Roman

Classical Roman culture

"Significant" Roman find in Caistor, England

Archaeologists excavating a derelict pub in Caistor, England say they have a "significant" find with the discovery of a 4th century Roman cemetery containing over forty bodies. Orientation and lack of grave goods leads experts to believe the burials were Christian.

Dry weather reveals Roman history in Great Britain

The dry summer of 2010 in Great Britain has been a help to archaeologists as it revealed hundreds of archaeological sites through "cropmarks," the landscape markings prodcued by crops growing over buried buildings.

Roman lantern found in England

An intact Roman lantern has been found in a farm field in Sudbury, Suffolk, England. The lantern is made of bronze and dates to between the 1st and 3rd centuy CE.

Roman industrial estate found in North Yorkshire

Archaeologists working on a dig in North Yorkshire, England have discovered a Roman industrial estate believed to have been used by the Ninth Hispanic legion.

A Python goes to gladiator school

Terry Jones, of Monty Python fame, takes on the persona of Roman gladiator to learn about training from the experts. (video)

Roman governor's villa fit for an emperor

When it was built in the 2nd century, Lullingstone villa was the height of luxury for its owner, Publius Helvius Pertinax, a former Roman Emperor and Governor of Britain. Now the site is one of the best examples of Roman villas in the country. (photos)

Archeological goldmine found during Sofia subway build

The construction of a new metro line in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria, has unearthed some marvels including major sections of Serdica, the Roman city and vacation site for Constantine the Great.

Time Team hopes to find Boudica's hometown

Archaeologists, including a team from Channel 4's Time Team, are set to sift through layers of history in search of evidence linking the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, near Norwich, England, to the settlement of East Anglia's Iceni queen Boudica.

New finds at Caerleon "totally unexpected"

Students learning to use geophysical equipment have discovered several large buildings at the Roman fortress of Caerleon in south Wales. Cardiff University's Peter Guest said the find was "totally unexpected."

Romans wore socks with sandals

Fibers found on a rusty sandal nail suggest that Romans were wearing socks under their sandals. The sandal was discovered in a dig in North Yorkshire, England.

Major Roman road found in south-eastern Serbia

An eight meter wide, stone block road, dating to the first century, has been discovered near the town of Dimitrovgrad, Serbia. Archaeologists believe the road was part of the Via Militaris, a major Roman military road.

Infant remains may indicate Roman brothel

Archaeologists working on the excavation of a Roman villa in the Thames Valley of England are looking for an explanation for a mass burial of 97 infants, all having died soon after birth. Experts believe the site may have been a brothel.

"Funny signal" leads to one of Britain's largest Roman coin hoards

Archaeologists are marveling over the discovery of "one of the largest ever finds of Roman coins in Britain." Over 52,000 3rd centruy coins were found by hobbyist Dave Crisp buried a foot below the surface of a field near Frome in Somerset, England.

What the Romans (and Greeks) can do for us

Latin teacher and blogger Denis Ambrose, Jr. is often asked to justify his existence to people who think "high school is nothing more than preparation for college, and college is nothing more than job training." He has compiled a list of five pragmatic reasons to study classics.

No proof Jesus killed on cross, says Christian scholar

The word translated from New Testament Greek as "crucifixion" may more accurately mean something like "suspension," says Gunnar Samuelsson, a Swedish theologian and researcher who describes himself as a "boring pastor."

World Joust/Festival of History

Festival of History: Featuring period camps ranging from Rome to the Renaissance, costumed interpreters bring history to life at the Festival of History! Visitors are guaranteed an action packed weekend as history is revisited before their eyes!

Cornish find redraws map of Roman Britain

Roman artifacts have been discovered at a fortress in Cornwall formerly believed to be an exclusively Iron Age site. This find revises the historical view of the Roman occupation of Britain, which had been thought not to extend so far southwest.

Carlisle dig provides a "wonderful glimpse into how people lived 2,000 years ago"

Carlisle Castle, one of the most important archaeological digs in northern England, has now been completed, providing experts with a wealth of archaeological evidence to study including armor, leather, pottery, and everyday household items.

Gladiator Graveyard

Archaelogists, working at the Driffield Terrace site in York have unearthed some 80 skeletons dating from the 1st through 4th centuries CE.  Based on current evidence, they believe it to be a Gladiator graveyard from the Roman settlement of Eboracum.

Medici collection sculpture to be sold

An antiquity once owned by Lorenzo de Medici will go on sale at Sotheby's June 11. 'Il Magnifico' laid claim to Three Satrys Fighting a Serpent shortly after its excavation in 1489.

Thousand-page report reveals treasures of Carlisle Roman excavation

A decade later later, the report of the 1999 "Millennuim Dig" at Carlisle describes the tens of thousands of items found at the site. Finds of wooden buildings and leather artifacts surprised the archaeologists, as such materials don't normally survive.

Roman altar stones give insight into religious practices

Archaeologists in Scotland are excited about the discovery of Roman altar stones found in a cricket pavilion in Musselburgh, East Lothian, finding them "the most significant find of their kind in the past 100 years."

Millennium Dig report documents 80,000 Carlisle artifacts

The city of Carlisle, England is now being mentioned in the same breath as York and Newcastle when it comes to Roman archaeology thanks to the Millennium dig. The three-year effort has now been documented in a 936-page report.

Colosseum display brings Roman arena to life

Ancient gladitorial artifacts, preserved at Pompeii, will share display space with modern reconstructions of plumed helmets and silk tunics for a new exhibit at Rome's Colosseum entitled Gladiatores now through October 2, 2010.

Students choose gladiator life

This summer, twenty students from the University of Regensburg in Germany are foregoing their usual pizza and computers in favor of Roman gladiator training.

Early medieval church and graves stops construction in Bulgaria

The discovery of an early medieval church and graves dating to the 5th-12th centuries, has temporarily stopped construction of a subway line in Sofia, Bulgaria.

Keep Off the Wall

Walkers along Hadrian's Wall are being urged to respect the ancient structure and help to protect it.

Why the Classics Still Matter

"What good does it do the reader to know that before battle the Romans often consulted a pullarius, a chicken-feeding augur? Such texts say nothing about modern life, critics say....But that's precisely the point."

Campaign to save Colchester's Roman Circus a success

Officials from the Colchester (England) Archaeological Trust report that they have reached their goal of raising UK£200,000to buy and preserve the only Roman chariot-racing circus ever found in Britain.

Feature-length "Rome" in the works

Bruno Heller, creator of the hit TV series Rome, has announced plans for a feature-length film.