Roman

Classical Roman culture

Roman cavalry helmet found at Iron Age shrine

In the year 43 CE, a Roman cavalry helmet, decorated with a silver-gilt wreath of victory, was buried by an Iron Age tribe at a shrine in Hallaton, England. Experts are still considering how such a helmet came to be in tribal hands. (photo)

"Not a pretty picture" painted by pit of Roman skulls

In 1988, 39 skulls of adult men were discovered near the Museum of London. The skulls dated to Roman times and now are believed to have been gathered by "head hunters" who retrieved the heads of those who died in the nearby amphitheater. "It is not a pretty picture," said Rebecca Redfern, from the centre for human bioarchaeology at the museum of London.

Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources completed

For the last one hundred years, scholars have been digging their way through documents in order to create the Dictionary of Medieval Latin from British Sources, "the most comprehensive study ever" of medieval Latin vocabulary. The 16th and final volume of the dictionary was completed in early December 2013.

Antonine Wall to benefit from Historic Scotland 5-year plan

Central Scotland's Antonine Wall has never enjoyed the reputation as a tourist destination that its southern cousin, Hadrian’s Wall, has had, but a new 5-year plan proposed by Historic Scotland may change that fact. The development plan provides a "framework" for conservation and promotion.

Researchers create "virtual villa" using video game technology

Researchers at Indiana University, leading an international collaborative team, have used the Unity 3D game engine to create an interactive digital model of Hadrian's Villa, a Roman ruin located near Tivoli, Italy, for research and educational purposes.

Leicestershire lead coffin opened

A team of experts from Archaeology Warwickshire and York University have opened the 1,700-year-old lead coffin discovered recently near Hinckley, England, and have begun examination of its contents.

Galen: Prince of Medicine book reviewed

The online site for History Today recently featured a book review by Andrew Robinson for The Prince of Medicine: Galen in the Roman Empire by Susan P. Mattern.

Plans considered to unearth Roman baths in Exeter

The Dean of Exeter Cathedral in England is consulting with English Heritage about possible plans to make the Roman baths under Cathedral Green more accessible to the public. The baths were first discovered in 1971.

Touring Roman Britain

Jolyon Attwooll has compiled a list of the "must-see" sites of Roman Britain for a recent article in the Telegraph. The article includes photos, descriptions and links of some of the best tourist spots in the country.

University of Southampton receives grant to study Roman ports

The European Research Council has awarded the University of Southampton a EU€2.49m (UK£2.1m) grant to study 31 roman ports in nine countries. The study will focus on ports in the Mediterranean region during the first two centuries CE.

Roman eagle: one of the "finest artefacts ever unearthed in Britain"

An “exceptional” sculpture of a Roman eagle has been discovered in London. The statue, dating to the 1st or 2nd century, is made of Cotswold limestone and depicts an eagle with a snake in its mouth. (photo, video)

Roman skulls unearthed by "lost" London river

The Walborn River used to run through London until it was paved over in the 15th century. Recently the river made it's presence known when 20 skulls, dating to the 3rd or 4th century, were discovered washed from a Roman burial site.

Newport Arch to be restored

A 3rd century Roman arch in Lincoln, England, damaged by the country's recent cold and wet winters, will be restored through a UK£60,000 grant by the Waste Recycling Environmental Limited. The Newport Gate, which in Roman times was the gateway north to York, led to the suburb of Newport during the Middle Ages. (photo)

3rd century shop found at Roman Maryport

Archaeologists working at Roman Maryport, along Hadrian's Wall, have discovered evidence of six buildings and a road. One of the buildings is believed to have been a Roman shop.

Roman chainmail found in Harzhorn

German archaeologists are excited by the discovery of well-preserved Roman chainmail during excavations near Kalefeld in the Northeim district north of Göttingen, the first such armor recovered from a Roman-Germanic battlefield. (photo)

"Traditional methods" used to preserve Hadrian's Wall

"Hadrian's Wall is under constant pressure from the weather, from visitors, from livestock and other factors, and we need to work hard to protect and to conserve this icon of world heritage," said Bryan Scott, from the Hadrian's Wall Trust about the recent grant to rebuild parts of the wall.

