Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Aberdeenshire barn could give "vital clues about medieval farm living"

Excavators from Scottish Hydro Electric (SHE) Transmission are accustomed to finding historic artifacts during their work. In fact, their team includes an archaeologist. Now a recent discovery of a 14th or 15th century barn has given her something exciting to study.

Rome's Colosseum in the Middle Ages

Once a scene of battle and carnage, Rome's Colosseum later became "a bustling medieval bazaar full of houses, stables and workshops." Evidence of the re-purposed site was collected recently during an archaeological dig.

Royal chapel found near Edinburgh

A team of archaeologists and volunteers have found evidence of a 16th century chapel, believed built by Sir Simon Preston in 1518 "to rest the souls of James III and IV. "

New Richard III exhibit sparks outcry

Historians and Richard III experts are outraged over an exhibit in the new Richard III Visitor Centre in Leicester, England which features the armor of the warrior king painted white, making him look like a "Star Wars stormtrooper." (photos, video)

Volunteers help find site of 13th century hospital

For three years, archaeologists have been looking for signs of a medieval hospital in Northumberland Park in Tyneside, England. 80 medieval burials have been found, and, in the last few days of the dig, a floor of glazed tiles, probably from the hospital's chapel. (photos)

The search for Süleyman's heart

In the summer of 1566, the great Ottoman sultan Süleyman the Magnificent was on a hard-fought attempt to capture Vienna, but his dream was not to be. The great leader died in his campaign tent, and his heart was buried there. Now the ongoing quest to discover the burial site of the heart continues with Norbert Pap, a professor of political geography at the nearby University of Pécs.

Burial discovery sheds light on late Roman Britain

The discovery of five skeletons dating to Roman times near a villa in Dorset, England has led archaeologists to postulate that they were from the same family. This is the first incidence of Roman families buried together near where they lived.

Protecting Ashby St Ledgers

Tiny, deserted, medieval villages across the English landscape have been disappearing, moving English Heritage to recommend historical designation to preserve what is left. Now the government of Northamptonshire is taking action by proclaiming such villages "scheduled monuments."

Newcastle renovation reveals medieval secrets

The development of a new commercial district in Newcastle, England has sparked interest in the medieval quayside life of the city, an area reclaimed from the River Tyne by the year 1400. Excavations have already uncovered a substantial sandstone wall and green-glazed pottery.

Conservation plan for Battle of Northampton site approved

"This year we are celebrating the rich and interesting story of Northampton and our nation. So it seems only fitting that we are looking carefully at how we can protect the site of one of the most significant battles fought on English soil," said Tim Hadland of the Northampton Borough Council about plans to preserve the Battle of Northampton site.

Re-enactors endanger Battle of Hastings site

Regular re-enactments of the Battle of Hastings witnessed by hordes of spectators may be endangering the archaeology of the historic site, but work by a team from the University of Huddersfield, led by Dr. Glenn Foard, is working to discover genuine artifacts from the battlefield.

New discoveries show Pictish heritage in Scotland

The Romans called the people of the north the "Painted Ones" due to their woad body painting, but little is known about the Pictish civilization. Now archaeologists working in Scotland's northern highlands have found evidence that the area may have been the people's power center.

Treasures of Scotland revealed

2013 was a "magnificent" year for archaeologists in Scotland. The recent annual Scottish Treasure Trove report, covering 1 April 2013 to 31 March 2014, by Queen's and Lord Treasurer's Remembrancer (QLTR) Catherine Dyer shows a variety of items including gold jewelry, coins and a Roman wine dipper. (photos)

Remains of Black Shuck found in ruins of Leiston Abbey?

An old legend in Suffolk, England, tells of a massive black dog, known as Black Shuck, which terrorized the village folk, and was the subject of a report in 1577 by the Reverend Abraham Fleming. Now archaeologists believe they have found the remains of a huge dog buried in the area. (photo)

Lincoln Castle reveals Saxon buried in his boots

The UK£22 million renovtion of Lincoln Castle continues to unearth medieval treasures, this time with the discovery of a high-status Saxon burial  in a church wall. The remains showed a powerful man, suffering from rickets, who was buried in his boots.

