists to speculate that a cemetery in Tuscany may have been a witch's graveyard.

Early Christian cemetery found in Ireland

A pre-Viking burial site dating to the 600s has been found near Dublin, Ireland. The site was discovered during construction for a power company project.

Archaeology meets folklore in documentary

Filmmakers Davide Marco Zori and Jesse Byock from the UCLA Archaeology Department explore "whether oral and written histories can help us understand the relics of the past" in The Saga of a Viking Age Longhouse in Iceland.

7th century burial site found in Fingal County, Ireland

Workers laying pipe for EirGrid were startled to discover human remains while excavating for underground power lines north of Dublin, Ireland. Tests revealed that the skeletons in the burial ground dated from between 617 to 675 CE.

The search for the Stirling Roman road

The site of the new visitor center at Bannockburn, Scotland may hold more history than just the battlefield. Archaeologists are looking for evidence of a Roman road which is believed to have run through the site.

Important Viking site in Ireland confirmed

Archaeologists working on the excavation of a Viking village in Louth County, Ireland are calling it "one of the most important Viking sites in the world." The site is believed to be where the Vikings brought their long ships for wintering and repair.

Chinese archaeological excavation gives insight into Liao dynasty

For the first time, Chinese archaeologists are getting the opportunity to mount a large-scale investigation of the Upper Capital of the Liao dynasty. The first structure excavated was the Qiande Gate of the royal city.

Saxon cemetery may mark town of Hamwick

Excavations at a housing project in Southampton, England have uncovered what experts believe is the earliest cemetery for the Saxon town of Hamwick. Nine skeletons were discovered which are believed to date from the 7th through 9th centuries.

Viking boat burial found in Scotland

An intact Viking boat burial has been found in the highlands of Scotland, the first burial of its kind found on the UK mainland. The artifacts found at the site indicate the man buried there may have been a high-ranking warrior.

Face of beheaded Archbishop of Canterbury revealed

Experts have reconstructed the face of Simon of Sudbury, the Archbishop of Canterbury who was beheaded in a peasant revolt in 1381.

Inscribed 12th century slate may have been used to ward off evil

Archaeologists have discovered a rare incised slate while digging at Nevern Castle in England. The slate dates to between 1170 and 1190.

Reliquary holding relics of saint found in Perperikon

Archaeologist Nikolay Ovcharov recently discovered a 5th century bronze reliquary containg a cross which held two fibers, either hair or textile, believed to have belonged to a saint.

Arthur's roundtable at King's Knot, Scotland?

Archaeologists at King's Knot in Stirling, Scotland have discovered a "circular feature" that some believe might be the fabled round table of King Arthur.

Roman port discovery "exceeds all expectations"

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of a Roman port near Newport, Wales, only the second of such ports known from Roman Britain. Excavation has revealed the main quay wall, as well as the landing stages and wharves.

Legend leads archaeologist to Roman discovery

As a little girl, Rose Ferraby listened to stories about a Roman amphitheatre near the village of Aldborough in northern England. Now her attention to his tale has paid off with the discovery of England's "lost" Roman cultural center.

Forum focus of new dig at Caistor St Edmund

Dr. Will Bowden, associate professor of Roman archaeology at the University of Nottingham, has begun a new dig at he site of Venta Icenorum at Caistor St Edmund, this time in search of a Roman forum and an Anglo-Saxon town.