Technology traces Roman beads to Egypt

A team of scientists from the Institute of Nuclear Chemistry at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Germany has analyzed glass beads found in former Rhaetian settlements in Bavaria, and concluded that the beads, dating from the 1st through 4th centuries, must have originated "somewhere near a soda lake like those in Wadi El Natrun in Egypt." (photo)

Shropshire ring declared treasure

The coroner in Shropshire, England has declared 6th century gold ring, found by a metal detectorist, treasure. The ring, which weighs 8.21g (0.3oz), probably belonged to an individual of high status. (photo)

Aspendos Gladiator School closing in Turkey

There will be unemployed gladiators pounding the streets of Antalya, Turkey after the closing of the Aspendos Gladiator School, where modern-day gladiators entertained tourists. The company cited "a poor tourism season" as the reason for the closing.

Portsmouth Roman well stumps experts

The discovery of a Roman well beneath a garden in Portsmouth, England has left archaeologists intrigued - and puzzled. The well contained Roman coins, a bronze ring, and the skeletons of eight dogs. (photo)

Roman temple near Hadrian's Wall identified

The remains of a building near Hadrian's Wall, dating to the second century and first unearthed in the 1880s by a local archaeologist, have been identified as a Roman temple. The temple is the most north western classical temple from the Roman world yet discovered.

Mars discoveries tweeted in Latin

It's only fitting that Mars, the Roman god of war, would be the subject of NASA's first official venture into the world of Latin social media with photos of the surface of the planet taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Latin captions were sent August 28, 2013 on Tumblr, Twitter and Facebook.

Archaeologists wish for project to protect Roman mosaics

Nearly 50 years ago, archaeologists uncovered a pair of beautiful mosaic floors, dating to the Roman era, at Chedworth Villa in Gloucestershire, England. Now the floors have been uncovered for study, leading to a discussion of a permanent building to house them. (photo)

High-class tableware among finds at Ewell site

Roman Ewell, in Surrey, England, was once located along the Stane Street, between London and Chichester, and acted as a market center, suppling travelers with accommodations and food for their journeys. Now the Church Meadow Project is taking a look at the 2nd century site and what it can tell experts about its history. (photos)

Late Roman well offers insight into technology

A well-preserved, late-Roman well near Heslington, England demonstrates use of the latest technology of the time, including curved stone facings and a dish-shaped base. Archaeologists from the University of York believe the well had "significance in contemporary local agricultural cycles and fertility practices."

The color of the Colosseum

A restoration of the Colosseum, currently underway, reveals frescos in a corridor that has been sealed off since the 3rd century. Unlike the moss-and-marble walls of today, the building interior, in its day, would have been a Technicolor extravaganza.

R.I.P. Lucius Valerius Geminus

Lucius Valerius Geminus is dead. In fact, he's been dead since the 1st century CE, but thanks to the discovery of his tombstone, archaeologists now know something about the Roman soldier who died in Oxfordshire.

Ancient horseshoe found stuck in a rut

Potholes may be a modern annoyance, but the recent discovery of a Roman horseshoe stuck in a rut shows that the problem is ages old. The 2000-year-old show was discovered recently under Liverpool Street in London. (photo)

Medicine: From Galen to Saturday Night Live

In an article for the website Inside Higher Ed, Scott McLemee looks at the contributions of Roman physician Galen, upon whose work most medieval medicine was based. The writer begins his story with a look at Steve Martin's portrayal of medieval doctor Theodoric of York on Saturday Night Live. (video)

Roman cemetery at Glevum excavated

Experts from Cotswold Archaeology have discovered a number of new burials in what they believe was the cemetery for the Roman city of Glevum, now Gloucester. "This is probably one of the most significant finds that has been made within Gloucester within the last 30 years. It will add greatly to the knowledge of the [city]," said archaeologists Stuart Joyce.