1601 CE and Later

Archaeologists look for evidence of 1630s war in Connecticut

Researchers are scouring backyards in suburban Mystic, Connecticut, looking for remains of the Pequot War. They hope to use artifacts to help map the location of the battlefields.

Timely Treasured Threads.

Timely Treasured Threads is a store dedicated to providing a complete ensemble for you to dress yourself for your favorite period event, no matter the era. From accessories to clothes, "they have you covered."

Wasaga under Siege 2010

Wasaga under Siege – “A War of 1812 Experience” Nancy Island Historic Site, Wasaga Beach, Ontario, Canada July 23rd, 24th, 25th/2010

New insights into St. Augustine's central plaza

Archaeologists digging at the Plaza de la Constitucion in St. Augustine, Florida, are finding that the plaza is different than the plans authorized by the King of Spain in the late 1500's.

Shell analysis confirms early Virginia accounts

An analysis of oyster shells thrown away by colonists in Jamestown, Virginia, indicates that historical accounts of a severe drought in 1611-1612 are correct. The shells show that the James River was much saltier during those years than in the present day, indicating lower rainfall.

Shakespeare thief goes to trial

A book dealer is on trial in England for stealing a valueble first edition foilio of Shakepeare's plays. The book, which was stolen from Durham University, dates to 1623 and once belonged to Bishop of Durham John Cosi.

Stolen Descartes letter to be returned

A letter written by French philosopher Rene Descartes will be returned by Haverford College, Philadelphia, to the Institut de France.

Britain refuses to return Indian artifacts

A request from Archaeological Survey of India for the British government to return Indian objects removed from the country during British colonial rule has been refused, according to the Times of India.

17th century scientist predicted modern inventions

In the 1660s, Robert Boyle, chemist and Royal Society founding fellow, wrote a list of 24 future predictions about science and technology. All but a few have come true, many in the past fifty years.

Good King Henri IV enjoys renewed popularity in France

Peace-loving, religiously tolerant, a ladies' man and the coiner of the phrase "a chicken in every pot" -- 400 years later, France still thinks Henri IV is le Grand.

Computer experts to photograph and study medieval manuscripts

Researchers from the University of Kentucky Computer Science department are taking a road trip to England and Spain to photograph medieval manuscripts. They hope to use digital technology to reveal detail in the faded manuscripts that has been previously hidden.

Early music society offers youth summer camp

The San Francisco Early Music Society will offer an early music summer camp for children August 1-6, 2010 at the Crowden Center for Music in Berkeley, CA. The camp has a Three Musketeers theme and will be directed by Tish Berlin.

Oberammergau Passion Play tradition in peril?

For 400 years, the people of Oberammergau have staged the Passion Play once a decade as a thanksgiving for being spared from the Black plague. Now, a new kind of plague is testing the faith of performers and audiences .

Archaeological dig confirms United States' oldest street

For generations, St. Augustine's Aviles Street has competed with Philadelphia's Elfreth's Alley as the oldest street in the United States, but a recent archaeological dig may hand the honor to the Florida city.

Public ideas subject of CBC program

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation has produced a series of programs based on Modern Publics: 1500-1700, a book by a group of scholars at McGill University. The program is podcast online.

German spire out-leans Pisa

The leaning tower of Bad Frankenhausen in the German state of Thuringia has tilted since at least 1640, and it now leans at an angle of 4.8 degrees -- sharper than the more famous tower in Pisa, Italy, which has only a 3.9 degree slant.

Tycho Brahe to be exhumed

A November exhumation is planned to try to discover the true cause of Tycho Brahe's death. Since a 1901 analysis discovered mercury in a sample of his beard, some have believed the astronomer, "more famous in death than he ever was in life," was murdered.

Early 18th century shoes found in German wall

Eight high quality shoes dating to around 1708 were discovered recently in the Gothic tower of a palace in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany.

Midrealmer's work on National Geographic Channel

Medieval bookmaker Randy Asplund, RanthulfR in the Society for Creative Anachronism, reports that several of his books will be used as props on an upcoming program about the Malleus Maleficarum, entitled The Witch Hunter's Bible.

"Double Falsehood" finally attributed to Shakespeare

Experts have now credited co-authorship of the play Double Falsehood to William Shakespeare and another dramatist, John Fletcher. The play was originally discovered nearly 300 years ago.

Shakespeare scholar takes on authorship issue

Author James Shapiro, whose 1599: A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare, delighted the literary world, has a new book, this time investigating whether the Bard of Stratford-upon-Avon actually wrote his plays. Robert McCrum of The Observer has a review.

Erwin Tomash Library offers insight into history of computing, geometry, and mathematics

A casual interest in the history of computing led Erwin Tomash, who started his career in computer engineering in the 1940s and became one of the pioneers of the information age, to compile an encyclopedic, illustrated catalog of primary source references dating back to the 12th century CE. The catalog is available online for free access.

Source of Aqua Traiana discovered

British father and son filmmaking team Ted and Michael O'Neill believe they have found the source of the Aqua Traiana, the 2nd century aqueduct, constructed by the Emperor Trajan, 30-40km northwest of Rome. (photos)

Renaissance shoes on display in Toronto

The Bata Shoe Museum in Toronto is playing host to On a Pedestal: From Reniassance Chopines to Baroque Heels, an exhibit that "explores two of the most extreme forms of footwear ever worn in Western fashion, the outrageous platform chopine and its eventual replacement, the high heel." (photos)

1602 map shows China at the center of the world

In 1602, when he created the first Chinese map to name the Americas, Matteo Ricci was a Jesuit missionary living in Bejing. His map is currently on display at the Library of Congress in Washington, DC. (photo)

Renaissance portrait gallery highlights jewelry

Illusion Jewels, a retailer of medieval and renaissance jewelry, has created an online portrait gallery featuring classic paintings from the 15th - 17th centuries that feature jewelry.

Waterhouse enchants at Montreal Museum of Fine Arts

Those longing for the romance of Arthurian times may want to check out J. W. Waterhouse: Garden of Enchantment, an exhibition of the artist's work at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts through February 7, 2010.

Galileo relics found

Records report that, in the 18th century, three fingers, a tooth and a vertebra were removed from the tomb of Galileo Galilei and placed in a container. Since then, a finger and the vertebra have turned up, but the tooth and other fingers were still missing. Now, two fingers and a tooth have been found and are scheduled to be placed on display.

Hear Shakespeare's music online

The cast album for the recent production of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, starring Audra McDonald and Anne Hathaway, is available to hear online.

Lost settlement of Argall Towne found

Alain Outlaw of Archaeological & Cultural Solutions, has been looking for Argall Towne since 1975. The elusive, short-lived settlement was started in 1617 near Jamestown, Virginia, by Capt. Samuel Argall, best known for kidnapping Pocahontas in 1613.