Roman

Classical Roman culture

Site of large Roman hospital found in Moravia

Once a part of a fortified complex, a Roman hospital, "described as the largest preserved site of its kind north of the Danube," has been found in South Moravia. The site dates to the 2nd century.

Roman streets uncovered in Plovdiv

Archaeologists working on a large Roman site in Plovdiv, Bulgaria have discovered two Roman-era streets and the home of a Roman nobleman.

Ventotene shipwrecks excite world of Roman archaeology

The discovery of the wrecks of five 3rd - 5th century Roman shipwrecks off the coast of the Italian island of Ventotene has excited the world of Roman-era research. "It is like an underwater museum," said one expert.

Cooking with the ancients

Looking for ideas for a new appetizers? Try a recipe from the past - way past - with The Philosopher’s Kitchen: Recipes from Ancient Greece and Rome for the Modern Cook by Francine Segan.

Arthur legends inspired by Carausius, say experts

A Roman cavalry lance head may prove that the legends of King Arthur were inspired by Roman soldiers and sailors. The contos head, dating to the 3rd century, was discovered in Norfolk County, England.

Brampton Roman artifacts to be displayed for the first time

An amazing collection of Roman artifacts discovered 50 years ago near Brampton, England, is scheduled to go on display for the first time in late 2009. (video)

4th century silver coins found near Filey, England

Bridlington Quay Detecting Society, a group of amateur treasure hunters in England, has discovered a cache of Roman coins dating to the 4th century. The coins, which have been officially declared treasure, may be purchased by the British Museum. (photo)

English crossroads site of Roman well

Archaeolgists have great hopes for a newly-discovered Roman well near Chester, England. The well, located at a crossroads, and several large rock quarries, was found during construction preparation for a Travelodge hotel.

2000 year anniversary of Battle of Teutoburg Forest to be celebrated

Tourists in western Germany who have an interest in history may want to seek out the site of the Battle of Teutoburg Forest, or Varusschlacht, as it is called in German, a 1st century epic fight between an alliance of Germanic tribes and Roman legions. The site is located near Osnabrueck.

600 Sq. Ft., 1,700 Year Roman Old Mosaic Revealed in Israel

Israeli archaeologists have uncovered for public view "one of the largest and best preserved mosaics ever found."

View Whitehall Roman bathhouse for last time

The community archaeological project at Nether Heyford in Northamptonshire, UK will face a bittersweet milestone on July 12, 2009 when the Roman bathhouse will be able to be viewed for the last time before being re-covered. While that building is being preserved for future study, others, such as the Roman villa, continue to be investigated.

Volunteers find Roman artifacts on first day of dig

An archaeological dig in Lincolnshire, England, which teams professional and volunteers, has led to satisfying results on its first day. Among items found: "Roman coins, flints and walls."

The riddle of the skulls

Archaeologists in Dorset, England are trying to uncover the mystery of a burial pit full of skulls dating to Roman times. The 45 skulls discovered so far all appear to belong to young men.

3rd century skeletons surprise pond builders

Gardeners digging a pond near Mowmacre, England were surprised to find human remains beneath their shovels. The two skeletons have been dated to 3rd century Roman Britain, and were found along with bits of pottery.

Gladiator's helmet travels to Australia

An extraordinarily-preserved gladiator's helmet, found in what is believed to be a storeroom of the gymnasium of Pompeii, will be the centerpiece of an exhibit on Roman life at the Melbourne Museum. (photos).

2nd century scandal at Vindolanda

Researchers studying the Vindolanda tablets, wooden documents detailing everyday life in Roman Britain, believe that five of the tablets show evidence of graft among public officials. (photo).

The cost of Hadrian's Wall

In today's world of astronomical construction costs, what would it cost to build Hadrian's Wall? The British company Carillion thinks it knows.

The case for studying Latin

Why study Latin? Charlotte Higgins, author of Latin Love Lessons and It's All Greek to Me makes the case in her "On Culture" blog for The Guardian.

Current Viroconium "only tip of the iceberg"

Experts from English Heritage have declared that excavations at Shropshire’s Wroxeter Roman City, Viroconium, have so far revealed "only the tip of the iceberg," and plan to uncover the rest of the city.

Vindolanda Writing Tablets to return home

Thanks to a UK£1.8m grant from regional development agency One North East, the Vindolanda Writing Tablets, the rich chronicle of Roman military in Britain, will be coming home to Vindolanda for "a rolling programme of displays" in 2012.

To see Roman France, go south

When asked the best way to view the Roman heritage of France, Patrick Périn, the director of the Musée des Antiquités Nationales replied, "Go South." That is what travel reporter Elaine Sciolino did to research her article for the New York Times. (photos)

1st century Roman palace found in Romania

Romanian archaeologists are excited about the discovery of a Roman palace, dating to the time of Emperor Trajan, in the southwestern village of Zavoi. Experts believe that the structure was built during the first Dacian-Roman War of 101-102.

Roman vicus sheds light on the last days of Roman Britain

Archaeologists working on a Roman settlement near Bowes, England have discovered a vicus, an unplanned settlement on the outskirts of the fort dating to the 2nd to 3rd centuries, which would have been home to hundreds of people.

Roman road being destroyed by 4x4s

The last remnants of a Roman road from Wandlebury to Horseheath, England are being destroyed by trail bikers and 4x4 drivers who using it as a race track.

Largest Roman coin to be auctioned

The largest known silver Roman coin, dating to the 4th century C.E., will be auctioned in late May 2009 in the United States. The coin weighs 104.30 grams.(photo)

Praise God and Pass the Tartar Sauce?

The early Christians of Rome ate a diet including much more fish than their pagan neighbors, according to a new analysis of catacomb burials.

Late Roman village discovered in Austria

The remains of a village, dating to late Roman times, have been discovered at the site of a proposed retirement home in Salzburg, Austria. Archaeologists believe it is the "largest find from that period of history in Salzburg to date."

Roman pollution reaches Iceland

A new study, which appeared in the April 2009 issue of the journal Science of the Total Environment shows that air pollution from 1st and 2nd century Roman mining and metalworking operations has shown up in an Icelandic salt marsh.

Burgundy vineyards dated to Roman times

A recent archaeological dig sponsored by the Institut National de Recherches Archéologiques Préventives and the ARTeHIS Laboratory (CNRS/Ministère de la Culture et de la Communication/Université de Bourgogne) shows that the production of burgundy wine near Dijon, France dates to Roman times.

Bulgarian and British team will study early European settlement

Archaeologists from Bulgaria and Great Britain are joining efforts to begin research in the area of the lower Danube River, concentrating on the 5th through 7th centuries. The goal of the project is to study "changes in lifestyle and social life in the transitional period from antiquity to the Middle Ages."