Roman

Classical Roman culture

Skeleton found in Trafalgar Square

Skeletal remains discovered recently in London's Trafalgar Square have not triggered the British equivalent of CSI. The remains are of a wealthy Roman man who was buried in the 5th century beneath what is now the busy city center.

Life of luxury in Roman forts

Recent excavations of a Roman fort on Tyneside have revealed that some centurions led a life of relative luxury with indoor plumbing, painted walls and comfortable furniture.

Star Wars mythology finds roots in ancient Greek and Roman tales

Carl Rubino, a classic professor at Hamilton College, feels that classical themes are the basis for the popular Star Wars movies, a concept he explains in an upcoming History Channel documentary Star Wars: Legacy.

Earliest dental prosthesis found in Roman grave

Archaeologists have discovered in the grave of an unidentified Roman woman a gold wire used to hold together a set of artificial teeth. The dental prosthesis is believed to be the earliest such device ever discovered.

The story of a flea

In a review for The Guardian, Ian Pindar discusses a new book about bubonic plague: Justinian's Flea by William Rosen, an "impressive study of the bubonic plague and its impact on history."

Understanding of "distant past" key to modern civilization

Tom Holland, author of Rubicon and Persian Fire defends classical education in an article for Britain's The Guardian. Holland feels the study of the Greeks and Romans is necessary to understand modern democracy.

4th century Roman remains discovered in Croatia

Roman remains and artifacts were discovered recently in Vinkovci during excavations to construct a new sports hall including a fibula, a Roman ornamental clip, dating to the 4th century C.E.

Gladiators' graveyard discovered

Scientists believe they have, for the first time, identified an ancient graveyard for gladiators. Analysis of the remains, found in Ephesus (in present-day Turkey), gives new insight into how they lived, fought, and died.

Lincoln aqueduct was functional Roman water source

Archaeologists working on the Lincoln aqueduct in England now believe that underground water source was actually used by the Romans. For centuries it was believed that the aqueduct was built but never used by the Romans.

Roman fort destroyed by modern construction team

The Daily Express reports that the Roman fort at Caister, near Yarmouth, England, along with hundreds of artifacts, was destroyed when permission was given for builders to excavate on an archaeological site.

Roman house found in Cotswold gravel pit

A 4th century Roman home has been discovered during excavation of a gravel pit near Stow-onthe-Wold, England. The house is believed to have been the "big farm house" of a Roman settlement.

Proper Latin pronunciation

In an article for Great Britain's The Oldie, Peter Jones "gets to the Bottom of How Julius Caesar really spoke", to the ire of some traditionalists.

Study claims "dead languages" detrimental to modern language learning

A recent "secret report" by the Dearing Languages Review in Great Britain warns that the study of ancient languages may be detrimental to the study of modern languages because they "contribute nothing to 'intercultural understanding'."

Ready, set go: starting gates from Colchester's Roman Circus found

Twelve starting gates from the Roman Circus at Colchester, England have been discovered by archaeologists who have been working on the site since 2004. The gates operated like "greyhound traps, unleashing the charioteers on to the quarter-mile long opening stretch of the track."

Roman village discovered in Wiltshire

Silbury Hill in Wiltshire, England may contain more than a Neolithic mound. It may also be the site of a first century Roman village. "English Heritage geophysicist Dr Neil Linford said: 'We are really excited by this discovery because we had no idea that a Roman village of such a size lay this close to Silbury Hill.'"

Drinking songs for the Roman "Apres Slaying Party"

What if...after the Roman senators had killed Julius Caesar on the Ides of March, they had a blow-out party, complete with Roman drinking songs? Robert Krulwich speculated on NPR's March 15, 2007 Morning Edition program.

View of ancient Britons changed by discovery of Roman coin

The discovery of a 2nd century BCE coin in Cornwall may change how pre-Roman Britons are viewed. The pre-Roman Republic silver coin proves that active trading took place with the inhabitants of Britain before Rome conquered the island.

