French

French and Frankish culture and history

Queen Claude Prayer Book acquired by Morgan Library

Several months ago, the Morgan Library and Museum received a new treasure: the prayer book of Queen Claude of France, a contemporary of Anne Boleyn. Bound in red velvet, the book is smaller than a credit card and contains "fifty-two folios, painted front and back with a hundred and thirty-two miniature illuminations."

"Dancing Plague" still puzzles scholars

On a street in Strasbourg, France in the summer of 1518, a woman began a fervent 6-day dance that led to a month-long dancing frenzy by more than 400 people. Modern scholars are still undecided about what caused the "Dancing Plague."

Alleged Bayeux vandal cleared

In an announcement at the major conference on the Bayeux Tapestry which took place recently at the British Museum, Anna Eliza Stothard was cleared of an accusation of vandalizing the tapestry.

Was King Arthur French?

King Arthur might have been French. Heresy? Not according to the organizers of "King Arthur: A Legend in the Making," a medievalists' conference at Rennes University. Many of the Arthurian tales are set in Brittany in the north of France.

French Templar tomb found

The remains of a Templar knight have been discovered in a tomb near Rennes-le-Chateau, France along with a cache of gold and coins. The mummified body wore the still-recognizable shroud of the order. (video)

Teribus to perform in Midrealm

Teribus (featuring Midrealm drummer Nevik) will be performing their first concert within the borders of the Barony of Fenix in the Middle Kingdom on March 22, 2008.

Renaissance Dance Database

The Renaissance Dance Database is a tool for accessing the various dance resources available on the web. It enables searching by style, creator, primary source, or number of dancers. Suggestions of new links and resources are always welcome.

Medieval music manuscripts online

Genevieve la flechiere, of the Kingdom of Drachenwald, reports the discovery of a blog (mainly in French) dedicated to medieval illuminated manuscripts and, in particular, music manscripts.

Revisionist Joan of Arc angers historians

A new book by French journalist Marcel Gay claims to prove that Joan of Arc was a French royal who did not die on the stake but was rescued by the English.

Burgundian exhibit on display in Belgium

"The Dawn of the Burgundian Century" will be on display at the Groeningemuseum through January 6, 2008.

Palace of the Gauls shows surprising sophistication

Contrary to popular belief, the Gauls during the time of Julius Caesar may not have been the rough barbarians as depicted in the Asterix books but a civilized society whose leaders lived in palaces.

Gay civil unions may have 600-year precedent

In an upcoming article for The Journal of Modern History Allan A. Tulchin cites the study of documents and grave sites as evidence for homosexual civil unions in 15th century France.

French fashion trend setters for 1400 years

A new study of clothing from Anglo Saxon graves by archaeologist Penelope Walton Rogers shows that most styles followed the customs set in northern France.

Medieval crucifix found in trash can

An enameled medieval crucifix stolen from France by the Nazis has resurfaced in an Austrian rubbish skip. It was discovered by a china-fancier looking for old plates in the belongings of a deceased neighbor.

Roman farmers leave agricultural legacy

Archaeologists working in the Tron­çais forest of France have discovered over 100 Roman settlements, the legacy of which continue to affect the ecology of the area.

Agincourt and Baronial Champions

description:
We invite one and all, young and old to join us for a day of fighting and feasting, arts and sciences, glory and revelry to be remembered! Our event autocrated by the talented Lord Liam MacanTsaoir is themed on the battle of Agincourt that was fought in northern France as part of the Hundred Years' War. The battle was fought on a rainy day, the feast day of Saint Crispin, in 1415 between the English and Welsh army of King Henry V and the French army of King Charles VI. Location:
Barony Marche of the Debatable Lands (Dorseyville, Pennsylvania)

Istanpitta to return to Pennsic 2007

Istanpitta Early Music Ensemble will again be performing at Pennsic this year.

Caerthan 12th Night

description:
15th Century France - a time of many changes for France and despite wars and plague, there is happiness! The latter part of the 15th century The Lady and the Unicorn tapestries were commissioned by the La Viste family. They depict the 5 senses and Love.

This years 12th Night will embody elements that will tintalate your 5 senses and let's not forget LOVE. Come and be prepared to See, Hear, Smell, Touch and (let's not forget the feast), Taste. Of course "A mon seul desir" (meaning: "to my only desire"), will play an important part. Mistress Mirianna and Mistress Gabrielle are working on creating the six tapestries, which will hang in the hall. There will still be room for your banners, so please bring them to hang in the hall alonside the tapestries. Location:
Barony of Caerthe (Aurora, Colorado)

Map reveals English and Scots may have fought on the same side

The discovery of an ancient map may show that the English and the Scots fought side by side at the 16th century Siege of Leith, the battle which brought about the end of the Auld Alliance.

Four Queens: The Provençal Sisters Who Ruled Europe

Four Queens: The Provençal Sisters Who Ruled Europe, is a nonfiction history book set in 13th-century medieval Europe and follows the story of the four daughters of Count Raymond Berenger V and Beatrice of Savoy.

Rib bone NOT Joan of Arc's

John Leicester of the Globe and Mail reports on the ongoing controversy over the remains of Joan of Arc. The verdict: It is a rib bone, but it did not belong to Joan of Arc.

Bayeux Tapestry comes to life

avidavid62 has posted an animated version of the Bayeux Tapestry on YouTube where the paintings actually move. The film was created by David Newton.

French re-enactor shares armor research

On his website, French re-enactor Bernhardt de Teyssonnière (his period name) shares photos of his armor as well as the sources he used for his research.

Medieval French illuminations now on display at the Getty

"French Manuscript Illumination of the Middle Ages" will be on display at the Getty Center in Los Angeles through April 15, 2007.

Bones probably not those of Joan of Arc

Eighteen experts, working to determine if a rib bone and a piece of cloth belonged to St. Joan of Arc, have not completely finished their task but now feel that "there is relatively little chance that the remnants are hers."

Martin Scorsese to Develop Medieval Movie for Paramount

Martin Scorsese has signed to direct a screen version of Eric Jager's book The Last Duel: A True Story of Crime, Scandal and Trial by Combat in Medieval France.

Joan of Arc Relic Authenticity in Doubt

A piece of bone and fragment of blackened cloth preserved in France since the fifteenth century may not be authentic relics of St. Joan. A new scientific examination of the items raises questions.

Charlemagne Story Filming in Europe

Love and Virtue, a film about Charlemagne based on The Song of Roland and Orlando Innamorato, will feature an all-star cast including John Malkovich, Peter O'Toole, Stephen Dillane and Darryl Hannah.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 14, 1066

The Battle of Hastings was fought on October 14, 1066 between William the Bastard's Norman forces and the Saxon defenders under King Harold II. It changed forever the culture and language of the British Isles.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 10, 732

Charles Martel's forces won the Battle of Tours fought on October 10, 732. Gibbon and other traditional historians credit his victory with saving Christian Europe from Muslim domination.