Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Byzantine settlement found in central Greece

Construction workers excavating for a new home uncovered the remains of a Byzantine settlement recently in Lefokastron in central Greece. Experts believe the 11 sites date between the 4th and 11th centuries.

Irish shipwreck the site of mystery and coconuts

A shipwreck found off the coast of Ireland carried an exotic cargo of Iberian pottery and coconuts. The coconuts, which likely sank in the late 16th or early 17th century, would mark the earliest known arrival of this fruit in Ireland.

New terracotta warriors found in China

Over 100 new terracotta warriors have been found in China, some with bright paint on them. Terracotta horses along with real weapons and parts of a chariot have also been found.

16th century "vampire" burial stirs controversy

The burial of a Venician woman with a brick in her mouth was originally publicized as a suspected vampire. Other researchers dispute this.

Elizabethan shipwreck is sunk again

Adding insult to injury, a ship that sank in the Thames in 1574 is now being resunk in a lake in Leicestershire, England. The wreck will be used as an aquatic classroom to train underwater archaeologists.

Evidence of early Jewish presence on Iberian Peninsula

Archaeologists have found the earliest evidence yet of Jews on the Iberian Penninsula. An excavation of a Roman villa in Portugal has revealed a marble slab, probably from a tombstone, with a Hebrew inscription dating to 390 CE.

What lies beneath Fort Pocahontas?

Beneath the earthwork of Fort Pocahontas in Virginia lies a treasure: Fort James, the first permanent English settlement in the New World. Now archaeologists must make a painful decision: preserve a Civil War fort or discover the secrets of the 1607 settlement.

Pathologist finds answers to medieval mysteries

French pathologist Philippe Charlier has used high-tech imagery and DNA analysis to answer questions about Joan of Arc, Napoleon, and a mistress of King Henri II of France. He is now turning his attention to Richard the Lionheart.

Cirencester's Roman amphitheatre to be revamped

The Cirencester town council has plans for their city's Roman ruins, including "the remains of one of the largest Roman amphitheatres in Britain."

Archaeologists hope to find Roman suburb in Northampton

Archaeologists in Northampton, England are set to excavate a site that may reveal 1,000 years of local history, from the Iron Age through the end of the Roman period. They believe the site might have been a suburb of the Roman city of Duston.

New finds shed light on Berlin's twin city Cölln

Little is known about the city of Cölln, across the Spree River from Berlin, Germany, but that may change with the discovery of medieval buildings and nearly 4,000 skeletons. Cölln, the older of the two cities, declined and was incorporated into Berlin.

Ecuadoran archaeologists hope to find Atahualpa's grave

Archaeologists from Ecuador's Cultural Patrimony Institute hope to discover the tomb of Atahualpa, the last Inca emperor, during a dig to be conducted at Sigchos, about 70km south of Quito. The site was found in 2010 by Ecuadoran historian Tamara Estupinan.

Map corrections may help solve mystery of missing colonists

Theories about the fate of the "Lost Colony", a group of English colonists who founded a settlement in coastal North Carolina (USA), have ranged from disease to alien abduction. New evidence found on an English map may finally answer the question.

UK£49,200 Heritage Lottery Fund grant may bring fame to Epiacum

Many travelers to England are familiar with the country's famous Roman forts, but Elaine Edgar is hoping that a UK£49,200 Heritage Lottery Fund grant will help bring fame and visitors to a lesser-known site, Epiacum.

Saxon glass industry at Glastonbury Abbey

A researcher examining excavation reports from Glastonbury Abbey has found that the glass fragments and glassmaking remains found there date to the 680's, much earlier than previously thought.

Folding chair has ancient roots

Future filmmakers of movies about barbarians may have to trade their traditional rock-and-fur decor for a Coleman camping stool.

Oldest German runes found on comb

A second century comb, discovered several years ago in central Germany, may lead to the understanding of early Germanic languages. The carved antler comb bears the oldest engraved runes known in the area. (photo)

St. Johns skeletons prove to be Vikings

In 2008, 37 skeletons were discovered buried at St John's College in Oxford, England. Once believed to have been victoms of the 1002 St Brice's Day Massacre, the remains are now believed to be Viking raiders.

Skeletons halt resurfacing of Scottish road

Authorities have halted resurfacing work around Greyfriars Garden in St. Andrews, Scotland after the discovery of skeletons believed to be Franciscan monks from the 15th century.

In Northumberland, moles assist in archaeology

In Northumberland, England, volunteers are sifting through mole hills looking for artifacts from Epiacum, a Roman fort 12 miles south of Hadrian's wall.

And the horse he rode in on...

Mildenhall Museum in Suffolk, England is expanding to accommodate a new exhibit, the remains of an Anglo-Saxon warrior and the horse he rode in on - or at least with which he was buried - complete with bridle, sword and shield. (photo)

Artifacts found at site of Roman fort in Scotland

A team of archaeologists, supervising the installation of a water main through the site of a Roman fort near Kirkton, Scotland, has discovered a cobbled roads and artifacts dating to Roman times.

Camels in Belgium?

Belgian archeologists Fabienne Pigière and Denis Henrotay have found evidence of camels in Belgium, specifically, camels used by the Romans near military and civilian towns. Their report can be found in an upcoming article for the Journal of Archaeological Science.

Solving the mystery of Roman Wales

Visitors to Caerleon, near Newport in south Wales have long admired the huge 1st century Roman amphitheater, the site of gladiatorial combat, but new discoveries point to the area as an important Roman outpost in Britain. (video)

Gotland bucket reveals silver and bronze

A bronze bucket filled to the brim with silver coins was found in a field on the island of Gotland, Sweden. The coins date to the Viking era.

Uncle Samulus wants YOU!

1,800 years ago, a mixed martial arts champion retired from the ring and decided to give back to his country, successfully using his celebrity to recruit for the army.

History of the Helmet

While the word helmet dates to the 15th century, military headgear has been around for much longer. This article traces the history of the helmet from ancient warfare to modern sports.

Roman kiln found in North Yorkshire

Plans for the new kitchen and classrom space are on hold at Norton primary school in North Yorkshire, England due to the discovery of a Roman kiln, complete with pottery fragments.

Sports scientists to look for archers aboard the Mary Rose

Sports physiologists are examining the skeletons found on the Mary Rose, an English ship that sank in 1545. They are looking for stress injuries and other markers that would indicate which skeletons were professional archers.

Medieval healing spring to be excavated

St. Ann's Well, a medieval healing spring in Nottingham, England, has been scheduled to be excavated sometime in 2012. The site, under a demolished pub, was once believed to have magical healing powers.