Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Pict Persona

Looking for any information on the Picts (who lived in northern Pre-Scottland) aside from Wikipedia. Theories on language are very welcome. :) Thank you.

The mystery of the medieval tunnels

Hundreds of narrow tunnels called "Erdstalls" can be found throughout the Bavarian region of Germany and Austria. While most experts agree that they are medieval, no one knows why they were built or how they were used. This has led to the Erstalls being called "Central Europe's last great mystery."

"Magnificent" finds at Perperikon

Bulgaria's top archeologist, Prof. Nikolay Ovcharov, has been happy to announce the discovery of incredible finds at the Thracian rock sanctuary Perperikon in southern Bulgaria, including a "magnificent bronze cross from the 10th – 11th century."

Medieval chess piece found in Iceland

A 12th or 13th century chess piece has been found in Iceland. The piece is carved from herringbone and looks  similar to the Lewis Chessmen.

Anglo-Saxon sapphire ring found in England

A gold and sapphire ring found in Yorkshire, England, likely belonged to royalty or to someone else of very high rank. The ring would have belonged to an Anglo-Saxon or a Viking. The ring is very high quality, even compared to other treasure of its time.

Remains of Irish beauty discovered at Dungannon

Archaeologists working on a dig at Dungannon, Ireland's Castle Hill have discovered what experts believe are the remains of Mabel Bagenal, third wife of the Earl of Tyrone, Hugh O'Neill, and known as Ireland's "Helen of Troy."

Pottery sheds light on medieval Welsh manor

The discovery of elaborate, locally made pottery is giving insight into a southern Welsh manor and the medieval village surrounding it.

Medieval ship found in Swedish waters

The intact shipwreck of a cog, a ship used in the Baltic between the 12th and 14th centuries, has been discovered off the island of Gotland. The ship was discovered during a sonar survey and may be one of the oldest intact wrecks ever found.

16th century Chinese bronze found in shipwreck off Mexico

A 16th century Chinese bronze in the form of a Foo Dog has been found off the Pacific coast of Baja, Mexico. The artifact is believed to come from the cargo of the galleon San Felipe which disappeared in 1576.

Plans announced for visitor center at Camp Farm

Camp Farm in Maryport, Cumbria, England hopes to be the site of a world-class tourist attraction showcasing "the area’s strong Roman heritage and recent archeological finds." Hadrian’s Wall Heritage Ltd has applied for UK£10.7m to build the center.

Lead coffins found in Roman city

Two sarcophagii made of lead have been found at the site of the ancient city of Gabii in Italy. The caskets date to the 1st or 2nd century CE.

Badge of St. Ursula found in England

A metal dectorist in Lancashire, England has unearthed a 500-year old pilgrim badge of St. Ursula. The badge came from her shrine in Cologne, Germany and is unique in Britain.

Archaeology project explores evolution of Jamestown fort

No one expected archaeologist William Kelso to find the "lost" English fort built at Jamestown, Virginia in 1607, but he did. Now the 70-year-old expert hopes to follow the evolution of the fort with the help of university students. (video)

Cotswold dig reveals life in the 13th and 14th centuries

An archaeological team from Cotswold Archaeology is leading a dig at Cowl Lane in Winchcombe, England, revealing "more than 40 rubbish pits containing medieval pottery, animal bone and metalworking evidence."

A Roman "what's-it?"

We know it's Roman, but what the heck is it? That's the question being asked by archaeologists about a Roman dodecahedron dating from the 2nd-3rd century and found throughout Roman Europe. (photo)

Edward Jenner's garden holds historic secrets

Archaeologists from the University of Bristol are digging up Edward Jenner's garden, not seeking evidence of the 18th century British scientist, but secrets much older, including a skeleton dating to Roman times.

Staffordshire Hoard environmental archaeology paper available online

The Portable Antiquities Scheme blog has posted a new paper on "the potential of environmental archaeology" in regard to the Staffordshire Hoard discovered in 2009 near Staffordshire England.

Spanish documents describe Irish settlement in South Carolina

Early 16th century Spanish explorers in North America reported the existance of a settlement in modern-day South Carolina of people with "red to brown hair, tan skin and gray eyes." The settlement was called Duhare.

Violent trauma marks Stirling skeletons

The area near Stirling Castle in Scotland was a dangerous place in the 13th - 15th centuries. Evidence of this can be seen in the recent discovery of five skeletons buried at the castle which exhibit signs of having suffered "brutally violent" deaths.

Medieval coffin still Bosworth mystery

For years, a medieval coffin served as a water-garden flower bed in the village of Earl Shilton, England. Now, the sarcophagus occupies pride of place as an exhibit in the courtyard of the Bosworth Battle­field Visitors Centre. Did it belong to Richard III?

Lost medieval village of Norton excavation yields treasures

Archaeologists from Oxford Archaeology North who are excavating Lodge Farm near Runcorn, England, believe they have found the medieval village of Norton.

Medieval artifacts resource page

Professional archaeologists and college professors Michael and Neathery Fuller have created a website, The Virtual Museum of Medieval Archaeology, to post their collection of photographs of medieval artifacts from many museums, sites and time periods.

Mysteries of the Silk Road revealed at Penn Museum

Colin Renfrew, Senior Fellow of the McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research at the University of Cambridge, offers a lecture on the Unsolved Mysteries of the Silk Road. The video is available on YouTube.

"DaVinci Cannon" found in Croatia

Known for his artwork and whimsical flying machines, Leonardo DiVinci's military designs were in high demand in his lifetime. Now, archaeologists believe a 15th century triple-barreled cannon may be the first physical evidence of DaVinci's concept design for an early machine gun.

Scotland's King’s Knot to reveal its secrets

In the 14th century, poet John Barbour placed the site of King Arthur's "tabilll round" south of Stirling Castle in Scotland, a site believed to be King's Knot, a unique “cup and saucer” shaped mound. A new survey may reveal its mysterious secrets.

Free book downloads from York Archaeological Trust

The York Archaeological Trust is offering a number of out-of-print books for free download.

Archaeologists hope to find Shakespeare's final home

Excavations are under way at New Place, in Stratford-upon-Avon, the site of William Shakespeare's last home. The site, which has not been excavated to the level of Tudor times, has already yielded some artifacts of the period.

Bog begets barrel of butter

Workers extracting turf from a bog in Galway, Ireland have found a wooden keg full of butter. The butter could be as much as 2,500 years old.

Ancient wine found in China

Archaeologists have unearthed a 2,000 year old wine jug in Henan Province, China. The copper pot, sealed by centuries of rust, still has liquid in it.

"Death of a king" brought to life at Sutton Hoo

Visitors to Sutton Hoo, the Anglo-Saxon ship burial site in eastern England, can now experience the royal burial in a new way, complete with "smells and sounds to create an authentic atmosphere." (slideshow)