Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Skeletons halt resurfacing of Scottish road

Authorities have halted resurfacing work around Greyfriars Garden in St. Andrews, Scotland after the discovery of skeletons believed to be Franciscan monks from the 15th century.

In Northumberland, moles assist in archaeology

In Northumberland, England, volunteers are sifting through mole hills looking for artifacts from Epiacum, a Roman fort 12 miles south of Hadrian's wall.

And the horse he rode in on...

Mildenhall Museum in Suffolk, England is expanding to accommodate a new exhibit, the remains of an Anglo-Saxon warrior and the horse he rode in on - or at least with which he was buried - complete with bridle, sword and shield. (photo)

Artifacts found at site of Roman fort in Scotland

A team of archaeologists, supervising the installation of a water main through the site of a Roman fort near Kirkton, Scotland, has discovered a cobbled roads and artifacts dating to Roman times.

Camels in Belgium?

Belgian archeologists Fabienne Pigière and Denis Henrotay have found evidence of camels in Belgium, specifically, camels used by the Romans near military and civilian towns. Their report can be found in an upcoming article for the Journal of Archaeological Science.

Solving the mystery of Roman Wales

Visitors to Caerleon, near Newport in south Wales have long admired the huge 1st century Roman amphitheater, the site of gladiatorial combat, but new discoveries point to the area as an important Roman outpost in Britain. (video)

Gotland bucket reveals silver and bronze

A bronze bucket filled to the brim with silver coins was found in a field on the island of Gotland, Sweden. The coins date to the Viking era.

Uncle Samulus wants YOU!

1,800 years ago, a mixed martial arts champion retired from the ring and decided to give back to his country, successfully using his celebrity to recruit for the army.

History of the Helmet

While the word helmet dates to the 15th century, military headgear has been around for much longer. This article traces the history of the helmet from ancient warfare to modern sports.

Roman kiln found in North Yorkshire

Plans for the new kitchen and classrom space are on hold at Norton primary school in North Yorkshire, England due to the discovery of a Roman kiln, complete with pottery fragments.

Sports scientists to look for archers aboard the Mary Rose

Sports physiologists are examining the skeletons found on the Mary Rose, an English ship that sank in 1545. They are looking for stress injuries and other markers that would indicate which skeletons were professional archers.

Medieval healing spring to be excavated

St. Ann's Well, a medieval healing spring in Nottingham, England, has been scheduled to be excavated sometime in 2012. The site, under a demolished pub, was once believed to have magical healing powers.

Beheaded skeletons might be victims of royal decree

Dr Britt Baillie, from the University of Cambridge, believes that 54 skeletons discovered in 2009 at Ridgeway Hill in England were Viking mercenaries from the time of Aethelred the Unready. All remains were found beheaded "in an unusual fashion from the front."

California Bay to be named after Sir Francis Drake

The U.S. Government is set to name a spot north of San Francisco, California after Sir Francis Drake, giving credance to that spot as the true location where Drake landed and claimed "Nova Albion" for Elizabeth I.

16th century secular frescoes found in Slovenia

A rare set of frescoes depicting secular themes have been found in a house in Slovenia. The frescoes depict men and women wearing the latest fashions.

Gold cross found in Anglo-Saxon bed grave

A grave of a young Anglo-Saxon woman lying on a bed has been found in Cambridgeshire. She was buried with a gold and garnet cross comparable in quality to the treasures found at Staffordshire and Sutton hoo. The cross was stitched to the woman's gown.

Reliving the Viking past in Dublin

Dublin's Viking past is everywhere in the city, from the Viking exhibition Dublinia to excavations at Dublin City Council headquarters. Join Catherine Le Nevez of Lonely Planet for a look at the city's Norse heritage.

Artifacts push back timeline on Spanish Colorado

Recent archaeological discoveries indicate the Spanish search for gold may have taken them into Colorado much earlier than previously thought.

The case for women Vikings

On her blog Bones Don't Lie, mortuary archaeologist Katy M. Meyers discusses proof of Viking women warriors in the 9th and 10th centuries in the form of swords found in female burial mounds. (photos)

Excerpts from "A history of Ireland in 100 objects"

In honor of St. Patrick's Day, here is a selection of some of the many medieval artifacts featured in The Irish Time's column A history of Ireland in 100 objects.

Iron age bog man gets his head examined

Worsely Man, the 1st century CE skull of a man found in an English bog in 1958, has been sent to Manchester Children's Hospital for a CAT (computer-assisted tomography) scan.

Portable Antiquities Scheme offers registry of British "treasures"

Metal detector hobbyists and amateur archaeologists in Great Britain are encouraged to record their discoveries of objects over 300 years old on the Portable Antiquities Scheme website, which also provides news and articles on British archaeological finds.

"Young Warrior's" grave reveals links to Kyivan Rus king

National Geographic's website offers a slideshow of artifacts discovered recently in eastern Europe. Among them are the remains from a grave in Poland dubbed the "Young Warrior."

Grant awarded to search for Viking "court circle" in Sherwood Forest

Several years ago, the Friends of Thynghowe, an amateur history group, was instrumental in discovering a Viking Thing in England's Sherwood Forest. Now the group has received a grant to search a wider area.

Guinea pig joins the ranks of favorite medieval pets

Was there a guinea pig sitting in the cage of a 16th century classroom? A new archaeological find proves it's possible. The 3rd ever early European guinea pig skeleton has been found in Belgium. Experts believe it was buried like a pet.

Ancient stone may hold the fate of modern London

The Stone of Scone and the Tower Ravens may have some competition. A fight has broken out over the fate of London's Stone of Brutus. A development company wants to relocate the stone, while tradition holds that, "So long as the Stone of Brutus is safe, so long will London flourish."

"Cumbrian Dragon" may have belonged to a knight

A stunning miniature of a 15th century knight slaying a dragon has been found in Carlisle, England. The cast silver gilt piece is of high quality and thought to be a piece of jewelery rather than a pilgrim's badge.

Evidence suggest that London was built by Iceni slaves

An essay from a recent issue of British Archaeology suggests that the city of London was  built as a military base by the captured Iceni tribesmen of rebel Queen Boudica, who were then executed. Author Dominic Perring bases his theory on the discovery of hundreds of skulls of young males.

Jewish bread stamp found in Acre

In the Israeli city of Acre around 500 CE, Larry the Baker left his mark. A ceramic Byzantine bread stamp has been unearthed bearing the classic Jewish seven branch Menorah and the name "Laurentius" written out in Greek letters.

Maria Vretmark and the mystery of the king's tomb

Maria Vretmark has a "fantastic story" to tell: Who is buried in King Magnus Ladulås' tomb? New DNA tests carried out by her team have determined that at least some of the bodies in the tomb in central Stockholm, Sweden are several centuries younger than the reign of Magnus, who ruled from 1275 until 1290.