Linguistics

General category for the study of written and spoken language across various cultures. This category indicates articles related to the science of linguistics, rather than just to a specific language (which would be indicated by the relevant culture or country name).

Latin through the eyes of a gladiator

Marcia Ross of ORR High School in southeastern Massachusetts has found a unique way to teach elementary school age children Latin. She frames the after-school enrichment program as "Latin through the eyes of a gladiator."

The sound of Shakespeare's English

A new British Library recording offers scenes from Shakespeare spoken in a reconstruction of the Elizabethan accent. NPR's Weekend Edition interviewed Ben Crystal, who directed and acted in the project.

Will linguistic research pinpoint 9th century battlefield?

Keith Briggs, a visiting research fellow in linguistics at the University of the West of England, believes he has discovered Hægelisdun, the site of the 869 CE battle between the East Anglians and the Vikings which led to the death of St Edmund. His research involves the use of linguistics.

Irish schoolgirl creates method to date ancient manuscripts

Sixteen-year-old Aoife Gregg of Loreto College, St Stephen’s Green, Ireland recently competed in a science competition. Her project: a computer letter frequency analysis of ancient Irish texts to demonstrate how the language has changed.

New botany rules jetison Latin

New rules, approved by the International Botanical Congress in July, will no longer require Latin descriptions of new species for publication in online academic journals and books. The change will be implemented to "speed up the process of officially recognizing new plant species."

The story of the English language - in 10 funny sessions

Attention linguists! Prepare for your tutorial on the History of the English Language as presented by OpenLearn. The ten one-minute video sessions are narrated by Clive Anderson and illustrated by animated line drawings. Get your pencils - and senses of humor - ready.

Professor investigates newly-discovered Missouri runestone

Dr. James Frankki, of Sam Houston State University, has studied the Kensington Runestone in Minnesota and the Heavener Runestone in Oklahoma. Now he is taking look at a recently-discovered stone in Missouri.

Irish Central's list of 10 most popular Irish surnames

The website Irish Central has posted a list of the 10 most popular Irish last names, including meaning of the name, variations, and the area where the name is most prominent.

Pict Persona

Looking for any information on the Picts (who lived in northern Pre-Scottland) aside from Wikipedia. Theories on language are very welcome. :) Thank you.

Talking Shakespeare

Actor and author Ben Crystal explores the accents of Shakespearean English in a series of videos based on his book Shakespeare on Toast. Crystal offers examples of Received Pronunciation and Shakespearean Pronunciation. (video)

From Anglo-Saxons to the Internet in 10 minutes

Open University has created a series of 10 short videos chronicling the history of the English language. The series, found on YouTube, is entitled The History of English in Ten Minutes.

Relaxing with Latin over coffee

Students at Liberty Common High School in Fort Collins, Colorado, are not totally taking a summer break from their studies. Marques Kem's Latin class will meet over coffee to discuss The Aeneid by Virgil.

Minimus brings Latin education to school kids

For the last five years, a little mouse has been responsible for bringing Latin back to English schoolrooms. Minimus: Starting out in Latin, by Barbara Bell, is the story of a rodent living in the home of a Roman family in Vindolanda.

Ancient Greek dialect spoken in Turkey

Researchers have found an isolated community on the coast of Turkey who speak a dialect of Greek very close to ancient Greek. Romeyka, a variety of Pontic Greek, has grammar and vocabulary that are otherwise only found in ancient forms of the language, but it has no alphabet.

Latin lost language in Iowa

"We’ll come to Xavier if you teach us Latin." said the granddaughters of Justin Kramer, who is teaches the language at one of only two schools in the state of Iowa."

Historic occupations as surnames

Those searching for period names may wish to visit the Rootsweb website, which includes an extensive list of period occupations with descriptions, many of which have become surnames.

"Magistri" to bring Latin to British schoolchildren

The Iris Project wants to bring the classics to British schools. To that end, the charity is sending "Oxford University undergraduates into primary schools in Blackbird Leys, Headington and Kidlington to teach the ancient language to nine and 10-year-olds."

Experts debate meaning of symbols on Pictish stones

The debate continues among archeologists and linguists over the symbols on over 200 carved stones dating to the time of the Picts in Scotland. Archeologists feel that the carvings are "symbolic markings that communicated information."

How Normans changed the English language forever

In 1066, William the Conqueror invaded England. Since then, Norman names, such as William, Henry and Alice, have dominated Brittish naming preferences, and it is in the language where they may have left their greatest mark.

Archeologists discover trace of unknown Peruvian language

Archeologists digging at Magdalena de Cao Viejo in Peru have found a letter written in the eary 17th century by a Spanish colonist. On the back of the letter is a list of numbers written in Spanish, Arabic numerals, and an unknown language.

Domesday Book by map and charter

A new website, PASE Domesday, allows users to search William the Conqueror's 1086 Domesday book by person and village. The results can be seen in tabular or map form.

Researcher to document native Greenland language

A British anthropologist is going to live for a year with the Inughuit in Greenland in the hopes of studying and documenting their language. The Inughuit are the northernmost tribe of Inuits in Greenland and speak Inuktun, a non-written language that is considered a pure dialect of Inuit.

What the Romans (and Greeks) can do for us

Latin teacher and blogger Denis Ambrose, Jr. is often asked to justify his existence to people who think "high school is nothing more than preparation for college, and college is nothing more than job training." He has compiled a list of five pragmatic reasons to study classics.

"Long lost language of the Picts" identified

Long thought to be artistic images of hunters and animals, the engravings on the famous Iron Age Pictish Stones are now believed to be the written language of the Pictish people, an ancient language recognized by the Venerable Bede.

Keeping Alive the Language Jesus Spoke

In the village of Maaloula, Syria, the ancient language Aramaic is still spoken but endangered.

How to speak like a medieval person

THL Justinian Clarus, of the Kingdom of Ealdormere, reports that he has created a website for his class Speaking Forsoothly for Newcomers.

Scots do not regard "Scots" as a language

A recent Scottish campaign to restore the Scottish language is meeting with some resistance - from the Scottish people.

Mel Gibson considers film about Norse warriors

For his next project, filmmaker Mel Gibson may be returning to a childhood dream. "The very first idea that I ever had about making a film, my first thought ever about being a filmmaker was when I was 16-years-old, and I wanted to make a Viking movie," Gibson told journalists at a press event.

Scottish reporter finds Latin mass a "chilling experience"

"There was no heating in the Sacred Heart RC church in Bridgeton, a vast 100-year-old building in the bosom of a parish first established in 1873. Perhaps that was because there were only 31 of us in the congregation, but being freezing cold certainly helped focus the mind. After all, they do say austerity is good for the soul," writes reporter Cate Devine of the Herald Scotland after attending a recent Latin mass.

Grammar of medieval and early-modern Greek subject of major study

A major multi-year study, five years underway, seeks to provide the first detailed grammar of the 3400-year-old Greek language as it evolved from 1100 to 1700 CE.