Roman

Classical Roman culture

Curse Tablet Expands Knowledge of Roman Britain

Archaelogists from the University of Leicester have found a fragment of lead that greatly adds to their knowledge of the city's Roman past. The "curse tablet" bears a list of 18 names; until now, only a few names of Roman residents of the city were known.

"Explore Roman Britain" Online

The University of Oxford (England) has announced that an online, continuing education program entitled Exploring Roman Britain is now accepting students.

Roman Coins Offered to Placate the Gods?

Archaeologists working near the city of Cuijk in the Netherlands have discovered a cache of 3rd century Roman coins and other treasures, apparently as an offering at the spot where a bolt of lightning had struck.

Political Ads of Ancient Rome

"The mid-term campaigns have offered up perhaps the most venomous volleys of political advertising in U.S. history....Yet as Americans ponder how much of it is true and how much pure vindictive blather, we might note that we're rather backward compared to the pointed, frank and refreshingly honest political ads of the Romans more than 1,900 years ago."

Mosaics Highlight Roman Villa Discovery

Archaeologists have discovered "evidence of a substantial Roman villa with a mosaic floor in the main room" in the Quantock Hills of Somerset, England. The site is one of the most westerly Roman villas yet found in England.

Castra Romana: Pompeii, The Day Before Vesuvius

On February 2-4, 2007, Vesuvius will errupt all over again...well, almost. Castra Romana-Pompeii, a Roman Era Re-enactment, will hold an event recreating the day before the catastrophic events of August 24, 79 C.E.

Rome -- the Eternal Source Material

An entertaining new essay by Allan Massie explores the continuing fascination of Rome for fiction writers and moviemakers -- and their audiences.

4th Century Roman Coins Spill Out in Kent

A hoard of over 3,000 late Roman coins "made a sound like tinkling glass" when they poured from an overturned pot recently unearthed by archaeologists on a dig in Kent, England. The treasure is valued at over UK£10,000.

Nano-Grecian Formula One?

New research by French scientists seems to suggest that the techniques used by Greeks and Romans to dye their hair had results in common with today's nanotechnology and were comparable to modern products.

What the Romans Did to Wales

British interest in Rome, especially in how it affected Britain, is on the increase with the broadcast of Ancient Rome - The Rise and Fall of an Empire on BBC1. An article on IC Wales discusses Roman/Welsh history.

War 2, Archaeology 0

Recent bombing and a resulting oil spill in Lebanon have damaged two World Heritage sites, says an inspection team from UNESCO. Roman remains at Tyre and a medieval tower at Byblos are in urgent need of repair.

Roman Villa Discovered in Turkey

A 3rd century Roman villa has been discovered in the ancient city of Laodiceia near Denizli, Turkey. Archaeologists believe the home, which contains mosaic floors, may have belonged to a rich farmer.

Latin to Become Lingua Europa?

L’Osservatore Romano, the official newspaper of the Vatican, is calling for Latin to become the official language of the European Union. The article comes in the wake of a move by Finland's president to promote the use of the language as "potentially contemporary."

"Totally Unique" Roman Bathhouse Discovered in Kent, England

Archaeologists working on a Roman dig in Kent, England are enthusiastic about the remains of a 5th century Roman bath, calling it "totally unique" for the county.

Roman Ink

An unlikely exhibition exploring the history of tattoos in Britain has opened at Newcastle University's Museum of Antiquities. The exhibition includes archaeological evidence of military tattoos among the Roman soldiers at Hadrian's Wall.

CSI Needed for Roman Crime?

An archaeological team working near Sedgeford,England may need the help of criminal investigators to solve a 1500-year-old mystery: was the skeleton found pushed into the oven of a Roman farm murdered?

Roman Village Found Near Bonn, Germany

Archaeologists working near Bonn, Germany have found the remains of a Roman village complete with baths.

Today in the Middle Ages: August 24, 410 C.E.

On August 24, 410, King Alaric the Goth sacked Rome. This event is sometimes regarded as the beginning of the Middle Ages.

Recreating Roman Cosmetics

A Roman reenactor and museum manager gave a demonstration of Roman cosmetics at a Roman "military spectacular" in Wales earlier this month.

Roman Road to Nowhere

Peddars Way near Thetford in west Norfolk, England, was built by the Romans 2,000 years ago and appears to lead nowhere. Archaeologists are now searching for clues to a destination, such as a fort, which would make construction of the road logical.

All the News That's Fit to Print - in Latin!

For several days when Finland took over Presidency of the European Union, publishers of the EU website had decided to post the latest news — in Latin. At least one of the days' posts is still available.

Latin for Beginners

The British Archives has posted a tutorial for those who want to learn Latin. Latin 1086 – 1733: a practical online tutorial for beginners uses early documents to demonstrate how Latin was used and to teach the basics.

Dorset Kitchen Renovation Unearths Roman Floor

Restaurant owner Luciano Tombolani discovered much more than he bargained for when he authorized the renovation of a kitchen for his Italian restaurant: a mosaic Roman floor.

Welsh Field Holds Roman Treasure

A hoard of over 2,000 Roman coins of the late period has been discovered in a Welsh field. The treasure was found a mere 12 inches below the surface.

Vita vinum est (Wine is Life)

Romans loved their wine, loved talking about it — and writing about it. An article for CentreDaily.com focuses on the history and sources for study of Roman wine.

Rare Exmoor ponies to help save dwindling peat bog

Ponies from an endangered breed, descended from the original British "hill ponies," are being brought into a nature preserve on the Solway Plain in England, to graze away grasses that threaten one of the area's few remaining peat bogs.

Today in the Middle Ages: June 19, 325

The Emperor Constantine convened the first Council of Nicea on June 19, 325.

Summer Collegia III

description:
The Incipient Shire of Drakenmere, sponsored by the Barony of Bryn Madoc, Proudly Presents Summer Collegia III
Venimus   •   Vidimus   •   Fundimus

Put on your tunica, toga and sandals and join us on August 19, 2006 for a fun day of classes, fighting and food!  Your day will begin with our breakfast Traveler's fare and end with the Roman Auctionarius Dapifer (table server auction), Acroama (live entertainment) and a delightful summer Roman feast prepared by Mistress Derbail. Children's activities will be provided. For Roman garb links, click here. Location:
Incipient Shire of Drakenmere (Waynesboro, Georgia)

Lest London Fall

The stone which legend says was placed in London by Brutus the Trojan has a new protector: Chris Cheek, the manager of a sporting goods shop.

Boudicca's Burial Site Found?

Archaeologists are pondering whether or not a burial site discovered near a McDonald's restaurant in Birmingham, England may be that of warrior queen Boudicca.