1601 CE and Later

17th Century Shipwreck to be Protected

The wreck of a 17th century ship off the coast of Dorset, England, will now be protected from treasure hunters and unlicenced divers by the British government.

Colloden Nearly a Tossup?

A new study of the Battle of Culloden shows that the Highlanders were closer to winning than previously thought. New excavations of the 1745 battlefield show that Jacobite fighters nearly broke the English lines.

"Original" Shakespeare Dialect has a Southern Twang

This summer, the Globe Theatre in London will perform an "original production" of Shakespeare's Troilus and Cressida using 16th century dialect as close as possible to what the Bard would have spoken.

Science Program Looks at Plague in England

A transcript of "The Plague in Britain," from The Science Show discusses the gruesome visit of the plague in 1665 to the village of Eyam, England with author Robert Lacey.

Commedia del'Arte to Tour Country

"Arlecchino, Servant of Two Masters," a Piccolo Teatro di Milano production, will be touring the country this summer and fall, bringing laughs and mayhem to audiences unused to the theatrical form.

Sources for Late Period Costuming

"Early Modern Notes," a costuming website for re-enactors, discusses sources for information on late period garb.

Lost notes on alchemy by Isaac Newton found

Researchers at the Royal Society, a British scientific association, have discovered notes on alchemy by Sir Isaac Newton that were previously thought to have been permanently lost.

English DNA May Solve American Mystery

Is a skeleton found at colonial Jamestown, Virginia that of the colony's founder Capt. Bartholomew Gosnold? Scientists hope to solve the mystery by studying English DNA.

17th Century Islamic Brass Superior to European

A study by archaeometallurgists has determined that 17th century brass astrolabes constructed by Indian artisans were centuries ahead of their European counterparts.

Barenaked Shakespeare

Celeste Headlee of Detroit Public Radio reports on the Canadian rock group Barenaked Ladies' familiarity with the songs of William Shakespeare.

Shakespeare 2007: Arts Groups Plan Ambitious Citywide Festival in Washington, DC

The Washington Post reports on a citywide Shakespeare festival planned for 2007 in the U.S. capital, bringing together everyone from the Folger Shakespeare Library and Washington Shakespeare Company, to The Tiny Ninja Theatre.

17th Century Bathroom Discovered in Derbyshire

A 17th century "bathing room," possibly influenced by Sir William Cavendish, has been discovered in an abandoned outbuilding at Bolsover in Derbyshire, England.

"Fashion in the Age of Louis XIV" at UCLA

Fashion in the Age of Louis XIV, a two-day symposium sponsored by the University of California, Los Angeles, will explore fashion during the age of Louis XIV.

Scots Fight to Save Culloden from "Space Invaders"

Developers are eyeing the land adjacent to Scotland's Culloden battlefield with dreams of housing projects which would, according to some, "destroy the sense of place."

Elizabethan Body Armor Discovered at Jamestown

Archaeologists working on excavations at the colonial Jamestown settlement have discovered, largely intact, a "coat of jacks," a rare example of 17th century body armor.

Shakespeare portrait a fake, say experts

Top art authorities at the UK's National Portrait Gallery have determined that one of the best-known portraits of William Shakespeare was painted two centuries after his death.

Welsh Tsunami, 1607

A new theory speculates that a flood, which killed 2,000 people in southern Wales in 1607, may have been a tsunami.

New Book Documents Italian Renaissance Scam

William Grimes of the New York Times reviews The Scarith of Scornello: A Tale of Renaissance Forgery, a new book by Ingrid D. Rowland about Renaissance forgery that rocked the literary world.

Muslim Charity Claims Ownership of Taj Mahal

The Sunni Waqf Board, a Muslim charitable organization that oversees Muslim graveyards, has laid claim to India's Taj Mahal.

Gunpowder Plot Descendents Bury the Hatchet

Descendents of the major parties involved in England's Gunpowder Plot of 1605 have shaken hands, a reconciliation marking the 400th anniversary of the event.

Remains of Cape Cod Explorer to be Verified

Researchers are hoping that DNA tests will confirm the identity of Capt. Bartholomew Gosnold, privateer, explorer and namer of Cape Cod.

Experts Puzzled by "UFO" Coin

A 17th century French coin seems to depict a "flying saucer over a countryside," but what was intended to be portrayed remains a mystery.

Exhibit on horse armor at the Met

"The Armored Horse in Europe, 1480–1620" will be on display at the Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Gallery of the Metropolitan Museum of Art through January 15, 2006.

"Spain" on display at the Norton

"Spain in the Age of Exploration 1492-1819" will be on display at the Norton Museum of Art, in West Palm Beach, Florida, through May 1, 2005.

Syke's Sutlering

Syke's offers books, clothing, and other accoutrements (largely for 17th century goods, but also some for earlier periods).

eircom.net: 17th Century Curtain Wall Found at Carrickmines Castle

The 80-metres-long remains of what is thought to be a curtain wall has been discovered at Ireland's Carrickmines Castle.

Brueghel Painting Sells for $7 Million

The Kermesse of St. George, by Pieter Brueghel the Younger, was among the paintings auctioned at Sotheby's recently.

Exhibit on letter-writing in the Renaissance opens at the Folger

"Letterwriting in Renaissance England," on display at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC, through April 2, 2005 traces the evolution of Renaissance letter-writing.

Renaissance Painter Rediscovered

Pope Urban VIII's nephew stole 2 altar paintings from a church in Urbino in 1632 and smuggled them to Rome. Today these paintings are being displayed and ascribed to the original painter, Fra Carnevale.

Artwork from Renaissance Dresden on display at the Met

"Princely Splendor: The Dresden Court, 1580–1620" will be on display at the Special Exhibition Galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art through January 30, 2005.