Roman

Classical Roman culture

From banker to warrior: the transformation of Sergio Iacomoni

What makes an Italian banker decide to gird his lions and become a Roman gladiator? "One day, we were talking. We had played enough tennis, worked out with enough sports. So we decided: OK, now we'll be gladiators," said Sergio Iacomoni, who now calls himself Nerone.

Did smallpox kill Gloucester Romans?

Experts working on the recently-discovered mass Roman grave in Gloucester, England will be using DNA tests to determine what killed over 90 individuals. A first look at the remains points to a 2nd century smallpox outbreak that swept across Britain.

Nero's gate discovered in Cologne

Constructions workers at the site of Cologne, Germany's new metro line have discovered a Roman gate believed to have been built by the Emperor Nero and dating from the 1st century C.E.

[ATE] Brymstonne Bacchanal

description:
The College of Brymstonne once again cordially invites one and all to don their togas, find their fibulas, tie-on their chitons and join us for a day of revelry, games, food, and fun!!

The menu for Bacchanal will continue in the grand Brymstonne tradition of a truelly stellar feast created by Lady Kateryn Treningham!!

Feast Steward: Lady Kateryn Treningham email: ktsmom@qwest.net Location:
College of Brymstonne (Tempe, Arizona)

Roman statues receive makeover at Bath

A collection of statues that ring the Roman baths in Bath, England have received a facelift to remove years of grime. The renovation project is just part of a plan to "create an unforgettable experience for all our daytime and evening visitors."

3rd century amulet places Jews in Austria

A gold amulet dating to the 3rd century CE inscribed with a Jewish prayer has been discovered in the grave of a Roman child in Halbturn, Austria proving that people of the Jewish faith inhabited the country at the time.

Latin hip-hop highlights Festival of the Classics

"Odi et amo. Quare id faciam, fortasse requiris/ Nescio, sed fieri sentio et excrucior" ("I hate and I love. Why do I do it, perchance you might ask? I don't know, but I feel it happening to me and I'm burning up.") sings Ista, a German rap group that uses Latin verse in its performances.

Ancient Colchester South Gate discovered

Archaeologists believe that they have discovered part of the South gate of the Roman wall at Colchester, Britain's oldest Roman town. The wall was destroyed in 1818.

Partum vita mottos in Latin

Latin phrases have traditionally been used for family mottos. Now everyone can have their own Latin motto by using In Rebus, an online motto creator.

Onager Catapult Kits

Onager offers replicas of ancient catapults as used by the Romans and other cultures up until the medieval period. These are fully functional wooden kits. Makes a great display piece, science project or gift for anyone with an interest in history, engineering or physics.

Discovered Roman settlement will not stop modern cemetery plans

The recent discovery of a Roman settlement near Lincoln, England, will not hold up plans for the creation of a modern cemetery. Archaeologists believe that the settlement dates from between the 2nd and 4th centuries.

Ancient Roman lighthouse discovered

Turkish archaeologists found a 2,000 year old lighthouse at the ancient Roman port of Patara. Built in the time of the Emperor Nero, it may be the oldest such structure that remains intact.

Medieval documents help locate Roman fort

Archaeologists working on the excavation of a Roman fort near Calstock in Cornwall credit references to silver smelting in medieval documents for helping to locate the site.

"Send me socks and underpants!"

According to archaeologist Robin Birley, the researcher's life can be pretty bleak until he finds the really big discovery, in this case, letters from Roman soldiers. Harry Mount of the Daily Mail has the story.

"As time goes by" Roman style

Just in time for Valentine's Day, Professor Judith Hallett of the University of Maryland, looks at how love was expressed in ancient Rome.

Rowing through Europe - Roman style

A YouTube video clip takes a look at the Navis Lusoria, a reconstruction of a late Roman period boat. (narration in German)

Museum offers virtual tour of Roman road

A new exhibit at the Museum of the Diocletian Baths in Rome lets visitors take a virtual walk down the Via Flaminia, a major travel artery which was "built in the third century B.C.E. to connect Rome to Ariminum, today's Rimini, on the Adriatic sea."

Roman bridge reconstructed in Northumberland

A 2nd century Roman bridge, which originally crossed the Tyne River in Northumberland, has been reconstructed on the river's bank. The original was one of the largest bridges in Roman Britain.

"Most significant piece of wooden furniture" found in Rome

A wooden and ivory throne, dating to the times of Julius Caesar, has been discovered in Herculaneum and is considered to be "the most significant piece of wooden furniture ever discovered there."

Emperor Valens cursed

Sometime in the 4th century, someone was REALLY cheesed off at the emperor — at least enough to curse him by defacing his image and wrapping lead around his face.

Errant Knight Jewellery

Errant Knight offers stunning hand-made authentic artefact replicas including court belts, sword and armour belts and jewelry. All items are thoroughly researched to ensure historical accuracy.

Roman glue still holds

Archaeologists are working to re-create a Roman "superglue" used to stick silver laurel leaves to legionnaires' battle helmets. Traces of the glue were discovered on iron helmets found near the German town of Xanten which were buried in river mud for more than 1500 years.

London Olympic construction uncovers Roman artifacts

The London Olympics may leave a lasting mark on the city's history. Recently, workers at the site of the new London stadium unearthed artifacts including a Roman coin dating to the 4th century.

Byzantine-era synagogue sheds light on Jewish life

Jewish scholars are having to rethink opinions about life and culture in early Byzantine times after the discovery of a 5th century synagogue, complete with elaborate mosaic floors.

"Domus del Chirurgo" sheds light on Roman medicine

For the past 17 years, archaeologists have worked at the site of the Domus del Chirurgo, the House of the Surgeon, the home of a 2nd century Roman doctor in Rimini, Italy. Among the discoveries: "the largest find of surgical instruments anywhere."

Roman barge to be salvaged in Cologne

Portions of a Roman barge, dating to as early as the 2nd century C.E., will soon be removed from its muddy resting place according to archaeologists. It may well be the "oldest Roman transport vessel left in central Europe."

Roman feast gear found in London well

A 4th century banqueting set which once belonged to a rich Roman family was discovered recently in a well during excavation in London. The set included 19 metal vessels. (photos)

Pop culture breathes life into Latin

Popular movies, movie stars, and TV series such as Harry Potter, Angelina Jolie, and Star Trek are mainly entertainment, but they also have helped keep Latin in the public eye when it otherwise would be forgotten outside academia.

Roman-era synagogue found near Sea of Galilee

The remains of a late Roman-Byzantine-era synagogue have been discovered in the Arbel National Park near the Sea of Galilee. The building is thought to date from the 2nd to 4th century C.E.

Tabula Peutingeriana, last surviving roadmap of Roman roads

Oriented east to west instead of north to south, the Tabula Peutingeriana, a seven-meter-long parchment scroll, records the network of roads of the late Roman Empire. From Spain to India, the map elongates the continents and reduces the Mediterranean Sea to a squiggle, but is the earliest known map of Roman roads.