Roman

Classical Roman culture

Cornish find redraws map of Roman Britain

Roman artifacts have been discovered at a fortress in Cornwall formerly believed to be an exclusively Iron Age site. This find revises the historical view of the Roman occupation of Britain, which had been thought not to extend so far southwest.

Carlisle dig provides a "wonderful glimpse into how people lived 2,000 years ago"

Carlisle Castle, one of the most important archaeological digs in northern England, has now been completed, providing experts with a wealth of archaeological evidence to study including armor, leather, pottery, and everyday household items.

Gladiator Graveyard

Archaelogists, working at the Driffield Terrace site in York have unearthed some 80 skeletons dating from the 1st through 4th centuries CE.  Based on current evidence, they believe it to be a Gladiator graveyard from the Roman settlement of Eboracum.

Medici collection sculpture to be sold

An antiquity once owned by Lorenzo de Medici will go on sale at Sotheby's June 11. 'Il Magnifico' laid claim to Three Satrys Fighting a Serpent shortly after its excavation in 1489.

Thousand-page report reveals treasures of Carlisle Roman excavation

A decade later later, the report of the 1999 "Millennuim Dig" at Carlisle describes the tens of thousands of items found at the site. Finds of wooden buildings and leather artifacts surprised the archaeologists, as such materials don't normally survive.

Roman altar stones give insight into religious practices

Archaeologists in Scotland are excited about the discovery of Roman altar stones found in a cricket pavilion in Musselburgh, East Lothian, finding them "the most significant find of their kind in the past 100 years."

Millennium Dig report documents 80,000 Carlisle artifacts

The city of Carlisle, England is now being mentioned in the same breath as York and Newcastle when it comes to Roman archaeology thanks to the Millennium dig. The three-year effort has now been documented in a 936-page report.

Colosseum display brings Roman arena to life

Ancient gladitorial artifacts, preserved at Pompeii, will share display space with modern reconstructions of plumed helmets and silk tunics for a new exhibit at Rome's Colosseum entitled Gladiatores now through October 2, 2010.

Students choose gladiator life

This summer, twenty students from the University of Regensburg in Germany are foregoing their usual pizza and computers in favor of Roman gladiator training.

Early medieval church and graves stops construction in Bulgaria

The discovery of an early medieval church and graves dating to the 5th-12th centuries, has temporarily stopped construction of a subway line in Sofia, Bulgaria.

Keep Off the Wall

Walkers along Hadrian's Wall are being urged to respect the ancient structure and help to protect it.

Why the Classics Still Matter

"What good does it do the reader to know that before battle the Romans often consulted a pullarius, a chicken-feeding augur? Such texts say nothing about modern life, critics say....But that's precisely the point."

Campaign to save Colchester's Roman Circus a success

Officials from the Colchester (England) Archaeological Trust report that they have reached their goal of raising UK£200,000to buy and preserve the only Roman chariot-racing circus ever found in Britain.

Feature-length "Rome" in the works

Bruno Heller, creator of the hit TV series Rome, has announced plans for a feature-length film.

York's "Ivory Bangle Lady" of African origin

Recent analysis of a Roman burial in the city of York show that the remains belonged to a "high status" woman of African origin. Dubbed the "Ivory Bangle Lady," the woman was buried in the late 4th century along with "items including jet and elephant ivory bracelets, earrings, beads and a blue glass jug." (photos)

Views on risk: past and present

In a recent lecture entitled "Risk and Humanities," Cambridge classicist Mary Beard explored "the images of gambling and associated brawls that appear on the walls of bars in Pompeii."

[ATE] Bacchanal

The College of Brymstonne once again cordially invites one and all to don their togas, find their fibulas, tie-on their chitons and join us for a day of revelry, games, food, and fun!

Roman temple and early medieval church found in Spain

Archaeologists working on excavations in the chancel of the Church of Sant Feliu Girona in Catalonia, Spain, have discovered the remains of a 6th or 7th century tombs, as well as an ancient Roman temple.

Gregorian Code fragments found in medieval book

Scraps of packing material in the cover of a medieval book have been identified as pieces of the 4th century Gregorian Code, a Roman law book, long believed to have been lost.

Source of Aqua Traiana discovered

British father and son filmmaking team Ted and Michael O'Neill believe they have found the source of the Aqua Traiana, the 2nd century aqueduct, constructed by the Emperor Trajan, 30-40km northwest of Rome. (photos)

Lecture series on the ancient world at University of Southern California and Getty Villa

VCAW-IMI (Visual Culture of the Ancient World & International Museum Institute at USC) will present a lecture series dealing with the ancient world in March and April 2010. The lectures will take place at USC and at the Getty Villa.

Burial a "glimpse into Sleaford's Roman past"

Recent archaeological finds in the town of Sleaford, England prove that the town "was a very large and important settlement in the Roman period." Among the discoveries were the skeleton of a 4th century woman.

Roman bones show life of "disease and hard labour"

The discovery of a Roman grave in Weston-super-Mare, England last year has given experts insight into the life of 2nd-4th century Roman inhabitants of Britain. This particular man, aged between 36 and 45,  lived a life "defined by disease and hard labour."

The dark origins of Valentine's Day

Nearly everyone celebrates Valentine's Day, but many are not familiar with the origins, some rather dark, of the holiday for lovers. Ngonidzashe Dzimiri of the Sunday Standard offers a history.

Computer technology to be used to read inscription on Roman altar

Two experts from the University of Mainz in Germany are using the latest computer technology to try to decypher the "invisible" inscription on a 3th century Roman altar. The stone was discovered in the River Tyne in 1672, but has never been legible. (video)

Pomegranate part of healthy Roman diet in England

Romans may have brought more than forts and paved roads to England during their occupation. They may have brought a healthy diet. (photo)

4th century Roman grave found in Hungary

A team of archaeologists have discovered a grave dating to the last period of Roman occupation in the northwest Hungarian province of Pannonia. The age of the grave was determined by a bone comb found in it.

When in Rome... read!

Mysteries set in ancient Rome continue to catch the imaginations of readers.

Roman city found in Libya

Italian archaeologists have discovered a buried Roman city near the city of Tobruk in Libya. Remnants of the city were found beneath sand dunes, leading experts to believe that a large part of the city sank.

Roman tower found in Chester

Archaeologists working to repair a section of Chester, England's city wall have discovered the remains of a Roman tower. “To our surprise, almost as soon as we started digging, a well-made sandstone wall appeared. It was running across the line of the City Wall and was more than 1m thick," said City Archaeologist Mike Morris.