Roman

Classical Roman culture

Ancient Londinium revealed in London park

The remains of the "busy metropolis of Londinium" may lie beneath half a meter of the Duke of Northumberland's Syon Park, the proposed site of a lixury hotel. The Roman landscape was discovered by archaeologists before hotel construction began.

Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilizations online

A team of Harvard undergraduates, graduate students, research scholars and one professor have created the Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilizations, a mapping and spatial analysis of the Roman and medieval worlds using the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) information system.

Roman soldier tweets hopes and fears for school kids

If they had had them, the Romans would have used them -- cell phones, that is. Now a group of British schoolchildren will have the chance to follow the "hopes, fears and experiences of a fictional 26-year-old Roman soldier called Marcus" on Twitter.

Headless gladiator mystery continues

Archaeologists are still debating the meaning of the burial of 46 decapitated men in a Roman cemetery in northern England. The remains, most of which originiated from far-flung localities, were buried with honor in a prestigious cemetery.

History of spectacles

Corrective lenses have a long history. Glasses filled with water and gems were used by Romans in the 1st century, while the Chinese developed spectacles in the 13th. In an article for the Telegraph, Victoria Ward looks at the history of eyeglasses.

"Impressive" Roman finds hold up clinic construction in Scotland

Residents of Musselburgh, Scotland may have to wait a little longer for their health care while city officials and archaeologists decide how to proceed with the excavation of "human remains, the bones of horses and weapons and culinary tools" dating to the Roman era.

Trees threaten Roman wall in St. Albans

Sycamore trees are the culprits in damage done to the historic Roman wall in St. Albans, England. Built in the 3rd century, the wall is what remains of a five metres high and three metres wide wall, circling the city, with a walkway on top. (photo)

Shortage of raw glass forces recycling in Roman Britain

Glass was a common commodity in Roman Britain until the 3rd and 4th centuries C.E. when a shortage of raw glass forced recycling. A new study of Roman clear glass appears in the Journal of Archaeological Science.

California students compete in Red Bull Chariot Races

Togaed students packed San Diego streets recently to compete in the San Diego Red Bull Chariot Races. Teams of three "gladiators" dragged chariots "through a tricky course filled with turns, roundabouts and sprints."

Berryfield Mosaic removal and conservation underway

"The main trouble is getting it through the door," said Nick Barnfield, project conservator with Cliveden Conservation, about the removal of the Berryfield mosaic at Colchester Castle, once the dining room floor of a 2nd century Roman townhouse.

2nd century Roman waterwheel found in Cumbria

A team of volunteer archaeologists has discovered a rare Roman waterwheel dating to the first or second century C.E. near Cockermouth, an ancient market town in Cumbria, England. (photos)

24 August 410: "the 9/11 of the ancient world"

On August 24, 410, Imperial Rome was sacked by an invading force of Visigoths from northern Europe, an event that has been compared with September 11, 2001 in the United States.

"Rare and exquisite" Roman lantern found in England

21-year-old metal detectorist Danny Mills delighted local archaeologists when he discovered an extremely rare 1st - 3rd century Roman lantern near Sudbury, England. The bronze lantern is believed to be the only one of its kind in Britain. (photo)

Gaius Appuleius Diocles best paid athlete ever

The astronomical sponsorship deals amassed by modern athletes are dwarfed by prize money earned by an illiterate Roman charioteer named Gaius Appuleius Diocles, according to University of Pennsylvania classical studies professor Peter Struck.

Roman helmet expected to bring large sum in Christie's auction

Bidders, get your checkbooks ready... A late first century Roman helmet is scheduled to be auctioned October 7, 2010 by Christie's Auction House. Predicted cost: US$242,000 to $363,000. (photo)

Analysis of pills gives insight into Roman medicine

A geneticist has analyzed some Roman pills found in a shipwreck off Italy 20 years ago. The pills date to the 2nd century BCE and were found inside a wooden medical kit.

Roman armor found in Wales

A complete suit of armor has been found at the Roman fortress of Caerleon in southern Wales. The armor was found on what is believed to be the top floor of a warehouse.

"Significant" Roman find in Caistor, England

Archaeologists excavating a derelict pub in Caistor, England say they have a "significant" find with the discovery of a 4th century Roman cemetery containing over forty bodies. Orientation and lack of grave goods leads experts to believe the burials were Christian.

Dry weather reveals Roman history in Great Britain

The dry summer of 2010 in Great Britain has been a help to archaeologists as it revealed hundreds of archaeological sites through "cropmarks," the landscape markings prodcued by crops growing over buried buildings.

Roman lantern found in England

An intact Roman lantern has been found in a farm field in Sudbury, Suffolk, England. The lantern is made of bronze and dates to between the 1st and 3rd centuy CE.

Roman industrial estate found in North Yorkshire

Archaeologists working on a dig in North Yorkshire, England have discovered a Roman industrial estate believed to have been used by the Ninth Hispanic legion.

A Python goes to gladiator school

Terry Jones, of Monty Python fame, takes on the persona of Roman gladiator to learn about training from the experts. (video)

Roman governor's villa fit for an emperor

When it was built in the 2nd century, Lullingstone villa was the height of luxury for its owner, Publius Helvius Pertinax, a former Roman Emperor and Governor of Britain. Now the site is one of the best examples of Roman villas in the country. (photos)

Archeological goldmine found during Sofia subway build

The construction of a new metro line in Sofia, the capital of Bulgaria, has unearthed some marvels including major sections of Serdica, the Roman city and vacation site for Constantine the Great.

Time Team hopes to find Boudica's hometown

Archaeologists, including a team from Channel 4's Time Team, are set to sift through layers of history in search of evidence linking the Roman town of Venta Icenorum, near Norwich, England, to the settlement of East Anglia's Iceni queen Boudica.

New finds at Caerleon "totally unexpected"

Students learning to use geophysical equipment have discovered several large buildings at the Roman fortress of Caerleon in south Wales. Cardiff University's Peter Guest said the find was "totally unexpected."

Romans wore socks with sandals

Fibers found on a rusty sandal nail suggest that Romans were wearing socks under their sandals. The sandal was discovered in a dig in North Yorkshire, England.

Major Roman road found in south-eastern Serbia

An eight meter wide, stone block road, dating to the first century, has been discovered near the town of Dimitrovgrad, Serbia. Archaeologists believe the road was part of the Via Militaris, a major Roman military road.

Infant remains may indicate Roman brothel

Archaeologists working on the excavation of a Roman villa in the Thames Valley of England are looking for an explanation for a mass burial of 97 infants, all having died soon after birth. Experts believe the site may have been a brothel.

"Funny signal" leads to one of Britain's largest Roman coin hoards

Archaeologists are marveling over the discovery of "one of the largest ever finds of Roman coins in Britain." Over 52,000 3rd centruy coins were found by hobbyist Dave Crisp buried a foot below the surface of a field near Frome in Somerset, England.