1601 CE and Later

Steampunk enthusiast creates historical-look laptop computer

"Datamancer", as Hieronymus Isambard "Jake" von Slatt is known online, is enthusiastic about packaging modern technology in historically inspired Victorian-era enclosures, an art form known as "steampunk." This time, the project is an exquisitely-crafted and fully-functional laptop computer.

Cooking with mummy

Just in time for holiday parties, Sarah Bakewell shares 17th century recipes for cooking with mummy! Mmmm... tasty!

Fire destroys "Lost Colony" costumes

A fire recently destroyed the section of the Waterside Theatre in Roanoke Island, North Carolina which housed historic costumes in the Irene Rains Costume Shop. Most of the costumes for Paul Green's play, the Lost Colony, were destroyed.

"Hornblower" props to go on the block

Over 300 of the props and costumes from the Hornblower television series will be auctioned in Maldon, Essex on October 3, 2007.

17th century toys found in Leicestershire

The discovery of a hidden stairway in Market Harborough parish church in 1988 has led to unearthing of one of the most important collections of post-medieval street toys in English history. (photos)

My Persona & Writings Page

I have begun building a site devoted to my persona, and the writings created by my persona.

I am a 15th century sailor aboard the ship known as "The Crimson Star". I serve as firstmate, and write fictional tales about our voyages, and adventures as a "merchant" ship. I also write poetry and will soon have other stories to add to the site. please feel free to visit at http://dalincaulder.ang

Cerne Abbas giant awakes to companion

Doh! Whether it was a prank or a scheme to market the new Simpsons movie, a giant painted Homer Simpson next to England's famous Cerne Abbas giant has irked the country's Pagan community.

John Smith, mapmaker

Among his many talents, explorer and early Jamestown resident Captain John Smith could count mapmaking. A map created by Smith in 1608 of the Chesapeake Bay river system has been compared recently with modern maps and found to have a "stunning level of accuracy."

Old box's booty turns out to be bountiful

The small box buried nearly four centuries with the wreck of a Spanish galleon was gently pried open Friday afternoon.

Exhibit on Renaissance Children on display in Austria

"Prinzenrolle," an exhibit on children and childhood in the Renaissance, will be on display at Schloss Ambras in Innsbruck, Austria.

Pennsic named to 15 Geekiest Vacations list

Sandwiched in between the Star Wars Odyssey Tour and a Star Trek convention is the Pennsic War, #5 in the list of the 15 best geek vacations.

Interview with historian Natalie Zemon Davis

Medievalists.net features an interview with Dr. Natalie Zemon Davis, Professor Emeritus of History at Princeton University, who currently teaches at the University of Toronto. Davis is the author of nine books and more than 80 articles, "many of which focus on the social and cultural history of 16th century France.

Amazing medieval tent

Members of House Greydragon share images taken at the Bavarian Army Museum in Ingolstadt, Germany in 2003 including an amazing medieval tent and armor.

Local news coverage in Adiantum

TV news reporter Meghan Kalkstein, from station KVAL, was on site at Egil Skallagrimson Memorial Tournament, held in the Barony of Adiantum, Principality of Summits, An Tir.

Nine Mile Portage Heritage Festival seeking re-enactors

David J. Brunelle, Heritage Co-ordinator for the Nine Mile Portage Heritage Festival in Barrie, Ontario, has announced that the festival is seeking re-enactors, artisans and entertainers for this year's festival which will take place September 21-22, 2007.

Atlantic shipwreck richest ever

Deep sea salvagers from Tampa-based Odyssey Marine Exploration may have retrieved the "richest sunken treasure ever discovered: hundreds of thousands of colonial-era silver and gold coins worth an estimated US$500 million from a shipwreck in the Atlantic Ocean."

Cutty Sark Burns

For those who love sailing ships, the famous British ship and "world's last surviving tea clipper," Cutty Sark, has been burned in what police are calling a "suspicious" circumstance.

Exhibit of European perceptions of foreign realms now at the NGA

"Fabulous Journeys and Faraway Places: Travels on Paper, 1450-1700" will be on display at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, DC, through September 16.

Exhibit of 16th & 17th century art celebrates 400th anniversary of Jamestown

"Rule Britannia: Art, Royalty, & Power in the Age of Jamestown" -- featuring the "Armada" portrait of Queen Elizabeth I, never before been exhibited in the U.S. -- will be on display at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, through August 12.

Bards in Space: Video Game to Teach Kids About Shakespeare

This just in! The Bard is going into space! Yes, that's right, folks, it's the showdown of the millennium...William Shakespeare vs. Alien.

Circling the globe with Portuguese sailors at the Freer Gallery

A new exhibit at Washington D.C.'s Freer Gallery, Encompassing the Globe: Portugal and the World in the 16th and 17th Centuries, "explores the artistic achievements that flourished when these sailors exposed new creative techniques and imagery to the world as they transported goods from port to port."

Exhibit on New World maps now on display at the Chrysler

"Envisioning Virginia 1587-1784: Early Maps of the New World" will be on display at the Chrysler Museum of Art, in Norfolk, Virginia, through August 12.

Pictures from Carolingia's Vision of the Twelve Goddesses

A new photo album is available online, with pictures of the crowd and delightful Savory Board at the Barony of Carolingia's presentation of Samuel Daniel's 1604 masque titled "Vision of the Twelve Goddesses".

Historic cooking seminar to be held at Virginia Tech

Chairman Cynthia D. Bertelsen has announced that a seminar on historic cooking in Virginia will be held April 20-21, 2007 at the Virginia Tech campus in Blacksburg, Virginia. The event is titled "From Jamestown to the Blue Ridge: Cooking up 400 Years of Culinary History in Virginia."

A history of rootbeer

The website essortment has a history of rootbeer from its origins as a miracle cure to its modern popularity as a social beverage. The site includes an early American recipe and a list of ingredients for the drink.

1607 flood in Wales and England studied by scientists at Newport forum

One of the worst natural disasters to ever hit Great Britain occurred 400 years ago last month. On January 30, 1607, a storm flooded over 200 square miles of south Wales and southwest England. Now a risk management company is looking at the modern costs of recovery from such a storm.

New exhibition of drawings at the Getty

"Made for Manufacture: Drawings for Sculpture and the Decorative Arts" will be on display at the Getty Center in Los Angeles, California, through May 20.

"Henries Towne" settlement found near Virginia Beach

Archaeologists working at a site on the Lynnhaven River in Virginia have discovered what they believe to be the remains of Henries Towne, a settlement contemporary with Jamestown.

400-year-old seeds help tell Jamestown story

The recent discovery of some 400-year-old seeds in a well at the Colonial Jamestown archaeological site has given researchers much to ponder about the life and survival skills of the early Jamestown settlers.

Shakespeare's Church Has Leaky Roof

The caretakers of the church where William Shakespeare was baptized and buried want help to fix its leaky roof. Holy Trinity Church in Stratford upon Avon is seeking sponsors to "adopt a gargoyle" and help the church provide the extensive maintenance needed.