Roman

Classical Roman culture

Capitoline Wolf created in the Middle Ages?

One of the most famous symbols of Rome is the Capitoline Wolf, a bronze statue depicting a mother wolf suckling Romulus and Remus. But now experts believe the statue was created during the Middle Ages, with parts as late as the 15th century.

Highway excavation produces ancient treasures in Romania

The excavation for a new highway in Romania has unearthed a plethora of artifacts - from Greek and Roman coins to a Celtic miniature chariot. Archaeologists have taken control of the site with the goal to preserve the artifacts for the country.

Channel Islands' Roman fort "probably the best in Britain"

Archaeologists working on the oldest standing building in the Channel Islands, a small Roman fort, are pondering the possible decision to turn the building into a visitor center.

Unearthed Roman road changes historians' maps

The patrons of the Stockwell Arms, in Colchester, England, probably never dreamed that they were having a pint atop the remains of a 1st century Roman road. The road was revealed recently after reconstruction of the pub.

Sicily's Roman mosaics return to public view

The 4th century Roman mosaics at the Villa del Casale at the Piazza Armerina in Sicily are considered “the finest in situ in the Roman world.” Now the newly-restored stone tiles are again open to the public. (photo)

Large Roman cemetery found in Norfolk

Excavations for a housing development in Great Ellingham, Norfolk, England have uncovered a large cemetery dating to Roman times. The 85 graves are thought to belong to a rural settlement.

Roman Brits enjoyed a "refined diet"

Ongoing excavations at the Silchester Roman Town in Hampshire, England show that Roman citizens in the area seasoned their food with spices imported from the Mediterranean, and enjoyed foods such as olives, celery and dill, native to warmer climes.

Sexaginta Prista to receive facelift

The Roman heritage of the Balkans is about to get a boost with an EU-funded renovation project of the Roman fortress Sexaginta Prista near the city of Ruse, Bulgaria.

Whitehall Roman Villa dig completed

In 1996, archaeologists began the investigation of Whitehall Farm in Northamptonshire, England, and were pleased to find coins and pottery buried beneath the farmland. Now, in 2012, the Whitehall Farm Roman Villa and Landscape Project has been completed. (photo)

Roman dig to showcase "level of history" in Ewell, England

Archaeologists believe that there had been continuous occupation of the area around Ewell Village in England since the 4th Century. Now a three-week dig hopes to uncover evidence of a Roman settlement along the road which ran from Chichester to London. (video)

Master Ark's jewelry web site

Master Ark has been creating authentic Medieval jewelry for over 25 years.  His cloak clasps, pennanular brooches, fibulas, Thor's hammers, brooches, and pendants are worn throughout the Known World. 

4th century synagogue vandalized in Israel

Israel Antiquities Authority deputy director Uzi Dahari reports that vandals, possibly ultra-Orthodox Jews, have damaged a rare 5th century mosaic in a synagogue in the northern Israeli city of Tiberias.

1000 years in Sicily: from Roman villa to monastery

For over 1,000 years, a farmland estate in the northeastern Sicilian village of Torrenova was in constant use, according to archaeologists from the University of Vienna. The land is believed to have hosted a Roman villa in late antiquity and a monastery throughout the Middle Ages. (photo)

Roman beads found in 5th century Japanese tomb

A recent discovery may prove that the Roman Empire was more influential than previously believed. Three Roman glass beads have been unearthed in a 5th century Utsukushi burial mound in Nagaoka, Japan. (photo)

The Dark Ages: Everything old is new again

In a new documentary, filmmaker and historian Michael Wood compares the economic gloom and social unrest of modern Europe with conditions in the western world at the beginning of the Dark Ages.

Stunning locations mark Morrocan Roman ruins

Most tourists of Roman sites rave about the beauty of Rome or Hadrian's Wall, but most ignore Roman Morocco. In an article for The Star Online, Paul Schemm looks at several Roman sites in Morocco.

Japanese tomb yields Roman jewelery

Glass beads found in a 5th century tomb near Kyoto, Japan probably originated somewhere in the Roman empire. The beads were made between the 4th and 1st centuries CE.

Rome on the Rhine

If you believe the press, most important Roman activity took place in either Italy or Britain, but archaeologists and historians know a different story, as evidenced by the treasures of the Roman-Germanic Museum in Cologne, Germany. Deutsche Welle has a review. (photos)

Roman temple discovered in Bonn, Germany

The remains of a 2,000-year-old Roman temple were recently discovered by archaeology students on the campus of Bonn University in Germany.

Evidence of smuggling found in Roman shipwreck

Italian archaeologists have recently excavated a 3rd century Roman shipwreck off the coast of Marausa Lido, a beach resort near Trapani. On board they found eveidence of smuggling in the form of unusual tubular tiles, taken from North Africa to Rome. (photo)

Holy Robe shines spotlight on Trier

In 1500, the Holy Robe, believed by Catholics to have been worn by Jesus, was installed as a relic in the ancient Catholic cathedral in Trier, Germany, once the Roman capital north of the Alps. Since then, the robe has been exhibited only 17 times, and is currently on display until May 13, 2012.

Cirencester's Roman amphitheatre to be revamped

The Cirencester town council has plans for their city's Roman ruins, including "the remains of one of the largest Roman amphitheatres in Britain."

Archaeologists hope to find Roman suburb in Northampton

Archaeologists in Northampton, England are set to excavate a site that may reveal 1,000 years of local history, from the Iron Age through the end of the Roman period. They believe the site might have been a suburb of the Roman city of Duston.

Roman ornaments found in Sozopol, Bulgaria

Excavations by Bulgarian archeologists Dimitar Nedev and Tsonya Drajeva have unearthed Roman artifacts including a "massive gold ring and a gold leaf from a royal crown" at the site of the ancient city of Apollonia, now Sozopol.

Travel the Roman roads, Google-style

The Roman road network, renowned for its scope and efficiency, has now gotten even easier to travel thanks to an online application from Stanford University.  ORBIS is a geospatial network model that covers hundreds of land and sea routes in the Roman Empire circa 200 CE.

UK£49,200 Heritage Lottery Fund grant may bring fame to Epiacum

Many travelers to England are familiar with the country's famous Roman forts, but Elaine Edgar is hoping that a UK£49,200 Heritage Lottery Fund grant will help bring fame and visitors to a lesser-known site, Epiacum.

In Northumberland, moles assist in archaeology

In Northumberland, England, volunteers are sifting through mole hills looking for artifacts from Epiacum, a Roman fort 12 miles south of Hadrian's wall.

Gladiators banned from Colosseum

Performers dressed as gladiators will no longer be able to make money having their photos taken with tourists, according to city officials. NPR commentator Renee Montagne has the brief audio report for Morning Edition.

Redeeming qualities of Attila the Hun

On the blog Past Imperfect for the online version of Smithsonian Magazine, Michael D. Blodgett tries to find "Nice Things to Say About Attila the Hun." The greatest, he feels was Attila's "refusal to be seduced by wealth."

Latin through the eyes of a gladiator

Marcia Ross of ORR High School in southeastern Massachusetts has found a unique way to teach elementary school age children Latin. She frames the after-school enrichment program as "Latin through the eyes of a gladiator."