Astrology and Astronomy

Study of the stars and planets, which in the Middle Ages was both science and philosophy

Evidence suggests Galileo may have discovered Neptune

Professor David Jamieson, Head of the School of Physics at the University of Melbourne, says examination of the notebooks of Galileo reveal that the Italian scientist probably discovered Neptune over 200 years before its officially-listed discovery date.

How Galileo changed the way we view the universe

Galileo Galilei was not the first to make a telescope, nor the first to use it to observe the heavens, but his observations of the moon and stars are widely regarded as a seminal event in the history of astronomy and religion.

Pennsic Choir Online Registration Open

Attention all choristers! You are cordially invited to join the Known World Choir at Pennsic 38, also known as the Pennsic Choir.

Medieval Astronomy from Melk Abbey on APOD

An medieval manuscript page from the notes for an astronomy lecture by Magister Wolfgang de Styria offers a glimpse at pre-Renaissance thinking in the astronomical field.

Galileo's telescope travels to th U.S.

For the first time, one of Galileo's telescopes has left Florence to be part of an exhibit in the United States. according to Derrick Pitts, chief astronomer for the Franklin Institute in Philadelphia, the 400-year-old telescope, which bears an inscription in the astronomer's handwriting, is “absolutely amazing.”

Galileo's digit part of anniversary exhibit

An exhibit honoring the 400th anniversary of Galileo's first astronomical observations will include 250 objects from the scientist's life. Included will be Galileo's right, middle finger, displayed in a crystal jar.

Bad eyesight may have affected Galileo's findings

A joint Italian and British project to test the DNA of the exhumed body of Renaissance scientist Galileo may lead to interesting findings, including the theory that vision problems affected the astronomer's work.

Italian astronomers to re-create Galileo's telescope

For the 400th anniversary of Galileo's creation of his telescope, a group of Italian scientists will recreate "the kind of telescope and conditions that led to Galileo’s world-changing observations."

Experts theorize Tycho Brahe may have been murdered

For centuries experts believed that Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe died from a "twisted" bladder, but recent studies have shown a high concentration of mercury in the astronomer's hair, leading to the theory that Brahe was murdered. Now a "group of conservators, chemists and physicians" wants to open the grave and find out the truth: was Tycho Brahe murdered, and "who done it?"

Tycho Brahe's supernova spotted again

Max Planck Institute scientists report that they have once again glimpsed echoes of a supernova chronicled in 1572 by Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe. The event was bright enough to be visible during the day. (photos and video)

Remains of Copernicus found in Warsaw

Scientists believe they have found the skeleton of the 16th century Polish astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus. The identification was made using DNA from hair retrieved from the astronomer's books. (photo)

Was the telescope invented in Spain?

An article for the magazine History Today claims that the telescope may have been invented in Spain by a Burgundian spectacle maker named Juan Roget, rather than in the Netherlands or Italy, as previously believed.

12th century Byzantine still found in Bulgaria

Bulgarian archaeologist Prof Nikolay Ovcharov has discovered a 12th century still believed to have been used in the study of alchemy in the remains of a Byzantine mansion near the village of Tatul, Bulgaria.

Dons in space!

Richard Garriott, known in the Kingdom of Ansteorra as Don Shamino, will become the next space tourist when he blasts off in the fall of 2008 aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft for a 10-day stay on the International Space Station.

Canterbury Astrolabe Quadrant bought by British Museum

The British Museum recently raised UK£350,000 to buy a rare 14th century astrolabe discovered in Kent, England in 2005. The Canterbury Astrolabe Quadrant is one of only eight such instruments in the world. (photo)

Date of Roman invasion of Britain recalculated

Professors Donald W. Olson and Russell Doescher of Texas State University, along with some of their students, used subtle astronomical clues to recalculate the date of Caesar's invasion of Britain. Their findings have been published in the August 2008 Sky & Telescope magazine.

Astronomers confirm Tycho Brahe's supernova

New telescopes have allowed modern scientists to observe light echoes of the same supernova that Tycho Brahe described 436 years ago. "Last month, the ability of modern telescopes to observe these faint and fleeting light echoes is a kind of time machine. It reveals what happened in an old supernova explosion when the opportunity for direct observation seems long gone."

Rune calendar website

Looking for an interesting A&S project, fan of Nordic studies - or just seeking an interesting way to track time - then visit the Gangleri website for an article on Rune Calendars.

Foxley Manor: A 14th Century Journal

Online journal of 14th century interests and their re-creation.

Arthur C. Clarke Dies

Famed science fiction author Arthur C. Clarke has died on March 18 at a hospital in Colombo, Sri Lanka, at the age of 90. Best-known for his work 2001: A Space Odyssey, his work on communications satellites also helped change the world.

"Copernicus' Secret" brings scientist to life

Up until now, little has been known about the personal life of medieval astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus, but author Jack Repcheck brings life to the man in his new book Copernicus' Secret: How the Scientific Revolution Began. Owen Gingerich reviews the book for the Sunday New York Times.

Peter the Rock Passes Away in Atenveldt

Author and scientist Peter L. Manly, known in the SCA as Lord Peter of Barony Atenveldt (or Peter the Rock, Peter of House Staghold), passed away at the VA Hospital in Phoenix, Arizona on July, 27, 2007, just shy of his 62nd birthday.

Galileo's Gazing

description:
The Canton of Stowe-on-the-Wowld and the Barony of Rowany are pleased to present Galileo's Gazing (aka The Stargazing Event)

*When: From 0930 ,Saturday 13th of October to 10am Sunday 14th.
*Where:
Glenworth Valley Horse Riding Centre http://www.glenworth.com.au/find-glenworth.html
Peats Ridge, NSW, Australia.
Lattitude 33°24'10.70"S Longitutde 151°11'35.17 Location:
Canton of Stowe-on-the-Wowld and the Barony of Rowany (Peats Ridge, New South Wales, Australia)

"Astonishingly modern" technology marks 14th century Indian observatory

Scientists working at the 14th-century Pir Ghaib Observatory in Delhi, India were astonished to find instruments used to tell time and study the celestial skies including a "zenith tube" through which the moon could be observed.

14th century astrolabe brings record price

A rare 14th century astrolade quadrant has been auctioned off to an anonymous bidder for UK£138,000. The instrument was crafted of brass in 1388 and was used "for telling time, mapping the stars and taking measurements."

14th century astrolabe to be auctioned

A 14th century astrolabe quadrant, discovered beneath the clay floors of a 17th century building in Kent, England, has been listed for auction March 21, 2007 with hopes to bring between UK£60,000 and UK£100,000.

Scientists at last understand ancient calculating device

After many years of study, scientists at last can fathom the works of a calculating device from ancient Greece, which some researchers consider more valuable than the Mona Lisa due to its unique historical value.

Cosmologists Find Truth in Medieval World View

In The View from the Center of the Universe, Joel R. Primack and Nancy Ellen Abrams point out the similarities between ancient beliefs about a terracentric universe and recent discoveries about the results of the Big Bang.

Today in the Middle Ages: July 13, 1527

John Dee, scholar, mystic, and astrologer to Queen Elizabeth I, was born on July 13, 1527.

"Tropical Stonehenge" Found in Amazon Rainforest

Scientists have uncovered a ring of stones in the Amazon jungle near Sao Paulo, Brazil, that they are calling the "Tropical Stonehenge."