Roman

Classical Roman culture

Roman cemetery at Glevum excavated

Experts from Cotswold Archaeology have discovered a number of new burials in what they believe was the cemetery for the Roman city of Glevum, now Gloucester. "This is probably one of the most significant finds that has been made within Gloucester within the last 30 years. It will add greatly to the knowledge of the [city]," said archaeologists Stuart Joyce.

Latin alive and well in the cyber world

Latin, formerly known as the "dead language," seems to be alive and kicking in the digital age, according to a recent article in the Economist. Five words can often say more than ten English ones, notes David Butterfield, a Latinist at the University of Cambridge, making the language ideal for Twitter.

Roman wall discovered in Plovdiv, Bulgaria

Archaeologists from the Archaeological Museum in Plovdiv, Bulgaria have discovered the remains of a 5th century Roman wall near the regional broadcasting centre of Bulgarian National Radio and Bulgarian National Television.

Lincoln Castle may hide Roman townhouse

The Lincolnshire County Council is sponsoring the restoration of Lincoln Castle in England. So far, archaeologists have found the remains of the Norman foundations of the castle and a previously-unknown Anglo-Saxon church. They expect to reach the Roman era soon in which they expect to find a Roman townhouse.

Welsh site spans Roman and medieval periods

The time between when the Romans left Britain and the medieval period began has usually been considered a dark age lacking in civilization, but a new archaeological discovery in Caernarfon, Wales may help to fill in the gaps.

Elizabeth Greene shares an "Academic Minute" on Roman shoes

A recent "Academic Minute" from WAMC, Northeast Public Radio, features Dr. Elizabeth Greene of Western University in London, Canada, on the topic of Roman shoes, and what they can tell us about the lives of people in Roman Britain.

Amazing Roman concrete

2,000 years after it was installed, some Roman concrete is still holding strong. Why? That is the question that an international team of experts has answered through the study of the Pozzuoli Bay breakwater, at the northern tip of the Bay of Naples. The History Channel (History.com) has the story.

Fort search hopes to change perception of Romans in Scotland

"People are always surprised when I tell them about the Roman occupation of the area - they think the Romans never got any further than the Antonine Wall or even Hadrian's Wall which simply isn't true," said Dr Birgitta Hoffmann who leads an effort to discover a "lost" Roman fort in Scotland.

Haverhill research center to be built over Roman farm

Archaeologists working on what will become the Haverhill Research Park have discovered artifacts ranging from the Iron Age to the 19th century on the site. The science research complex will be constructed on what was once a 2nd century Roman farm.

New Leicester parking lot discovery

It's been quite a year for Leicester archaeologists. First there was the discovery of Richard III under a parking lot. Now a 3rd century Roman cemetery has been found under a second lot. The cemetery includes 13 burials -- both Christian and Pagan, an unusual practice at the time.

Swear like a Roman

Facility in swearing is either an admirable or a deplorable ability, but all can agree that it is a trait with a long history. In her new book, Holy Sh*t! A Brief History of Swearing, Melissa Mohr outlines the history of the practice with emphasis on Roman times. Olga Khazan of the Atlantic has a review. PG-13.

Volunteers join experts to uncover Roman road in Wales

For three days, residents of Abergwyngregyn, Wales worked alongside archaeologists to uncover a portion of a Roman road, which once ran from Caerhun to Segontium. The road runs near the home of 13th century Welsh prince Llywelyn the Great and his grandson, the first Prince of Wales. (photo)

More on the art of Roman hair fashion

Baltimore hairdresser, and self-proclaimed "hairdo archaeologist," Janet Stephens, discusses her unique work with Roman hairstyles with the BBC while on a recent visit to London. (video)

London's "lost stream" yields treasures.

Beneath the streets of London runs a river of gold - not actual gold and not actually a river, but archaeological gold in the form of the "lost" Walbrook River. Dubbed "the Pompeii of the north," the thick layer of mud has been a treasure trove of Roman artifacts, from a gladiator’s amber amulet to entire buildings. (photos and video)

"Romans Revealed" project allows children to "dig" into diversity of Roman Britain

A new interactive website, aimed at children, has been launched by the Runnymede Trust and archaeologists from the University of Reading. The site focusses on the diversity of Roman Britain by allowing children to learn about Roman residents such as the ‘Ivory Bangle Lady,’ a "high status young woman of North African descent who remains were buried in Roman York."

