Byzantine

The Eastern Roman Empire

New Judith Herrin book offers "Byzantine surprise!"

A jaded den of deceit and treachery is the common perception of the medieval Byzantine Empire, but a new book by Judith Herrin offers a different interpretation, one that includes a rich cultural and religious life. M.M. Bennetts has the review for the Christian Science Monitor.

Onager Catapult Kits

Onager offers replicas of ancient catapults as used by the Romans and other cultures up until the medieval period. These are fully functional wooden kits. Makes a great display piece, science project or gift for anyone with an interest in history, engineering or physics.

Errant Knight Jewellery

Errant Knight offers stunning hand-made authentic artefact replicas including court belts, sword and armour belts and jewelry. All items are thoroughly researched to ensure historical accuracy.

Byzantine-era synagogue sheds light on Jewish life

Jewish scholars are having to rethink opinions about life and culture in early Byzantine times after the discovery of a 5th century synagogue, complete with elaborate mosaic floors.

Roman-era synagogue found near Sea of Galilee

The remains of a late Roman-Byzantine-era synagogue have been discovered in the Arbel National Park near the Sea of Galilee. The building is thought to date from the 2nd to 4th century C.E.

Early Christian Art showcased in Venice

An new exhibit, Early Christian Art Between Rome and Byzantium, will showcase over 90 works from twenty Italian museums at the Intesa San Paolo's Palazzo Leoni Montanari. The show runs until November 18, 2007.

Byzantine Bash

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The Barony of Selviergard invites the Knowne World to attend a feast honoring Constantine the Great in traditional Byzantine style! Please bring your banners, flags, tapestries and other decorations to make the hall more colorful.

The victor of the heavy combat tournament will be awarded the purple chlamys, a traditional gift from the ancient Basillius' of that time as a show of his great prowess and favor from the powers that be. Location:
Barony of Selviergard (Chugiak, Alaska)

5th century Byzantine church found in Israel

A team of Israeli archaeologists working on a site near the city of Tiberias have discovered an ancient Byzantine church believed to date from the 5th century.

Byzantine mosaic found in Israel

An elaborately-decorated mosaic floor dating to the 6th century has been discovered near the Israeli city of Palmahim. The floor is thought to have belonged to the dining area of a Byzantine villa.

Russian participants to re-enact battle for Constantinople

Re-enactors in Russia are preparing an elaborate re-enactment of the 1453 battle for Constantinople, in which it was conquered by the Ottoman Turks.

Byzantines meet virtual reality

Understanding what life was like in the historic past will take a giant step soon with the introduction of by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to combine 3-D computer technology with the latest historical evidence. The result: a virtual walk-around of historic buildings.

The story of a flea

In a review for The Guardian, Ian Pindar discusses a new book about bubonic plague: Justinian's Flea by William Rosen, an "impressive study of the bubonic plague and its impact on history."

Oxford to open new centre for Classical and Byzantine studies

Thanks to a donation of more than UK£1 million from the Ioannou family, Greek Cypriots, Oxford University in England will open a new center for Classical and Byzantine research and study.

Turkey Restores Ancient Armenian Church as Show of Goodwill

Akdamar Church, also called the Church of Surp Khach, or Holy Cross, an Armenian structure dating back to 921 C.E., is being restored in a US$1.5 million project being undertaken by Turkey as a step towards improving relationships between the two neighboring countries.

Ravenna: Italy's mosaic treasure trove

Joan Scobey of the Post-Gazette travels to Ravenna, Italy, the ancient capital of three empires, and describes its historic pleasures for her readers.

Wastelands 2007

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Wastelands: A Journey to Constantinople

June 22-24, 2007

As long, sunny days and warm nights herald in the summer months, we invite you to travel with us. Our destination is the heart of the Eastern Roman Empire, the jewel of Byzantium, the glorious city of Constantinople.

So don your traveling clothes and spend the first weekend of summer with friends, fighting, feasting and fun! Location:
Elchenburg Castle, Barony of Sacred Stone, Atlantia

Today in the Middle Ages: December 27, 537

The Emperor Justinian dedicated the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople on Devember 27, 537 C.E.

Early Byzantine Costume Research Papers Online

Meghan Elphinstone, Arts & Sciences Champion for the Barony of Marinus in Atlantia, has posted her extensive research on early Byzantine costuming. The two papers are available in PDF format.

Turkish Journey Yields Great Research Photos

Lady Isabelle in the Kingdom of Meridies recently traveled to Turkey and shares photos from her visit online.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 5, 610

In the process of deposing and replacing the Byzantine emperor Phocas, Heraclius attacked Constantinople with a fleet on October 5, 610 C.E.

Byzantine Port Found

"Like Romans, Athenians and other residents of the world's great historic cities, the residents of Istanbul can hardly put a shovel in the ground without digging up something important." Archaelogists working on the site of a new subway station believe they have found a port from Byzantine times.

Scientists Hope to Uncover Secrets of Prayerbook

A team of scientists is using X-ray techniques to try to decipher the text hidden beneath a 13th century Christian prayerbook. They believe that underneath the prayers is a lost original work by the Greek mathematician Archimedes

Byzantine Exhibit Includes Classical Themes

An exhibition of Byzantine artifacts shows how the classical style of the Greeks and Romans carried over into the Middle Ages. The Road to Byzantium: Luxury Arts of Antiquity, an exhibit which runs through September 3, 2006 at London's Sometset House, shows a wide range of pieces decorated with classical themes.

Today in the Middle Ages: July 16, 1054

On July 16, 1054, the Pope excommunicated Michael Cerularius, Patriarch of Constantinople, setting in motion the events which would divide the Eastern Orthodox from the Roman Church.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 29, 1453

Orthodox Christian Constantinople fell to the Turks on May 29, 1453, a date that some historians consider the end of the Middle Ages.

Travel in Croatia

Travel writer James Stewart writes for Times on Line about travel in Croatia.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 7, 558

On May 7, 558, the dome of the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople collapsed after an earthquake.

Byzantine Discoveries Could Jeopardize Turkish Tunnel Plans

The recent discovery of the original port of Constantinople on the banks of the Bosporus may throw a monkey wrench into Turkey's ambitious plan to construct a UK£2 billion train tunnel linking Europe to Asia.

In-Fighting Threatens Church of the Nativity

Squabbling over repairs to the basilica commemorating the birthplace of Jesus may endanger the Church of the Nativity, according to Telegraph reporter Tim Butcher. He writes that the three Christian communities in charge of maintaining the church cannot agree on restoration methods.

Textiles, Metalwork and Art from Ottoman Empire Now at Smithsonian

The weekend before Atenveldt and Gleann Abhann’s coronations, the first-ever international exhibition devoted to imperial Turkish robes, or kaftans, dating to the 16th-17th centuries, opened at the Smithsonian Institute’s Sackler Gallery.