Roman

Classical Roman culture

4th century Roman temple found in Tuscany

A rectangular stone and marble temple, built using the opus testaceum technique, has been discovered near Marina di Alberese in central Italy. The existence of the 4th century temple may suggest a larger settlement in the area.

A feast for the orgy

In an article for Remembrance of Meals Past, Corky White remembers the time she was asked to prepare a Roman feast for a Harvard professor.

Hadrian's Wall: cultural melting pot

Research shows that the Roman guards who occupied Hadrian's Wall came from a wide range of ethnic backgrounds, from northern to eastern European. Recently, evidence has shown that a fair number came from the Middle East.

Keeping up with the Ciceros

Reasons given for the study of Latin over the year have ranged from "better understanding of English" to "looks good on a resume," but a new reason, according to Globe and Mail arts columnist Warren Clements, might be "to keep up with all the amusing Latin books that have been pouring forth for the past 60 years."

Facebook adds Latin

Hebrew? Persian? Pirate Speak? Now Latin is the latest translation to be added to Facebook's Translations application.

Roman skeleton really Goth

The 5th century skeleton of a man, discovered in 1972 in Gloucester, England, has been identified as a Goth, originating from east of the Danube River. Experts feel that the man was most likely a Roman soldier.

US Army construction site unearths Roman settlement

A team of archaeologists from Mainz University have discovered what they believe is a 3rd century Roman settlement near Wiesbaden, Germany. The site was found during excavations for a new US$133 million Army Corps of Engineers housing project.

Murder or execution in Venta Icenorum?

"This is an abnormal burial," said archaeologist Will Bowden of the University of Nottingham, about the discovery of a male skeleton, buried with his hands tied behind his back. "It could be that the person was murdered or executed, although this is still a matter of speculation." (photo)

Roman military camps found on Austrian amber road

The discovery of three Roman military camps "will rewrite the history of the Romans in Austria," said Stefan Groh, the leader of the Austrian Archeological Institute team which discovered the camps near Strebersdorf. The sites were found on the amber road, the ancient trading route which runs through the country.

Hadrian's wall cemetery to be excavated

Excavation has begun on "the first systematic excavation of a cemetery on Hadrian's Wall," a Roman cremation cemetery which is part of the World Heritage Site at Birdoswald Fort, Cumbri.

3D footprint of Colchester Circus proposed

Philip Crummy, director of the Colchester Archaeological Trust, which in 2004 discovered the location of the Colchester, England Roman Circus, reports that a proposal has been created to mark the dimensions of the site with a "three dimensional representation on the site of the circus footprint."

Festival of Ancient Heritage celebrated in Bulgaria

An international gathering of Roman re-enactors met recently in Svishtov, Bulgaria to celebrate the Festival of Ancient Heritage with re-creations of Roman military life and battles. (photo gallery)

"Presenting the Roman Frontiers – Communicating the Evidence" at Newcastle University

A group of over 300 international specialists on Roman archaeology met recently at Newcastle University to discuss Roman frontier heritage sites and how they are presented to the public.

Hadrian's Wall - a hike worth taking.

When he decided to walk the 84 miles of Hadrian's Wall across northern England, reporter Len Barcousky of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette wasn't sure what he was letting himself in for, but the experience left him feeling like a "king of the world."

Reporter searches for allure of archaeology in Clunia, Spain

According to Mark Piesing of The Guardian, volunteering on the late Roman archaeological site in Clunia, Spain leaves one feeling more like Gil Grissom than Indiana Jones, yet volunteering for digs is more popular than ever. Piesing set off to find out why.

Amateur archaeologists drawn to Vindolanda

For over 200 years, archaeologists have been digging at Vindolanda, the 3rd-4th century Roman fort in the north of England. Now volunteers can try their hand at archaeology -- and still find artifacts. (audio)

Golden Dwarf

The Golden Dwarf is a seller of quality renaissance, medieval, and pirate clothing, costumes, garb, armor, weapons, and accessories for LARP, Reenactment, Ren-Faires, and SCA.

Researchers investigate "ancient lighting"

A team of experts is investigating ancient lighting techniques to evaluate how artifacts would look in their original light. The result "is a warm, sumptuous glow, which the researchers describe as subtle and pleasant compared with the 'rough, almost unnatural' effect of modern lighting." (photo)

Wooden structure precursor of Hadrian's Wall

According to archaeologist Geoff Carter, the stone structure of Hadrian's Wall may not have been the first to cross northern England. Carter believes a wooden wall, spanning 117 km, was built first.

High-res survey reveals Roman farming community

Recent high-resolution geophysical surveys of the Roman town of Venta Icenorum in Norfolk, England, show that the town may have included agricultural areas, a discovery that contradicts earlier theories of the town's dense population. (graphic)

Site of large Roman hospital found in Moravia

Once a part of a fortified complex, a Roman hospital, "described as the largest preserved site of its kind north of the Danube," has been found in South Moravia. The site dates to the 2nd century.

Roman streets uncovered in Plovdiv

Archaeologists working on a large Roman site in Plovdiv, Bulgaria have discovered two Roman-era streets and the home of a Roman nobleman.

Ventotene shipwrecks excite world of Roman archaeology

The discovery of the wrecks of five 3rd - 5th century Roman shipwrecks off the coast of the Italian island of Ventotene has excited the world of Roman-era research. "It is like an underwater museum," said one expert.

Cooking with the ancients

Looking for ideas for a new appetizers? Try a recipe from the past - way past - with The Philosopher’s Kitchen: Recipes from Ancient Greece and Rome for the Modern Cook by Francine Segan.

Arthur legends inspired by Carausius, say experts

A Roman cavalry lance head may prove that the legends of King Arthur were inspired by Roman soldiers and sailors. The contos head, dating to the 3rd century, was discovered in Norfolk County, England.

Brampton Roman artifacts to be displayed for the first time

An amazing collection of Roman artifacts discovered 50 years ago near Brampton, England, is scheduled to go on display for the first time in late 2009. (video)

4th century silver coins found near Filey, England

Bridlington Quay Detecting Society, a group of amateur treasure hunters in England, has discovered a cache of Roman coins dating to the 4th century. The coins, which have been officially declared treasure, may be purchased by the British Museum. (photo)

English crossroads site of Roman well

Archaeolgists have great hopes for a newly-discovered Roman well near Chester, England. The well, located at a crossroads, and several large rock quarries, was found during construction preparation for a Travelodge hotel.

2000 year anniversary of Battle of Teutoburg Forest to be celebrated

Tourists in western Germany who have an interest in history may want to seek out the site of the Battle of Teutoburg Forest, or Varusschlacht, as it is called in German, a 1st century epic fight between an alliance of Germanic tribes and Roman legions. The site is located near Osnabrueck.

600 Sq. Ft., 1,700 Year Roman Old Mosaic Revealed in Israel

Israeli archaeologists have uncovered for public view "one of the largest and best preserved mosaics ever found."