European

Cultures of Europe

Female musicians?

 I'm trying to put together a persona based around the occupation of musician/storyteller/performer, but I'm having difficulty finding information. So far all I've got is vague references to the existence of trobairitz, menestrelles and jongleuse, but few dates or references.

Met to present Burgundian/Dutch Renaissance exhibit

The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City will present Man, Myth, and Sensual Pleasures: Jan Gossart's Renaissance October 6, 2010 - January 17, 2011, the "first major exhibition in forty-five years devoted to the Burgundian Netherlandish artist Jan Gossart (ca. 1478-1532)."

Can national stereotypes survive the European Union?

Flamboyant lovers, opionated cowards, unshaved barbarians - some of the barbs that Europeans have used against their neighbors are as old as the nations themselves.

Titania's Garden Art Jewelry and Chain Maille by Jennifer Wong

Titania's Garden artist Jennifer Wong creates and purveys jewelry from metal and stones, as well as chain maille jewelry.

Silver hoard found in Bulgaria

Archeologists have discovered a cache of 166 silver coins hidden in a jar in the floor of a medieval home. The home is within the fortress of Kastritsi.

Europe's forgotten castles

Travel writer and television host Rick Steves offers his thoughts on castles to vists that are off the beaten path. The castles are in ruins and offer a dramatic charm all their own. [photo]

Oxfordshire balloonist spots Bronze Age sites

Drought and extreme heat in England have made it possible to see ancient sites normally hidden by vegetation. Balloonist Michael Wolf saw dark circles in a farmer's field and realized these were evidence of Bronze Age burial mounds.

Vlad the Misunderstood

An exhibit in Bucharest, Romania, is trying to rehabilitate the image of Vlad Dracula, aka Vlad the Impaler. The exhibit uses period illustrations and manuscripts to show the 15th century Wallachian ruler as the victim of Western European propaganda intended to show Eastern Europe in a barbaric light.

Who really named America?

We all know the schoolboy version of the naming of the American continents: merchant explorer Amerigo Vespucci supposedly named the New World after himself. But a little-known proofreader and scholar named Matthias Ringmann may actually be responsible.

Armorers prepare for upcoming battle reenactment (and it's not Pennsic!)

Armourers like Tomasz Samula are making last minute adjustments to the arms and armour for the Lublin Knights, who will gather Saturday on the field where the Polish-Lithuanian army defeated a force of Teutonic knights near this Polish village in 1410.

La Boheme Bijoux

La Boheme Bijoux offers an elegant collection of vintage-inspired gemstone and crystal jewelry, including a section of designs inspired by the works of William Shakespeare. This site is a resource for the historical costume enthusiast who loves to complete her ensembles by wearing beautiful one-of-a-kind and limited edition handmade jewelry.

El Niño may have caused famine in medieval Europe

A new study by a team of scientists from the University of Miami finds that El Niño and La Niña may have caused cooling in the central Pacific, leading to drought in medieval Europe.

University of California recipient of large donation of medieval books

An anonymous donor has given to the University of California, Riverside, a book and manuscript collection oriented toward medieval history and valued at almost US$100K.

Cleveland galleries reopen after renovation

The Cleveland Museum of Art announced that six more of its permanent galleries, including the medieval gallery and the gallery of European painting and sculpture 1500-1800, will reopen June 26, 2010 after extensive renovation.

Tycho Brahe to be exhumed

A November exhumation is planned to try to discover the true cause of Tycho Brahe's death. Since a 1901 analysis discovered mercury in a sample of his beard, some have believed the astronomer, "more famous in death than he ever was in life," was murdered.

Website traces European effigies

The Effigies and Brasses website offers links and images for numerous European effigies, brasses, incised slabs, half-reliefs, and other miscellaneous representations dating from the 12th-15th centuries.

Show of Medieval Ivories at Munich Museum

Ivory works of art separated for centuries have been reunited in a new show at the Bayerisches Nationalmuseum in Munich, Germany. Objects that originally stood together but found their way to separate collections are on display side by side until December 2010.

Precious Cambridge manuscript collection now online

The entire Parker library, a collection of Anglo-Saxon manuscripts at Corpus Christi College of Cambridge University, has been made accessible online. Librarian Suzanne Paul narrates a video tour of the collection's highlights.

Baltimore Art Museum Receives Grant to Digitize Manuscripts

The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore has received a National Endowment for the Humanities grant to digitize more than 100 medieval manuscripts from a wide range of European and Near East cultures.

Wet summers may have contributed to devastation of Black Plague

A team of scientists, who have studied tree rings and medieval wooden architectural materials to determine the climate of the late Middle Ages, report that wet summers were a contributing factor to the disaster of the Black Death in the 14th century.

Debate over Initial Settlement of Iceland

Who were the first European settlers to come to Iceland? Were they truly Ingólfur Arnarson his wife Hallgerdur Fródadóttir, as told in Íslendingabók (Book of Icelanders)?

Alpha Officium -- An online mint and SCA Moneyer resource

"If you need a reign coin, site token, or mercenary pay coin-we have it here." After 25 years of Moneyers Guild work throughout the SCA, Master Emmerich of Vakkerfjell, OL, OP, has opened the internet doors on his very own online "Mint." For those that need a coin from almost any period, for almost any event-he suggests, "pay a visit."

Walters Art Museum to Digitize Medieval Manuscripts

The Walters Art Museum in Baltimore, MD plans to digitize 105 medieval manuscripts from its 38,000 page collection. The project, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, will take approximate 2 1/2 years to complete.

Dark Ages really more "gray," say economists

In a recent story for NPR's All Things Considered, Madeleine Brand discusses new theories about the Dark Ages, the medieval spice trade, and the Black Plague with Chana Joffe-Walt and Adam Davidson.

New merchant: Paternoster Ladies opens its doors online

Paternoster Ladies recently opened their new online shopping portal, using the Etsy e-commerce hosting provider.

Paternoster Ladies

Paternoster Ladies produces one-of-a-kind handmade medieval rosaries, paternosters and chaplets for sale. Their line uses historically available materials to create items inspired by medieval sources such as museum examples and artwork of the time period. Many of their raw materials come from upcycling antique and vintage beads and findings, and the results are pure heaven.

Around the world with Father Christmas

Christmas traditions are cherished around the world. One that is nearly universal is the legend of a friendly spirit who delivers gifts during the Christmas season. TopTenz.net offers their list of Top 10 Santa Legends From Around the World.

Latin students create wiki for the "Study of Ancient Gaul and Ancient Celtic Culture"

Students of the John Carroll School Latin 2 class found themselves dissatisfied with their textbook depiction of ancient Celts and Gauls. Their solution? Create a wiki of online links relating to the subject. (map)

War of Troy Tapestry returns to the V&A

Once a jewel of the Victoria and Albert Museum, the War of Troy Tapestry was removed from exhibit twenty years ago "when it became too damaged to display." Now, after 4,000 hours of restoration, the tapestry will once again take a place of honor in the museum. (photos)

Minnesota professor to receive grant for medieval globalization research

University of Minnesota professor Susan Noakes has received a US$70,000 grant for two years for a project entitled “Globalization of the Middle Ages.” The research will be funded by the university's Imagine Fund.