1601 CE and Later

Vatican archive preserves missionary documents

A video from the series Rome Reports, posted on YouTube, describes objects contained in the Vatican's archive of documents and artifacts kept and sent by missionaries from 1622 until modern times. (video)

Tales and Ceremonies at the Tower of London

Go behind the scenes at the Tower of London. Learn about the "Oldest Ceremony in the World"; read about the "bribe" ships pay to traverse the Thames; see photos of the graffiti carved into the very stones of the cells of the Tower!

Shipwrecks reveal lives of medieval Swedes

Experts from the Swedish Maritime Museum are thrilled by the discovery of five shipwrecks dating to the 16th through 18th centuries, found during a quay renovation in central Stockholm. The ships, some measuring 20 meters (66 feet), are in good condition.

Historical Japanese mathematics website online

The National Diet Library of Japan has created a website for the study of Wasan, the mathematics that developed in Japan before the Edo period with text written by Mr. Sato Ken’ichi, Associate Professor, University of Electro-Communications, and Orita Hiroharu, Library Counsellor of the National Diet Library.

13th century Scotland is closer than you think

Medieval Scotland can be closer than you think...in New York, for instance. A home inspired by a 13th century Scottish castle is up for sale in New City, New York, just an hour north of Manhattan.

Ancient stone may hold the fate of modern London

The Stone of Scone and the Tower Ravens may have some competition. A fight has broken out over the fate of London's Stone of Brutus. A development company wants to relocate the stone, while tradition holds that, "So long as the Stone of Brutus is safe, so long will London flourish."

Activists argue for exoneration of Germany's witches

Between 1500 and 1782 CE, 25,000 people, including children, were tortured and executed for witchcraft in what is today Germany. Now activists, such as retired Protestant minister Hartmut Hegeler, are seeking to exonerate as many as possible of the German "witches."

Discovering "a way of life from an age gone by"

Longing to live the life of a British farmer during the reign of King James I? Now, while you may not be able to live it, you can certainly watch how a group of people take on the task of working a Jacobean farm. The 12-part series, Tales from the Green Valley, is available on YouTube.

17th Century "fairytale cottage" may have link to dark history

Workers from United Utilities in the village of Barley, England, were "stunned" to discover a well-preserved 17th century cottage during a construction project. The cottage included the bones of a cat found inside a wall, possibly put there to ward off evil spirits.

Pocahontas' wedding site discovered

Scholars and preservationists at the historic site of Jamestown, Virginia, believe they have discovered the remains of one of the country's oldest Protestant churches, the site where Pocahontas was baptized and married.

Historical event seeks 19th century re-enactors, musicians and displays

Algoma 1812 is looking for re-enactors, artisans, entertainers, historical displays, musicians, merchants, etc., to join them from July 17th to July 22nd, 2012 to help launch Algoma 1812’s kick off for the War of 1812 Bicentennial, at Fort St. Joseph & Ermatinger Clergue National Historic Sites, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, Canada.

British Male Progeniture and Act of Settlement overturned

A vote by the 16 members of the British Commonwealth has allowed a daughter of William and Catherine the possibility to ascend to the British throne. The rule of male primogeniture, giving males precedence over females in British royalty, dating to 1689, was recently overturned.

The history of print comes full circle

First there was the printing press. Then the printer. Then the PDF, and then the e-book reader. And then there was...the printing press?  The Sacramento Public Library is about to become one of the few libraries in the nation to operate an Espresso Book Machine.

The venerable bagel

Long a New York favorite and portable feast choice of SCA college students everywhere (hint: they can be easily smuggled out of dining halls), finding solid documentation for the bagel as a medieval foodstuff has been a challenge.

Amazing 17th century traveling suit at Durán Textiles

In  the past, Durán Textiles has showcased some amazing women's garb in their newsletter. Now it's the man's turn. The latest issue concentrates on an elaborate 17th century embroidered traveling suit worn by King Gustav II Adolf of Sweden, who ruled 1615-1632.

British defendent demands trial by combat over UK£25 fine

Leon Humphreys, of Bury St Edmunds, England, failed to notify the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) that his Suzuki motorcycle was off the road, incurring a UK£25 fine, but instead of payment, Humphreys demanded the ancient right to trial by combat.

Canadian Castle for sale: Dungeon included

For less than a cool CAN$1 million, you can own your own castle getaway, a short drive from the Canadian capital city of Ottawa, complete with "guard tower, battlements, dungeon, and a moat." (photos)

London plans international Shakespeare festival for 2012

Beginning on April 23, 2012, a multilingual Shakespeare festival will celebrate culture in parallel with the London Summer Olympics. Professional and amateur companies will present the Bard's plays in dozens of languages and hundreds of productions.

Reproduction Antique and Medieval Doors

CastleReign creates reproduction antique and medieval doors for your home, tavern, art studio, game room, garden and other areas around your home and business. 

Pilgrimage for the modern penitent

Walking to Compostella is so 1482! Today, pilgrims reach Santiago de Compostela by bicycle, bus, and even airplane. This is one of many ways that the famed Pilgrim route has adapted to the modern world.

Food fit for a Stuart king

An article in the UK's Southern Reporer takes a looks at food and how local meals were shaped by political circumstance in Stuart Scotland (1603-1746).  Through battle and peace, famine and plenty, recipes changed to fit the times.

Sackler Gallery receives collection of Tibetan Buddhist Art

The Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington D.C. has announced that it has received a collection of Tibetan Buddhist art from collector Alice S. Kandell. Objects in the collection date from the 12th through 20th centuries CE.

Madrid researchers search for bones of Miguel de Cervantes, author of Don Quixote

Researchers are about to undertake a Quixotic quest - to find the lost bones of Miguel de Cervantes. They are believed to be somewhere in a convent in Madrid.

Drug testing Shakespeare

Anthropologist Francis Thackeray believes William Shakespeare was a pothead -- really -- and hopes to exhume the bard for drug tests. Thackeray's petition for exhumation has been made to the Church of England, based on his research done over the past ten years.

Renaissance Clothing by The Tudor Shoppe

Renaissance Costumes and medieval clothing for those with discriminating taste. Also, buttons, patterns, notions, jewelry, tapestries, toys, swords, panther tents, and more.

New Three Musketeers film to premiere in October 2011

An updated, 3-D version of Alexander Dumas' adventure The Three Musketeers will appeare in theaters in October 2011.

Archaeology project explores evolution of Jamestown fort

No one expected archaeologist William Kelso to find the "lost" English fort built at Jamestown, Virginia in 1607, but he did. Now the 70-year-old expert hopes to follow the evolution of the fort with the help of university students. (video)

Coin composition tells story of Europe's Price Revolution

Anne-Marie Desaulty believes coins can tell a story. She and colleagues from the University of Lyon are using mass spectrometry to study isotopes of lead and copper found in coins of the 16th and 17th centuries in hopes of discovering the cause of the great Price Revolution.

Archaeologists hope to find Shakespeare's final home

Excavations are under way at New Place, in Stratford-upon-Avon, the site of William Shakespeare's last home. The site, which has not been excavated to the level of Tudor times, has already yielded some artifacts of the period.

Wasaga under Siege

Just a quick reminder that Wasaga under Siege “A War of 1812 Experience” is approaching fast.