Places of Worship

Churches, Mosques, Temples, Synagogues, Cathedrals, and similar structures used primarily for worship (this category is about the buildings, not the religions)

Search on for St. Columba's Scottish monastery

Archaeologists from Orkney College are looking for the original 6th century monastery built by the Irish monk St. Columba on the island of Iona, off Mull in the Scottish Hebrides.

Gothic text found in Salisbury Cathedral

Experts working on restoration of the Henry Hyde monument in Salisbury Cathedral have discovered remnants of Gothic text beneath whitewash on the cathedral wall.

Stonehenge site of midwinter feast

A recent study of pig and cattle bones found near Stonehenge has led researchers to believe that it was the site of huge winter solstice feasts. Experts believe animals were herded to the site and then slaughtered to feed celebrants.

Medieval remains and pottery found in Georgia monastery

Archaeologists working on the excavation at the church of Ayios Nikolaos, on the site of the 10th century Georgian Monastery, at Gialia village in Paphos, have discovered four ossuaries containing human remains.

Saint Nicholas in Turkey

St. Nicholas, the 4th century Christian saint who influenced so many Christmas traditions, is thought to have lived and died in Myra, Turkey. His remains were removed to Bari in southern Italy in the 11th century. Now Turkish officials would like to see Nicholas' basilica restored.

A survey of English cathedrals

In an extensive history article, which looks at major cathedrals in England, the BBC considers several grand houses of worship and their importance in British life.

A short walk through England's cathedrals

Can't afford a ticket to Great Britain this winter? Take a minute to tour England's glorious cathedrals in a short slideshow from the BBC.

Duct tape holding up Canterbury Cathedral

How can you tell when the economic crisis has reached epic proportions in great Britain? When the marble pillars of Canterbury Cathedral, the seat of the Anglican Church and site of the murder of St. Thomas a Becket, are being held together with duct tape.

Sites of conquest

A new series of articles in the online BBC History Magazine will cover famous historical sites. The first article looks at ten "places associated with the momentous events of 1066 and its aftermath."

Canadians to search for New World's oldest church

Experts from the Newfoundland and Labrador archaeological communities are making plans to begin a search for a 510-year-old church on the western shore of Conception Bay, thought to be North America's earliest Christian settlement.

Tudor bells return to Ipswich

Five 500-year-old church bells, believed to be the oldest in England, have been returned to St Lawrence Church, in Ipswich, Suffolk after a UK£100,000 restoration project. The bells had previously not been rung for 20 years due to their poor condition.

Canterbury's oak rafters date to Norman times

Restoration work at England's Canterbury Cathedral has uncovered oak roof rafters dating to the time of William the Conqueror. While much of the cathedral's roof has been destroyed and rebuilt over the centuries, some of the 11th century timbers survive.

UK£138,000 English Heritage.grant saves 14th century chapel

Matthew Saunders, honorary director of The Friends of Friendless Churches in Mundon, England, reports that the organization has received a UK£138,000 grant from English Heritage to preserve St Mary's Church, the medieval chapel of a manor house. (photo)

5th century Byzantine cathedral and human remains found in Syria

An early Byzantine cathedral, complete with columns and stairs, has been discovered by the excavation team in Tal Al-Hasaka site in north eastern Syria. Also found was the "skeleton of a human who died of torture."

Dig shows Irish monks strove to be "green"

Archaeologists working on a dig at the Cistercian Bective Abbey in Co Meath, Ireland believe they have evidence of the country's first environmentalists. The abbey monks, dependent on handouts from their neighbors, worked hard to become as self sufficient as possible.

First known Jewish temple found in Lycia

Archaeologists excavating the ancient port city of Andriake in Lycia have discovered what they believe is the "first archaeological trace of Jewish culture" found in the area. They believe the temple was one of the earliest built after a 212 C.E. law allowed Jews to become Roman citizen.

Orkney neolithic cathedral "built to impress"

A 65 ft. (21 meter) long structure dating back 5,000 years has been discovered at the Ness of Brodgar in Scotland's Orkney Islands. The walls of the structure, which would have been 16ft (5 meters) thick and surrounding a cross-shaped inner sanctum, still stand.

Grant will fund dig at Cumbrian abbey

Officials at English Heritage Lottery have announced that the Holm Cultram Abbey in Abbeytown, England has received a grant for UK£48,000 to carry out an extensive at the Cistercian abbey.

Monastery of the Bulgarian Patriarch and French ring found in medieval capital

A team of archaeologists, led by Professor Nikolay Ovcharov, has discovered the walls of what they believe is the the Monastery of the Bulgarian Patriarch in the 13th century in Veliko Tarnovo, the country's medieval capital.

Connecticut's 5th Century Christian Church

A researcher believes a site in Connecticut is an early Christian church, built by Byzantine monks who fled from North Africa during the 5th Century, in the wake of the Vandal invasions.

"One of the most important early medieval sites in Wales" threatened by development

The discovery of a tiny sword stud beneath a shop in Monmouth, Wales has archaeologists excited - and worried. The stud has led to the discovery of evidence of a 10th century Anglo Saxon settlement in the area, a discovery now threatened by commercial development.

Five medieval skeletons found in Mickleham

Construction work on a new vestry at St Michael's Church in Mickleham, England has led to the discovery of five graves dating from at least the 15th century, one belonging to a small child. The graves are believed to mark the location of the medieval churchyard.

New excavations at Stonehenge may prove site a place of sacred healing

It has been over 40 years since any significant excavation have been done at Stonehenge, but during the spring of 2009, that changed when Timothy Darvill, professor of archaeology at Bournemouth University, and Geoffrey Wainwright, president of the Society of Antiquaries of London, headed a new dig in the monument's inner circle.

"Lost" 12th century church found in Swyddffynnon, Wales

A team of archaeologists using a geophysical survey have discovered what is believed to be Capel y Groes, a grange chapel built in 1165 and connected to nearby Strata Florida Abbey. The church was last recorded on maps in the mid 19th century and considered "lost" since that time.

[DRA] Winchester Pilgrimage IV

Come all ye pilgrims and travelers, and join the Shire of West Dragoningshire for a pilgrimage at the Hospital of St Cross and Almshouse of Noble Poverty. Share with us in an evening of Chaucer; a morning pilgrimage to Winchester Cathedral, an afternoon demonstration of our fighting skills, and an evening of feasting and storytelling.

Swedish parking marker found to be runestone

Rainy weather, washing mud from a parking lot marker in Sweden, brought about a near "religious experience" for Stockholm County Museum runic expert Lars Andersson, who was able to identify marks on the stone as runes.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 15, 1489

Ottoman architect Koca Mi’mar Sinan Aga , usually referred to as Sinan, was born on April 15, 1489. His innovative approach was to transform the Ottoman civic and religious architecture of the Ottoman classical period.

California monks reconstruct 800 year old building

Monks at the Abbey of New Clairvaux in Vina, California are rebuilding an 800 year old chapter house transported from Ovila, Spain to California in 1931 by William Randoph Hearst.

Westminster Chapter House to undergo renovation

The Chapter House of Westminster Abbey is crumbling, its stonework decaying and pocked with WWII shrapnel scars, its stone carvings damaged, but there is relief in sight in the form of a £2m restoration program to repair the 13th century octagonal building.

Roman temples discovered in England

British Channel Four's Time Team has discovered the remains of four Roman temples near Redbourn, England. The temples may have been built to worship water gods, according to experts, since there are springs and a river in the area.