Archaeology

Archaeology and related sciences

Lost village discovered on Scottish borderland

A number of 16th century documents mention the village of Philiphaugh, with its "tower, fortalice, manors, gardens, orchards and mills," on the border between Scotland and England, but the settlement has long ago disappeared. Now new excavations may reveal where the town once stood. (photos)

Evidence of 1st century Roman military camp found in Germany

For generations, archaeologists have been looking for evidence of a Roman presence in eastern Germany, and with the discovery of a large, first century military camp near Hachelbich in Thuringia, they have found it.

Richard III: An Overview

The verdict is finally in: the remains of Richard III, England's last medieval king, will be laid to rest, with great pomp and circumstance, in Leicester Cathedral after judges put an end to requests that he be buried in York. The BBC's Greig Watson has an overview of the Richard saga. (photos)

Human remains mark Saxon settlement near London

Gardeners working at a private home in Purley, England near London, were surprised to unearth a skull and thigh bone dating to the 7th of 8th century. The remains are believed by experts to be Saxon, and are considered a "significant archaeological discovery."

Norfolk "Q-tip" declared treasure

Everyday toilet implements, such as an ear scoop found by a metal detectorist, were among the recently-declared treasures in King's Lynn, Norfolk, England. Also discussed was an early Anglo-Saxon "gold and garnet cloisonné circular domed object." (photos)

Late medieval history course online

For those interested in furthering their knowledge of medieval English history, a team of scholars from the University of Leicester is offering a free, online course entitled England in the time of King Richard III.

York tomb remains show long history of religious use

Archaeologists working at All Saints Church in York, England have discovered skeletons of individuals dating back at least 1100 years. Remains included that of a pregnant woman and her fetus and three men shoved together in the tomb. (photos)

"Only individual ever recorded related to the Norman invasion" found in East Sussex

Skeleton 180 might be a very remarkable individual: the only person recorded related to the Norman invasion of England. Buried in a medieval cemetery, 180 was believed to have died at the Battle of Lewes in 1264, but scientists have now placed his death around 1066.

Remains of King Erik the Holy to be studied

A team of scientists from Uppsala University in Sweden will be studying the remains of King Erik the Holy, a medieval Swedish king later canonized as Saint Erik. Researchers hope to discover more about the 12th century monarch including how he lived and his origins. (photo)

Coins and hacksilver found in Netherlands

Precious metals were scarce during the decline of the Roman Empire in Germanic Europe, which would explain the recent discovery of a hoard of "gold coins and pieces of silver tableware which had been deliberately cut up (hacksilver)" in a field near Limburg in the Netherlands. (photos)

Wark Castle vanguard of Flodden 500 project

The Battle of Flodden, between the Scottish and English kings, took place in 1513. Now the battle is being commemorated by experts and volunteers for the Flodden 500 Archaeological project. The focus for 2014 will be Wark Castle on the Northumberland side of the River Tweed.

Monastery diet revealed by Durham Cathedral excavation

Archaeologists working on an excavation of a portion of Durham Cathedral, destined to become an exhibition space for the relics of St. Cuthbert, have unearthed over 20,000 animal bones and a "massive amount" of food waste. The site was once part of the monastery's 14th century kitchen. (photos)

The man who broke the Sutton Hoo story

In 1939, the biggest news in archaeology was the discovery of the Sutton Hoo ship burial in Suffolk, England. In a feature story for EADT24, Mike Bowden discusses how his father, Alfred Bowden, known as “Bow,’’ broke the story of the discovery. (photos)

Cambuskenneth Abbey part of Bannockburn archaological study

The 700th anniversary of the Scottish victory at Bannockburn has brought together archaeologists and experts from a number of fields to study the battle. Among the sites investigated is Cambuskenneth Abbey near Stirling where Robert the Bruce held several of his early parliaments.

