Roman

Classical Roman culture

"Roman Town" allows children to experience archaeology through a computer game

Suzi Wilczynski knows what it is like to work on a dig in the hot Israeli sun. Now she has used her experience to create an adventure computer game aimed at children which allows them to learn about the Romans and the life of an archaeologist.

Late Roman shield patterns online

On his Ancient Military History Site Luke Ueda-Sarson provides links to a wealth of information on ancient Roman and Greek military subjects including section "Late Roman Shield Patterns taken from the Notitia Dignitatum."

Conquering armies brought climate change

Genghis Khan may have inadvertantly brought about climate change, believes Julia Pongratz, who, with her colleagues Ken Caldeira of the Carnegie Institution and colleagues at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Germany, have compared historical records with global carbon dioxide levels.

African soldier chose retirement in Stratford

Sometime in the 4th century, an Roman soldier of African descent picked Stratford-upon-Avon as a place to retire. The soldier's remains were discovered in 2009.

New film set to spark interest in Hadrian's Wall

The mystery of Rome's "lost legion" has mystified historians for centuries. Now a new young-adult film, along with a redesigned Roman museum, may revive interest in Hadrian's Wall.

Illinois college students to explore "day-to-day life in the Roman courtyside"

A team of Knox College (Galesburg, Illinois) professors and their students will spend the summer studying Tall Dhiban, an archeological site near the modern town of Dhiban in west-central Jordan.

“Shanty town” excavation answers questions about late Roman Britain

Archaeological excavation by a team from the University of Durham in Bowes, England has given reasearchers new insight into civilian life around a Roman fort near the end of the Roman era. The vicus, or “shanty town,” would have survived longer than a military installation.

Romans: coming to a screen near you

Hollywood seems to have a new love affair with Rome, gladiators and soldiers in particular, with the release of The Eagle at theaters and shows such as Spartacus: Gods of the Arena on television. Cary Darling of McClatchy Newspapers has the story.

Colosseum to be restored by shoe manufacturer

Roman officials have accepted an offer from Diego Della Valle, founder of Tod's luxury shoe brand, to fund the restoration of the crumbling Colosseum.

3rd century bathhouses prove Roman social advancement in Syria

The discovery of several luxurious Roman bathhouses in Bosra, Syria demonstrates that the area was an important part of Roman social life in the area, according to Director of Bosra Antiquities Department Wafaa al-Audi.

Roman bones found under Jersey church

Contractors working on an extension to a church in Jersey, UK, were surprised to discover human remains during excavation. They were doubly surprised to learn that the remains are from Roman residents of the island.

Hadrian’s Wall trench intended as road

Archaeologist Geoff Carter has proposed a controversial new theory concerning the trench that runs south of Hadrian's Wall: It was intended to be a Roman road, linking the forts that were part of the wall complex.

Do-it-yourself Roman villa on Channel 4

A new series on Great Britain's Channel 4 challenges modern builders to construct a Roman villa using only period tools and materials. The series, Rome Wasn't Built in a Day, begins on Channel 4 on January 20, 2011 at 9pm. (photos)

6th century mosaics lead to discovery of Roman city

Sometimes crime does pay, at least when it comes to archaeological discoveries. An illegal 2007 excavation of a home in southeast Turkey has revealed the Roman-era city of Germenicia. (photo)

Roman farm found in Suffolk

Archaeologists working on the site of a new school in Lowestoft, England, believe they have discovered the remains of a 1st century Roman farm where a family of 12 might have lived.

Artifacts prove Welsh city's importance in Roman society

This Christmas, locals and visitors to Aberystwyth, Wales will be treated to a display of 4th century Roman artifacts at the Ceredigion Museum. The pieces were most likely owned by a wealthy landowner.

Equestrian statues come to life in Rome

Michelanglo's statue of Marcus Aurelius, sculpted in the 1530s, features a horse with "a strong build, a broad chest, thick manes and tails, and robust legs," the same characteristics of modern Maremmano horses, believed to have descended from the emperors' mounts.

Objets d'Art documented at the Art Institute of Chicago

In October 2010, Rohesia Anven of Thessalonica, from the Kingdom of Atlantia, visited the Art Institute of Chicago and documented many of the museum's period objects in an amazing collection of photographs. Her album is available on Picasaweb.

Vivat to HG Alaric of Bangor, Drachenwald's newest companion of the Laurel

At Yule Ball in the first week of December, their Majesties Ulfr and Caoimhe called their noble Order of the Laurel to attend them, and seek out the next suitable candidate to be invited to vigil.

Chinese settlement may show evidence of lost Roman army.

In the 1990's, archaeologists were surprised to discover evidence of early western settlers in a remote town in China's Yongchang County on the edge of the Gobi desert, including a Roman style fort and nearby residents with blonde hair and green eyes.

Ancient Londinium revealed in London park

The remains of the "busy metropolis of Londinium" may lie beneath half a meter of the Duke of Northumberland's Syon Park, the proposed site of a lixury hotel. The Roman landscape was discovered by archaeologists before hotel construction began.

Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilizations online

A team of Harvard undergraduates, graduate students, research scholars and one professor have created the Digital Atlas of Roman and Medieval Civilizations, a mapping and spatial analysis of the Roman and medieval worlds using the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) information system.

Roman soldier tweets hopes and fears for school kids

If they had had them, the Romans would have used them -- cell phones, that is. Now a group of British schoolchildren will have the chance to follow the "hopes, fears and experiences of a fictional 26-year-old Roman soldier called Marcus" on Twitter.

Headless gladiator mystery continues

Archaeologists are still debating the meaning of the burial of 46 decapitated men in a Roman cemetery in northern England. The remains, most of which originiated from far-flung localities, were buried with honor in a prestigious cemetery.

History of spectacles

Corrective lenses have a long history. Glasses filled with water and gems were used by Romans in the 1st century, while the Chinese developed spectacles in the 13th. In an article for the Telegraph, Victoria Ward looks at the history of eyeglasses.

"Impressive" Roman finds hold up clinic construction in Scotland

Residents of Musselburgh, Scotland may have to wait a little longer for their health care while city officials and archaeologists decide how to proceed with the excavation of "human remains, the bones of horses and weapons and culinary tools" dating to the Roman era.

Trees threaten Roman wall in St. Albans

Sycamore trees are the culprits in damage done to the historic Roman wall in St. Albans, England. Built in the 3rd century, the wall is what remains of a five metres high and three metres wide wall, circling the city, with a walkway on top. (photo)

Shortage of raw glass forces recycling in Roman Britain

Glass was a common commodity in Roman Britain until the 3rd and 4th centuries C.E. when a shortage of raw glass forced recycling. A new study of Roman clear glass appears in the Journal of Archaeological Science.

California students compete in Red Bull Chariot Races

Togaed students packed San Diego streets recently to compete in the San Diego Red Bull Chariot Races. Teams of three "gladiators" dragged chariots "through a tricky course filled with turns, roundabouts and sprints."

Berryfield Mosaic removal and conservation underway

"The main trouble is getting it through the door," said Nick Barnfield, project conservator with Cliveden Conservation, about the removal of the Berryfield mosaic at Colchester Castle, once the dining room floor of a 2nd century Roman townhouse.