Oertha Summer Coronet

description:
On July 20-22, Prince Cyrus and Princess Caitríona invite you to journey to the Shire of Hrafnafjordr where we will await the outcome of the Coronet List for the determination of Their Heirs. In honor of His Highness, it will be a Roman-themed Coronet. The chosen site is a secluded lakeside setting with much room for pageantry both large and small. Bring your banners, your Roman 'bling' and your imaginations! Location:
Shire of Hrafnafjordr (Kenai, Alaska)

Roman burial ground a surprise for Lincolnshire archaeologists

Water company workers in Lincolnshire, England were surprised recently to uncover a very large Roman cemetery dating to the 1st century CE. So far the graves have yielded artifacts as well as 30 skeletons.

Wastelands 2007

description:
Wastelands: A Journey to Constantinople

June 22-24, 2007

As long, sunny days and warm nights herald in the summer months, we invite you to travel with us. Our destination is the heart of the Eastern Roman Empire, the jewel of Byzantium, the glorious city of Constantinople.

So don your traveling clothes and spend the first weekend of summer with friends, fighting, feasting and fun! Location:
Elchenburg Castle, Barony of Sacred Stone, Atlantia

York grave holds Roman murder victim

Archaeologists working on a large Roman cemetery in York, England have discovered, among the remains of wealthy and poor alike, the bones of a murder victim. "She was stabbed seven times in the throat from the front," said Osteo-archaeologist Malin Holst.

Spend a day in Pompeii

From June 27, 2007 until January 6, 2008, visitors to the Science Museum of Minnesota are invited to spend "A Day in Pompeii." The exhibit extolls "the rich culture, spirituality, and day-to-day customs of the people of ancient Pompeii."

Emperor Hadrian slept here!

Producers of the BBC's Timewatch program are hoping to prove that the Roman emperor Hadrian once stayed near his stone creation. This summer, archaeologists will dig along Hadrian's Wall looking for evidence of why the wall was built and where the Emperor might have stayed.

Roman army knife

One of the artifacts at the Fitzwilliam Museum is a Roman army knife dating to the 3rd or 4th century. Unlike modern Swiss army knives, this one appears to have been used mainly as an eating utensil.

Rome: Upstairs Downstairs with swords!

In an article for Newsweek, Malcolm Jones looks at the second season of the HBO series Rome.

Volunteers needed for Pompei summer project

Archaeologists working for the Pompeii Food and Drink Project are looking for volunteers to work on the site in June and July 2007. The work will consist of documenting storage buildings and organizing the massive amount of information collected.

Thousands of historical treasures found in German mud

Constructions workers in Cologne, Germany have discovered a 3rd century stone tablet dedicated to the god Jupiter. The tablet is just one of over 10,000 artifacts unearthed from the construction site.

Son of Fool's Revel

description:
Look out! It's the Gauls! They are taking over Fool's Revel. Yes, it's all things Gaulish at the Revel this year. Time for a bit of Roman bashing and feasting on wild boar. There'll be the magic potion / super power Tourney for the fighters; a Worst Bard contest during feast; and in the spirit of looking for new Heralds, your Baronial Herald is sponsoring a Contest! Isabel de la Haye will bring a "ceremony" that will read by contestants COLD. Points will be awarded for Best Pronouncement (what you say) – Best Inflection (how you say it) – Best Projection (how well you make it heard) – and how enjoyable you make your spiel! Other contests include: Asterix & Obelix Jeopardy! (Brush up on your Gaulish facts and trivia!) And the A&S competition: best small box (under 12") in any mode. Location:
Selveirgard (Chugiak, Alaska)

Roman military road found in the Netherlands

Dutch archaeologists have uncovered what they believe to be a Roman limes, a military road used to patrol against the onslaught of Germanic tribes.

Palatine Hill excavation in Rome yields artifacts from deposed Emperor

The Emperor Maxentius was defeated by Constantine I in a battle in the year 321 C.E., but his followers apparently concealed his scepter, ceremonial weapons, and other regalia from Constantine's forces by burying the items. Archaeologists excavating Palatine Hill in Rome have located the cache, which is notable for the condition of the objects.