Roman

Classical Roman culture

Roman Numerals: For SCAdians - and Football Fans!

The subject of Roman numberals seems to crop up every year: in January for football fans and in May for members of the SCA. This year the Olympic Games complicate an already mystifying system.

Forensic research reveals gladiators fought by the rules

Despite the Roman arena's well-deserved reputation for gladiatorial brutality, forensic examination of the remains of several dozen gladiators found in Turkey reveals that their combat was fought with well-defined rules of engagement.

Roman Cohort in Tennessee

Chris Koogle of the Knoxville, Tennessee Daily Beacon spent a day learning about the Roman First Cohort with Robert Wear, a Roman re-enactor who has been studying the Romans since high school.

Stairway, Sphinx Found at Hadrian's Villa

A monumental staircase and marble statue of a sphinx have been discovered in the Gymnasium area of Hadrian's Villa in Tivoli, north of Rome. The statue is believed to have originated in Egypt.

Roman Mosaics Depict Jewish Life

An exhibit of Roman floor mosaics at the Brooklyn Museum of Art in New York gives insight into Jewish life around the Mediterranean in the late Roman period. Depicting scenes and symbols from Judaism, some mosaics also included Latin inscriptions.

Valentine's Day: Love in the Classic Style

In celebration of Valentine's Day, Hamilton College Classics Professor Barbara Gold offers opinions on modern versus classical love.

Roman Villa Discovery Thanks to Moles

Archaeologists are crediting moles with the discovery of a Roman villa in the British Cotswold area when their digging unearthed mosaic tiles.

Scotland, China or Rome? Who Invented Golf?

Recent research has suggested that the Chinese played a form of golf in the 10th century. Now archaeologists claim that paganica, a Roman version of golf, existed as early as 30 B.C.E.

The Legacy of St. Augustine

In a speech delivered to the American Enterprise Institute, Robert Louis Wilken of the University of Virginia, looks at the legacy of Augustine, thinker and writer.

Roman Lattice-work panties and Coa Vestis in progress

This thread explores the creation and wearing of the filmy Coa Vestis, and Roman Lattice-work panties.

Hopefully, this helps to prove that Roman garb wasn't meant to be made from old bedsheets or broadcloth; the site attempts to bring awareness to the fact that Roman garb can be quite sensual and interesting, when done right, researched properly, and worn with dignity.

Just because Roman garb is generally easy to make does not mean it's easy to wear! (The Greeks, after all, had slaves that attended to the sole function of properly draping the master's clothing.)

Were Roman Builders Influenced by Great Wall?

Visy Zsolt, a professor of Archaeology at the University of Pecs in Hungary, believes that the construction of the Roman Limes may have been influenced by the Great Wall of China.

Wine Snobbery: Blame it on the Romans

Tom Standage of the Herald Tribune looks at wine snobbery through the ages beginning with the Romans.

Roman Road Used Throughout Medieval Period

Archaeologists working on a section of Roman road in Wiltshire, England have found horseshoes and conclude that the road was in use in the medieval period.

Skimpy Civvy Adorns G-String Gladiator

Divers working on a river site near a Roman fortress in England have discovered a bit of pottery depicting the rear portions of a g-string clad gladiator.

A Very PC Holiday!

Diane Roberts of NPR's Weekend Edition offered a very politically correct holiday greeting on Sunday, December 18, 2005 with a look at the winter holiday season, ancient Roman style.

Women Important in Roman Military Life

Archaeological evidence from Roman forts shows that women held an important place in Roman military life.

Roman Remedies

During this fly season, James Le Fanu of the Telegraph takes a look at Roman medicinal remedies, including some from the Materia Medica by Pedanius Dioscorides.

Roman Calçada Road Found in Portugal

A small stretch of Roman road has been discovered near Tavira, Portugal by historian Luís Fraga da Silva. The road originally connected the cities of Ossónoba and Balsa to Pax Júlia and dates to the 2nd century C.E.

Crumbling Roman Walls May Affect Italian Tourism

The collapse of a wall in the ancient Forum in Rome has travelers concerned for their safety. The incident happened at the time when the Italian government is considering cuts to cultural programs.

Walking Roman Scotland

The current online issue of Walkwise, Scotland's walking magazine, features a list of walking excursions that explore Roman sites in Scotland.

Cardinals Ask Pope to Save Latin

Latin has fallen into such disuse in the Roman Catholic Church that many of the church fathers no longer understand the language. Now members of the College of Cardinals have asked Pope Benedict XVI to make Latin the "universal language" by using it at international events.

Life in Roman Scotland

Judy Vickers of the Scotsman looks at the Roman legacy in Scotland and how they influenced life north of Hadrian's Wall.

Moroccan City Holds Secrets from Roman Through Medieval Times

Moroccan archaeologists from the National Institute of Archaeological Sciences and Heritage are combing through research discovered during a recent excavation of the Roman city of Thamusida and its medieval layers up to Islamic times.

Was Britain Rome's Treasure House?

Ancient Britain seems to have been the treasure trove for Rome since thousands of gold and silver artifacts dating to Roman times have been found there. Now a Welsh archaeologist thinks he knows why.

Hannibal v. Rome

On Sunday October 30, 2005, the National Geographic Channel will present Hannibal v Rome a two-hour epic story of "an African warrior who would dare to challenge the impossible and shape the course of human history."

Brading Roman Villa Yields "Amazing Finds"

Archaeologist Kevin Trott is excited about recent excavations at Brading Roman Villa on England's Isle of Wight. His 400-page report dispells long-held myths and may "take the archaeological world by storm."

Claterna Emerges from the Italian Soil

After being buried for 1500 years, the Roman town of Claterna, bear Bologna, Italy, has begun to emerge from the soil. Excavations have already revealed patrician houses, metalworking sites and mosaic paving, as well as pottery and coins.

Kilts from Togas?

What did the Romans do for Scotland? Allan Burnett looks at the Roman legacy in the country from the Battle of Mons Graupius to the 3rd century, including an observation that the idea for the kilt may have come from the Roman toga.

Italian Programmer "Googles" Roman Villa

History met science recently when an Italian computer programmer discovered what he believes is the ruins of a Roman villa by studying a map found on "Google Earth."

Chalk it up: Giant Medieval Hillside Figure

Dame Aoife offers a bevy of links about large chalk carvings, of which the virility-gifted Cerne Abbas Giant is the most famous, that decorate the hills of England.