Remains of Henry VII of Luxembourg buried with rare silk cloth

Researchers in Italy have the rare opportunity to examine and analyze the remains of Henry VII of Luxembourg, German king and Holy Roman emperor, who died in 1313 and is buried in Pisa Cathedral. The remains were exhuned in 2013 to determine the emperor’s physical features and cause of death. (photos)

Medieval sewer system found at Drum Castle

Archaeologists working on a dig at Drum Castle in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, have discovered the remains of the medieval sanitation system which once surrounded the 14th-century Tower of Drum.

Earliest case of Down syndrome diagnosed in French skeleton

A team of archaeologists at the University of Bordeaux has identified the earliest known case of Down syndrome in the remains of a child who lived in 6th century France. The diagnosis was made after the remains were submitted to a (CT) scan.

Scottish burial may be 10th century King of Dublin

In 2005, archaeologists unearthed the remains of a person of importance near Auldhame in East Lothian, Scotland. Now experts believe that the burial might be that of the 10th Century Irish Viking King Olaf Guthfrithsson, who led raids in the area and reigned as King of Dublin and Northumbria.

New discoveries at Roman Maryport

Experts and volunteers from Oxford Archaeology have discovered what they believe is a "lost" Roman harbor along with a Roman fort at Maryport, on the west coast of Cumbria in England. The archaeological project hopes to "build up a picture of what ordinary life was like" in this part of Roman Britain.

Lost village discovered on Scottish borderland

A number of 16th century documents mention the village of Philiphaugh, with its "tower, fortalice, manors, gardens, orchards and mills," on the border between Scotland and England, but the settlement has long ago disappeared. Now new excavations may reveal where the town once stood. (photos)

Evidence of 1st century Roman military camp found in Germany

For generations, archaeologists have been looking for evidence of a Roman presence in eastern Germany, and with the discovery of a large, first century military camp near Hachelbich in Thuringia, they have found it.

Richard III: An Overview

The verdict is finally in: the remains of Richard III, England's last medieval king, will be laid to rest, with great pomp and circumstance, in Leicester Cathedral after judges put an end to requests that he be buried in York. The BBC's Greig Watson has an overview of the Richard saga. (photos)

Human remains mark Saxon settlement near London

Gardeners working at a private home in Purley, England near London, were surprised to unearth a skull and thigh bone dating to the 7th of 8th century. The remains are believed by experts to be Saxon, and are considered a "significant archaeological discovery."

Norfolk "Q-tip" declared treasure

Everyday toilet implements, such as an ear scoop found by a metal detectorist, were among the recently-declared treasures in King's Lynn, Norfolk, England. Also discussed was an early Anglo-Saxon "gold and garnet cloisonné circular domed object." (photos)

Late medieval history course online

For those interested in furthering their knowledge of medieval English history, a team of scholars from the University of Leicester is offering a free, online course entitled England in the time of King Richard III.

York tomb remains show long history of religious use

Archaeologists working at All Saints Church in York, England have discovered skeletons of individuals dating back at least 1100 years. Remains included that of a pregnant woman and her fetus and three men shoved together in the tomb. (photos)

"Only individual ever recorded related to the Norman invasion" found in East Sussex

Skeleton 180 might be a very remarkable individual: the only person recorded related to the Norman invasion of England. Buried in a medieval cemetery, 180 was believed to have died at the Battle of Lewes in 1264, but scientists have now placed his death around 1066.

Remains of King Erik the Holy to be studied

A team of scientists from Uppsala University in Sweden will be studying the remains of King Erik the Holy, a medieval Swedish king later canonized as Saint Erik. Researchers hope to discover more about the 12th century monarch including how he lived and his origins. (photo)

Coins and hacksilver found in Netherlands

Precious metals were scarce during the decline of the Roman Empire in Germanic Europe, which would explain the recent discovery of a hoard of "gold coins and pieces of silver tableware which had been deliberately cut up (hacksilver)" in a field near Limburg in the Netherlands. (photos)