Roman house subject of 2014 dig at Maryport

Roman Maryport, near the western edge of Hadrian's Wall, has produced a number of interesting artifacts in previous digs. In 2014, archaeologists will focus on the investigation of a large, 3-room, stone-strip building discovered in 2013. (pictures)

Medieval archway found under Cardigan Castle floor

NPS Archaeology, working on an 18-month excavation at Wales' Cardigan Castle, has unearthed a stone archway dating to the 12th century beneath the floor of the castle. The archway is believed to have led to the tower of the original castle.

Accidental Medieval Siberian Mummies Discovered

Just 29 km from the Arctic Circle, near Zeleniy Yar in Siberia, a group of bodies dating back to the Middle Ages have been found in shallow graves.

Seeking Howe's

600 years ago, Howe's was a satellite community of Cambridge, England. Then it disappeared off the map. Now archaeologists have begun investigating Howe's, along with three other villages, that ringed the medieval university town.

First century irrigation system found in England

Archaeologists working on a development site in Cambridge, England have discovered what they believe is Great Britain's oldest irrigation system. The Roman site includes evidence of planting beds and pit wells.

Crowdsourcing funds Leiston Abbey dig

Crowd funding and sourcing have reached the archaeological community on the grounds of 12th century Leiston Abbey in Suffolk, England where amateurs funded experts for a two-week project in exchange for a chance to participate.

International team to search for Grunwald Battle location

For centuries, historians have debated the location of the Battle of Grunwald, fought 15 July 1410 between the Kingdom of Poland and the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and the German–Prussian Teutonic Knights. Now members of an international team will begin looking in the Great Stream Valley in Poland.

Bread oven and sewing kit found in Northampton dig

An archaeological excavation in Northampton, England, has thus far revealed the remains of a bread oven, a 13th century well, a 15th century sewing kit and trading tokens, leading experts to believe that there was a settlement in the area. (photos)

Rendlesham exhibit marks 75th anniversary of Sutton Hoo discovery

Four miles northest of the Sutton Hoo ship burials lie what archaeologists believe are the remains of the royal settlement of Rendlesham, mentioned in the 8th century by the Venerable Bede. Finds from recent archaeological excavations will be on display during the 75th anniversary celebration of the Sutton Hoo finds in 2014.

Winter storms reveal leg bones of monk

Alas, poor monk, whose eternal rest was disturbed by the discovery of his leg bones protruding from a cliff along the sea shore of Monknash, South Wales. The remains are believed to be from a young Cistercian monk who lived at the nearby 12 century abbey. (photo)

Stinky surprise for Danish archaeologists

 Archaeologists working on a site in Odense on Funen, Denmark were treated to an odiferous surprise recently with the discovry of 14th century barrels used to contain the contents of latrines.

Vikings invade British Museum

Not since the 11th century have Vikings made such a big splash in England as with the opening of the new BP-sponsored exhibition at the British Museum in London, Vikings: life and legend. The exhibit opened march 6, 2014 and will close June 22. (photos)

Retired professor saves 8th century Indian mint

Manmohan Kumar, a retired professor from Maharishi Dayanand University, Rohtak, India, was concerned about urbanization engulfing historic archaeological sites near Haryana. His pleas motivated a team from the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) to explore the area, where it unearthed the remains of an 8th century mint. (photos)

Viking mass grave findings generate book and museum exhibition

In 2009, a Dorset County, England road project uncovered the remains of 50 decapitated skeletons, later identified as Viking. Now the mass grave is the subject of a book, Given to the Ground: A Viking Age Mass Grave on Ridgeway Hill by members of the team that subsequently studied the remains. (photos)

The "peaceful conquest" of Roman Britain

Everyone knows that the transition from Roman Britain to Anglo-Saxon England was a brutal time -- everyone but Dr Andrew Millard, from Durham University, whose new study in the Journal of Archaeological Science, shows a more peaceful process. (maps)

Murder declared in Scotland

An unidentified 20-year-old man has been found murdered in Kirk Ness in East Lothian, Scotland, but the murderer will not likely be found. The victim, fatally stabbed four times in the back, was killed in the 12th or 13th century.