Roman

Classical Roman culture

Scottish "wall" built fifty years before Hadrian's

BBC History Magazine reports that archaeologists have identified a first century Roman defense system that extended 120 miles across Scotland. The series of forts, watchtowers and defensive ditches predates Hadrian's Wall by 50 years, and the Antonine Wall by 20. (photos and map)

Public encouraged to participate in Navenby dig

The recent discovery of what is believed to be a Roman dwelling, dating to the 3rd or 4th century, in Navenby, Lincolnshire, England, offers an opportunity to the public to participate in a real archaeological dig. Work on the site is being sponsored by the Heritage Lottery Fund and will continue until September.

Archaeologists hope to find Roman fort in Midlands flood zone

After serious flooding, the Environment Agency in England is studying plans to build flood defences along the River Derwent near Derby in the Midlands, but before that work begins, archaeologists are being given access to an area known to be the site of a Roman fort.

Construction workers find Bath's Roman wall

Archaeologists are excited by the discovery of part of the 4th century Roman wall in England's city of Bath. The discovery was made during sewer repairs to Burton Street.

Tolkien inspiration on display in Hampshire

Eight years before J.R.R. Tolkien published The Hobbit, archaeologist Sir Mortimer Wheeler sought the author's opinion about a cursed Roman ring discovered in Silchester, Hampshire in the 1920's. The ring, along with a tablet, cursing any thief who thought to steal it, are believed to have inspired Tolkien's One Ring.

Roman baths found in Bulgaria

The Bulgarian resort town of Sozopol, on the Black Sea, has long attracted visitors wanting to relax. Now the discovery of a large stone thermae building shows that the attraction may stretch back to Roman times. (photo)

LIDAR may reveal camp of Hadrian's Wall builders

The study of a series of old LIDAR (light detection and ranging) aerial photos has led to the discovery of what may be a camp of the men who constructed Hadrian's Wall. The find could change the way historians view civilian life in Roman Britain.

Roman fare at Vindolanda

British chef John Crouch is an expert on Roman cookery. Recently he shared his knowledge with visitors to the Roman Army Museum at Vindolanda, along Hadrian's Wall, through a series of events that allowed participants to "sample a taste for themselves of the Roman diet."

Does Sudeley Castle conceal Roman ruins?

The recent discovery of a Roman column and the discovery last year of a stone relief of Roman god Cunomaglos have archaeologists calling for an investigation of Sudeley Castle in Winchcombe, England. Experts believe the castle may conceal a temple and a villa.

The Roman hairstyle debate continues

According to the article On Pins and Needles: Stylist Turns Ancient Hairdo Debate on Its Head, Janet Stephens is a hairdo archaeologist. She has recreated Roman hairstyles, and in the article, she discusses her research - and her critics.

London excavation yields wealth of Roman artifacts

Excavations at the former site of the Temple of Mithras in London, England have yielded over 10,000 artifacts, many in a remarkable state of preservation. The finds include a shoe, jewelery, documents, and table wares.

Portrait of a wealthy Roman

After nearly 2000 years, a wealthy Roman citizen whose remains were discovered 18 years ago in Caerleon, near Newport, Wales, has a face. (portrait)

Roman skeleton contains calcified ovarian tumor

Scientists from the Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona in Spain are studying the remains of a 5th century Roman woman found buried in a Roman cemetery in the archaeological site of La Fogonussa. The woman, aged 30 to 40 years, had suffered from an ovarian tumor.

Castra Aestiva

Imagine yourself as part of a heavily armoured column of Roman soldiers marching slowly and rhythmically along a narrow forest road. Small clouds of dust are kicked up by your heels. The sun beats mercilessly down on you in-between the shadows, and the humming sound of cicadas rattles off of your helmet.

Roman "industrial complex" found in Wales

"We have a remarkably well-preserved Roman road in good condition and the site is throwing up all manner of interesting things including a lot of lead, which suggests it was connected with the lead workings on Halkyn Mountain," said Will Walker, of Earthworks Archaeology about the discovery of a Roman site near Flint, Wales.