Scottish "wall" built fifty years before Hadrian's

BBC History Magazine reports that archaeologists have identified a first century Roman defense system that extended 120 miles across Scotland. The series of forts, watchtowers and defensive ditches predates Hadrian's Wall by 50 years, and the Antonine Wall by 20. (photos and map)

Public encouraged to participate in Navenby dig

The recent discovery of what is believed to be a Roman dwelling, dating to the 3rd or 4th century, in Navenby, Lincolnshire, England, offers an opportunity to the public to participate in a real archaeological dig. Work on the site is being sponsored by the Heritage Lottery Fund and will continue until September.

Archaeologists hope to find Roman fort in Midlands flood zone

After serious flooding, the Environment Agency in England is studying plans to build flood defences along the River Derwent near Derby in the Midlands, but before that work begins, archaeologists are being given access to an area known to be the site of a Roman fort.

Construction workers find Bath's Roman wall

Archaeologists are excited by the discovery of part of the 4th century Roman wall in England's city of Bath. The discovery was made during sewer repairs to Burton Street.

Tolkien inspiration on display in Hampshire

Eight years before J.R.R. Tolkien published The Hobbit, archaeologist Sir Mortimer Wheeler sought the author's opinion about a cursed Roman ring discovered in Silchester, Hampshire in the 1920's. The ring, along with a tablet, cursing any thief who thought to steal it, are believed to have inspired Tolkien's One Ring.

Roman baths found in Bulgaria

The Bulgarian resort town of Sozopol, on the Black Sea, has long attracted visitors wanting to relax. Now the discovery of a large stone thermae building shows that the attraction may stretch back to Roman times. (photo)

LIDAR may reveal camp of Hadrian's Wall builders

The study of a series of old LIDAR (light detection and ranging) aerial photos has led to the discovery of what may be a camp of the men who constructed Hadrian's Wall. The find could change the way historians view civilian life in Roman Britain.

Roman fare at Vindolanda

British chef John Crouch is an expert on Roman cookery. Recently he shared his knowledge with visitors to the Roman Army Museum at Vindolanda, along Hadrian's Wall, through a series of events that allowed participants to "sample a taste for themselves of the Roman diet."

Does Sudeley Castle conceal Roman ruins?

The recent discovery of a Roman column and the discovery last year of a stone relief of Roman god Cunomaglos have archaeologists calling for an investigation of Sudeley Castle in Winchcombe, England. Experts believe the castle may conceal a temple and a villa.

The Roman hairstyle debate continues

According to the article On Pins and Needles: Stylist Turns Ancient Hairdo Debate on Its Head, Janet Stephens is a hairdo archaeologist. She has recreated Roman hairstyles, and in the article, she discusses her research - and her critics.

London excavation yields wealth of Roman artifacts

Excavations at the former site of the Temple of Mithras in London, England have yielded over 10,000 artifacts, many in a remarkable state of preservation. The finds include a shoe, jewelery, documents, and table wares.

Portrait of a wealthy Roman

After nearly 2000 years, a wealthy Roman citizen whose remains were discovered 18 years ago in Caerleon, near Newport, Wales, has a face. (portrait)

Roman skeleton contains calcified ovarian tumor

Scientists from the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona in Spain are studying the remains of a 5th century Roman woman found buried in a Roman cemetery in the archaeological site of La Fogonussa. The woman, aged 30 to 40 years, had suffered from an ovarian tumor.

Castra Aestiva

Imagine yourself as part of a heavily armoured column of Roman soldiers marching slowly and rhythmically along a narrow forest road. Small clouds of dust are kicked up by your heels. The sun beats mercilessly down on you in-between the shadows, and the humming sound of cicadas rattles off of your helmet.

Roman "industrial complex" found in Wales

"We have a remarkably well-preserved Roman road in good condition and the site is throwing up all manner of interesting things including a lot of lead, which suggests it was connected with the lead workings on Halkyn Mountain," said Will Walker, of Earthworks Archaeology about the discovery of a Roman site near Flint, Wales.