Roman

Classical Roman culture

York's "Ivory Bangle Lady" of African origin

Recent analysis of a Roman burial in the city of York show that the remains belonged to a "high status" woman of African origin. Dubbed the "Ivory Bangle Lady," the woman was buried in the late 4th century along with "items including jet and elephant ivory bracelets, earrings, beads and a blue glass jug." (photos)

Views on risk: past and present

In a recent lecture entitled "Risk and Humanities," Cambridge classicist Mary Beard explored "the images of gambling and associated brawls that appear on the walls of bars in Pompeii."

[ATE] Bacchanal

The College of Brymstonne once again cordially invites one and all to don their togas, find their fibulas, tie-on their chitons and join us for a day of revelry, games, food, and fun!

Roman temple and early medieval church found in Spain

Archaeologists working on excavations in the chancel of the Church of Sant Feliu Girona in Catalonia, Spain, have discovered the remains of a 6th or 7th century tombs, as well as an ancient Roman temple.

Gregorian Code fragments found in medieval book

Scraps of packing material in the cover of a medieval book have been identified as pieces of the 4th century Gregorian Code, a Roman law book, long believed to have been lost.

Source of Aqua Traiana discovered

British father and son filmmaking team Ted and Michael O'Neill believe they have found the source of the Aqua Traiana, the 2nd century aqueduct, constructed by the Emperor Trajan, 30-40km northwest of Rome. (photos)

Lecture series on the ancient world at University of Southern California and Getty Villa

VCAW-IMI (Visual Culture of the Ancient World & International Museum Institute at USC) will present a lecture series dealing with the ancient world in March and April 2010. The lectures will take place at USC and at the Getty Villa.

Burial a "glimpse into Sleaford's Roman past"

Recent archaeological finds in the town of Sleaford, England prove that the town "was a very large and important settlement in the Roman period." Among the discoveries were the skeleton of a 4th century woman.

Roman bones show life of "disease and hard labour"

The discovery of a Roman grave in Weston-super-Mare, England last year has given experts insight into the life of 2nd-4th century Roman inhabitants of Britain. This particular man, aged between 36 and 45,  lived a life "defined by disease and hard labour."

The dark origins of Valentine's Day

Nearly everyone celebrates Valentine's Day, but many are not familiar with the origins, some rather dark, of the holiday for lovers. Ngonidzashe Dzimiri of the Sunday Standard offers a history.

Computer technology to be used to read inscription on Roman altar

Two experts from the University of Mainz in Germany are using the latest computer technology to try to decypher the "invisible" inscription on a 3th century Roman altar. The stone was discovered in the River Tyne in 1672, but has never been legible. (video)

Pomegranate part of healthy Roman diet in England

Romans may have brought more than forts and paved roads to England during their occupation. They may have brought a healthy diet. (photo)

4th century Roman grave found in Hungary

A team of archaeologists have discovered a grave dating to the last period of Roman occupation in the northwest Hungarian province of Pannonia. The age of the grave was determined by a bone comb found in it.

When in Rome... read!

Mysteries set in ancient Rome continue to catch the imaginations of readers.

Roman city found in Libya

Italian archaeologists have discovered a buried Roman city near the city of Tobruk in Libya. Remnants of the city were found beneath sand dunes, leading experts to believe that a large part of the city sank.

Roman tower found in Chester

Archaeologists working to repair a section of Chester, England's city wall have discovered the remains of a Roman tower. “To our surprise, almost as soon as we started digging, a well-made sandstone wall appeared. It was running across the line of the City Wall and was more than 1m thick," said City Archaeologist Mike Morris.

Latin students create wiki for the "Study of Ancient Gaul and Ancient Celtic Culture"

Students of the John Carroll School Latin 2 class found themselves dissatisfied with their textbook depiction of ancient Celts and Gauls. Their solution? Create a wiki of online links relating to the subject. (map)

Archaeologist offers "tastes of the past"

Archaeologist Jacqui Wood is not afraid go back to the basics with her cooking. The author of Tasting the Past: Recipes from the Stone Age to the Present, Wood cooks in the style of the Romans and the Celts.

Bath's "Great Drain" to be inspected

Nearly 2,000 years after construction, the overflow from the Roman bath in Bath, England is going to be inspected. Archaeologists are excited at the prospect of discovering what Roman - and subsequent generations - threw down the drain.

3rd century Roman townhouse found under Canterbury theater

Archaeologists have discovered the ruins of a 3rd century Roman townhouse beneath the Marlowe Theatre in Canterbury, England. "It's quite unexpected," said archaeologist James Holman.

Antonine Wall: Scotland's hidden Roman treasure

When blogger Keir Roper-Caldbeck planned to bicycle the length of -- and report on -- Scotland's newest World Heritage site, the Antonine Wall, he thought it would be an easy task. That proved not to be the case. His blog of the journey is online.

US in better shape than Rome, says Cornell professor

"Almost everything that has happened [in the United States] over the last year has happened in some deviation before in the period that I study, which is essentially the equivalent of 2008 for the Roman Empire," said said Kim Bowes, Cornell assistant professor of classical archaeology at a recent lecture.

4th century Roman temple found in Tuscany

A rectangular stone and marble temple, built using the opus testaceum technique, has been discovered near Marina di Alberese in central Italy. The existence of the 4th century temple may suggest a larger settlement in the area.

A feast for the orgy

In an article for Remembrance of Meals Past, Corky White remembers the time she was asked to prepare a Roman feast for a Harvard professor.

Hadrian's Wall: cultural melting pot

Research shows that the Roman guards who occupied Hadrian's Wall came from a wide range of ethnic backgrounds, from northern to eastern European. Recently, evidence has shown that a fair number came from the Middle East.

Keeping up with the Ciceros

Reasons given for the study of Latin over the year have ranged from "better understanding of English" to "looks good on a resume," but a new reason, according to Globe and Mail arts columnist Warren Clements, might be "to keep up with all the amusing Latin books that have been pouring forth for the past 60 years."

Facebook adds Latin

Hebrew? Persian? Pirate Speak? Now Latin is the latest translation to be added to Facebook's Translations application.

Roman skeleton really Goth

The 5th century skeleton of a man, discovered in 1972 in Gloucester, England, has been identified as a Goth, originating from east of the Danube River. Experts feel that the man was most likely a Roman soldier.

US Army construction site unearths Roman settlement

A team of archaeologists from Mainz University have discovered what they believe is a 3rd century Roman settlement near Wiesbaden, Germany. The site was found during excavations for a new US$133 million Army Corps of Engineers housing project.

Murder or execution in Venta Icenorum?

"This is an abnormal burial," said archaeologist Will Bowden of the University of Nottingham, about the discovery of a male skeleton, buried with his hands tied behind his back. "It could be that the person was murdered or executed, although this is still a matter of speculation." (photo)