1601 CE and Later

Swords and swordplay entertain and educate public at Pottstown, Pennsylvania

Two SCA members who also cross over into 18th century fencing reenactment in the New World were among those who entertained and educated the public at the Pottstown, Pennsylvania May Day Festival. The Pottstown Mercury has the story, courtesy of Evan Brandt.

Portland Art Museum hosts exhibit of Renaissance art from Brescia

"Great Painters in Brescia From the Renaissance to the 18th Century" will be on display at the Portland Museum of Art, in Portland, Oregon, through September 17.

Dame Alys in England, Part Two

Dame Alys Katharine, from the Middle Kingdom, was one of several lucky SCAdians who recently attended "The Extravagances of the Edwardian Table" in England, at the same church used for the main hall scenes in the Harry Potter films. The culinary achievements on display were extraordinary, and Her Excellency was kind enough to share her experiences in this two-part SCAtoday.net feature story and photo album.

Dame Alys in England, Part One

Dame Alys Katharine, from the Middle Kingdom, was one of several lucky SCAdians who recently attended "The Extravagances of the Edwardian Table" in England, at the same church used for the main hall scenes in the Harry Potter films. The culinary achievements on display were extraordinary, and Her Excellency was kind enough to share her experiences in this two-part SCAtoday.net feature story and photo album.

Gwyrch Castle is Yours for UK£1.5m

In the market for a genuine Welsh castle? Granted, it was built in 1819, but Gwyrch Castle, located near Abergele in north Wales, is still a crenellated, towered and turreted wonder of architecture on 40 acres of land.

Plus ça change, plus ç'est la meme chose?

BBC Europe editor Mark Mardell muses over the similarities between the power structures of the European Union and those of an emerging feudal state.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 23, 1564

The most famous writer in the English language, William Shakespeare, was born on April 23, 1564.

Shakespeare First Folio to be Auctioned

A rare, 17th century, calf-bound volume of the plays of William Shakespeare is scheduled to be auctioned in the summer of 2006 at Sotheby's sale of English Literature and History.

"Stitch Counters" Cause Cancellation of Civil War Re-enactment

Some former participants are blaming "stitch counters," elitists who demand extreme authenticity for reenactors, for the cancellation of this year's staging of the Civil War Battle of Selma (Alabama).

Harry Potter, King Edward, and the SCA converge for a grand feast

What do Harry Potter, King Edward of England, and the Middle Kingdom all have in common? Elements of all three came together recently at Oxford, England, for a most exquisite feast.

Identity of Jamestown Skeleton Still Unknown

Extensive DNA testing has yet to reveal the identity of a skeleton found in the Jamestown, Virginia excavations. Researchers now doubt that the remains belong to Captain Bartholomew Gosnold.

World's Strongest Whiskey

A 300-year-old recipe for malt whiskey may produce the world's strongest single malt at 92 per cent. The drink is being produced at the Bruichladdich distillery on the west coast of Scotland.

Looking at the Face of the Bard

New research may prove that a death mask found in Darmstadt, Germany in 1842 may actually be that of William Shakespeare.

In Memoriam: John Brook-Little, Clarenceux King of Arms

John Brooke-Little, Clarenceux King of Arms of England, who did much through his persuasive writings to advance an interest in the subject of heraldry, died on Feb. 13, 2006 at the age of 78.

Pearson's Renaissance Shoppe

Renaissance clothing, costumes and accessories. Their authentic renaissance line includes wench costumes, twill bodices, Elizabethan clothes, princess gowns and dresses.

Time changes modern human's face

Modern people possess less prominent features but higher foreheads than our medieval ancestors, according to research on the changes to the shape of the human skull over the past 650 years.

New exhibit at the Folger on children's Shakespeareana

"'Golden Lads and Lasses': Shakespeare for Children" is on display at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC, through May 13.

Edinburgh's Short-hole Golf Course Site of Plague Burial

Edinburgh's revered Bruntsfield Links, a short-hole golf course, may actually be the grave site of vicitims of the city's Black Plague from the 15th and 17th centuries.

Historic Cornwall District Needs Volunteers to Preserve Archaeological Site

Wardens at an historic site in Cornwall are asking for help to conserve the archaeological remains on the landmark.

Shakespeare Film Festival

Set your Tivos! On Wednesday, December 14, 2005, Turner Classic Movies will hold a 24-hour-long Shakepeare film festival beginning at 6:00 am (EST).

Why We Document

Bridgette Kelly MacLean, from the Kingdom of AEthelmearc, relates a story about two weavers, a forgotten book and the importance of documentation for the future.

Jamestown Exploration Puzzle May be Solved

Researchers have long questioned Captain John Smith's claim that he explored much of the Nanticoke River in Virginia in a brief, three-day period during the summer of 1608. Now a new expedition may give them answers.

DNA Test of Jamestown Skeleton Inconclusive

DNA tests conducted on a 400-year-old Jamestown, VA skeleton have failed to prove that the remains are those of Jamestown founder Bartholomew Gosnold.

Imperial Turkish Costumes on Display

An exhibition of imperial Turkish robes and kaftans will be on display at the Smithsonian Institute's Sackler Gallery through January 22, 2006.

Turkish Textiles on display at the Sackler

"Style and Status: Imperial Costumes from Ottoman Turkey" is on display at the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC, through January 22.

Russian Orthodox Icons Subject of Restoration Project

Aleksei Khetagurov, chief of icon restoration for the State Historical Museum in Moscow, hopes to reveal the face of history - literally - as he cleans dark patina from the surfaces of centuries-old icons.

The Shakespeare Code

Da Vinci wasn't alone. Now Shakespeare appears to have a "code", according to a new book Shadowplay by Clare Asquith.

Historic Maps Stolen from British Library

Three 16th and 17th century maps have recently been stolen from bound volumes in the British Library. The theft is just the latest in a rash of crimes targeting libraries and museums.

New exhibit on Renaissance luxury goods at the Folger

"Consuming Splendor: Luxury Goods in England, 1580-1680" will be on display at the Folger Shakespeare Library, in Washington, DC, through December 31.

Paleography

The National Archives has an online tutorial on Palaeography, the science of reading old handwriting.