Historical Glassworks- glassblowing

Historical Glassworks creates handblown glass articles, specializing in historical reproductions. Available items include tools, feast gear, accessories, and decorative gifts. They also offer live demonstrations. View their calendar for a list of upcoming events in your area.

Latin: Dead or alive?

The announcement of the new Pope in Rome has led some journalists to ponder if Latin really is a dead language. The Guardian's Style Blog jumps into the discussion.

Wool fleece helps date Christian church

A tiny scrap of wool fleece, found in a grave, has helped to date an early Christian church in Maryport, Cumbria, England. The wool, which dated to the 3rd or 4th century CE, showed that a structure, accompanied by Christian burials, was probably a Christian church from the late Roman period.

The truth about Hadrian's Wall

All may not have been sweetness and light between the Romans and the local inhabitants during the time of the building of Hadrian's Wall in northern England. A new study suggests that the absence of settlements and artifacts proves that the Romans ejected the locals from the area of the wall.

Hadrian’s Wall trail faces erosion challenge

Hadrian's Wall faces a new challenge: waterlogged trails that are causing grass and soil erosion along the trail. Natural England has awarded the Hadrian’s Wall Trust UK£50,000 for drain repair, but visitors can also help.

Lost in the bath

Researchers might often wonder what went on in Roman baths, and now archaeologist Alissa Whitmore believes she may have some answers. For some time, Whitmore has studied objects discovered in the drains of Roman bathhouses, and has presented her findings at the annual meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America in Seattle.

Economic crisis may have caused "hacked up" Roman silver

In 1919, archaeologists discovered a hoard of Roman silver at Traprain Law in East Lothian, Scotland composed of piles of "hacked up" Roman silver. They believed the late Roman period treasure was brought to Scotland as loot, but a new study by Dr Fraser Hunter shows that economics may have been the cause of the destruction of the dinnerware. (photo)

Roman bricks and cat prints bring mystery to Fort Vancouver

A grad student visiting Fort Vancouver, Washington (USA) in 1982 noticed some bricks at the fort that didn't look like the others. Analysis later revealed that these bricks were made in Roman England.

DNA study shows lasting Roman gift to Britain

Early in the 5th century, the Romans departed from Britain, leaving behind roads, artifacts, walls, and something else. A new DNA study shows that up to 4 million British men carry Italian genetics, and of that, one million probably originate with the Romans.

[AET] Tournament of the Windmill II - POSTPONED

Hail, citizens! The gates of the Temple of Janus stand open, heralding the coming war! The Barony of Delftwood invites one and all to join us in preparation for the great conflict. There will be tournaments, melees, populace activities, and an A&S display, all centered on this year's theme of Ancient Rome.

Shoes of Roman children correct myth about military life

Professor Elizabeth Greene looks at shoes differently than most people. At the recent 2013 Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America, she presented research on how Roman children's shoes reflected their family status, especially in military familities.

Hairstyle of the Vestal Virgins

Slightly out-of-period, but interesting nonetheless, is an instruction video by hairdresser Janet Stephens re-creating the hairstyle of the Vestal Virgins of ancient Rome. The Seni Crines is the oldest known hairstyle in Rome, and influenced later styles.

Pope tweets

Ancient meets modern when Pope Benedict XVI tweeked his first message last month - in Latin. Since that time, the Pope has amassed 2.5 million followers.

Retire in beautiful Lincoln!

The city of Lincoln, England has been a Roman outpost since the first century. Situated on the trade route between London and York, the area was first a fortress town and later a colonia, a retirement settlement for soldiers who wished to stay in Britain.

Gaming Piece or Roman Toilet Paper?

Think your toilet paper is rough? Try these! Formerly thought to be broken Roman "gaming pieces", these round ceramic  discs are now believed to be the equivalent of a roll of toilet paper.