French

French and Frankish culture and history

The Crusader Bible on display at the Morgan Library

The Maciejowski Bible, better known as the Crusader Bible, is the star of a new exhibit at the Morgan Library and Museum in New York City. The 13th century manuscript is considered one of the greatest illuminated manuscripts in the world. It will be on display through January 4, 2015.

Medieval furniture lecture at Castlerock Museum

Anplica Fiore reports that the Castlerock Museum in Alma, Wisconsin will host a lecture entitled Medieval Furniture of the Maciejowski Bible on November 30, 2014 at 2pm.

Chivalry died at Agincourt

In an excerpt from his book Agincourt: My Family, The Battle And The Fight For France, in the Mail Online, English writer and adventurer Sir Ranolph Fiennes discusses his ancestors' parts in the 1415 Battle of Agincourt, the day, he writes, chivalry died.

French necropolis offers "rich grave goods"

Archaeologists in Saint-Aubin-des-Champs, France have discovered a burial ground containg more than 300 graves dating from the 5th through 7th centuries. The graves were single burials and included "rich grave goods." (photos)

Was the Black Prince really so evil?

British school children all know about the evil Black Prince Edward of Woodstock, who put to death 3,000 innocents after the siege of the French town of Limoges in September 1370. But the discovery of a letter written by Edward may change his image forever.

Earliest case of Down syndrome diagnosed in French skeleton

A team of archaeologists at the University of Bordeaux has identified the earliest known case of Down syndrome in the remains of a child who lived in 6th century France. The diagnosis was made after the remains were submitted to a (CT) scan.

Illuminated Mystery Play Is Digitized

The British Museum has digitized, in two online volumes, a highly-decorated copy of a French medieval mystery play, with illuminations depicting scenes from the play.

Templar interest increases with approaching 700th anniversary

With material such as The Da Vinci Code to capture the public's attention, the myths of the Knights Templar are more popular than ever. Lawyer, noveliest and historian Dr Dominic Selwood has a feature article for The Telegraph.

Archaeologists surprised by medieval remains at Gallo-Roman site

The last thing that archaeologists working on the Roman site of Intaranum near Entrains-sur-Nohain, France expected to find was a mass grave in a well dating to the 8th-10th centuries.

Archaeological forensics not like CSI

The public has learned to expect DNA testing to answer all archaeological questions, but this is not always the case according to Stephanie Pappas, Senior Writer for LiveScience. One good example is the mummified head, long believed to be that of King Henry IV of France, the investigation of which has led experts on a merry chase.

DNA study proves French relics not royal

Three years ago, French scientists identified a mummified head as that of the beloved French king, Henri IV, but now new DNA research proves that the relic did not belong to a royal. Henri IV ruled from 1589 to 1610.

New sources on the Battle of Crécy

The October 2013 issue of History Today magazine features an article by Richard Barber which looks at recently discovered sources on the Battle of Crécy (1346). An excerpt from Edward III and the Battle of Crécy is available free online. The entire article is reserved for subscribers to the magazine. (photo)

The historic beauty of Rouen

Rouen, france is the home of the Cathedral Notre-Dame de Rouen and of Gustave Flaubert, the spot where Joan of Arc was burned and where painters Claude Monet and Roy Lichtenstein were inspired. Nell Casey of the New York Times visited the city and writes of its beauty. (photos)

Coroner's inquest finds coin pendant treasure

A coroner's inquest has declared an "early-medieval gold pendant created from an imitation of a Byzantine coin," found in a field in Norfolk, England, to be treasure. The necklace was created as an imitation of a Byzantine-era coin, and is believed to have been made in France. (photo)

The comics of Stephen Harding

Comic books are often scorned as inferior forms of literature, originating in 1930s American pulp culture, but Damien Kempf on Tumblr traces the art form back to the 12th century with the manuscript the Bible of Stephen Harding.

Medieval guide to witch hunting

What do you know about witches? Most modern ideas of witchcraft may come from a manuscript, one of only four known copies, found in the library of the University of Alberta. Treatise against the Sect of Waldensians, written in the 15th century, created the framework for witch hunts. Paul Kennedy of CBCRadio hosts an hour-long podcast on the book.

Face of "headless king" revealed

Four hundred years after his death, facial reconstructionists have revealed the face of France's 'Good King Henri IV' whose mummifed head is believed to have been discovered in an attic in 2008.

Ransom profitable for medieval rank-and-file

History has recorded that the ransom of kings and nobles was a popular way for armies to raise money during the Middle Ages, but new research shows that the practice may have also been popular among common soldiers.

Historians argue over head of Henry IV

Historians continue to debate over the authenticity of a mummifed head found in the attic of a tax collector. Some believe it is the remains of "good King Henri" (Henry IV of France, murdered in 1610), while others believe the claim is "rubbish."

Saint-Denis - A Town in the Middle Ages

A web site offers a wide-ranging virtual tour of the area, from the town and abbey to the inhabitants, crafts, daily life, and archeology from the 4th century through the Middle Ages and up to today.

Our Lady of Paris to receive new bells

Notre Dame de Paris, on the River Seine, has seen over 8 centuries of history, from the Crusades to World War II. Now the city will fête the world's best-known church in a year-long celebration that will include recasting of its bells.

The forging of Frankish swords

In a scholarly paper, an abstract of which was published recently at Medievalists.net, K.F. Werner examines techniques for forging Frankish swords from 700-1000 CE. Werner disputes the generally-accepted techniques.

Travel through time with Queen Margot

Travel through time with this French video which portrays changes in fashion from 1550 to 1615 through the person of Queen Margot. The short video is available on YouTube.

[MID] Yule Feast XVI

Come join us for a day of Merriment, Feasting, Classes, and Challenges to ring in the holiday season as their Excellencies, Raffaele and Margherita, chime in this glorious season by selecting new Rapier, and A&S Champions for the upcoming year.

French demand England pay restitution for Plantagenet killing

The French city of Angers has petitioned the British government for compensation payment in the death of Edward Plantagenet, son of Edward IV and nephew of Richard III of England, who died in 1499. The city was the medieval capital of Anjou, whence the Plantagenet family originated.

"Charlie" and "Al" change western grammar

In the 8th century, the literate began to use uppercase letters in their writing. According to business writing expert Stephen Wilburs, the change can be traced to Charlemagne (Charlie) and Flaccus Albinus Alcuinus (Al) as a means to make reading easier.

Indiana Jones of the graveyards

34-year-old Philippe Charlier works with the dead - long dead - and likes it that way. Nicknamed the "Indiana Jones of the Graveyards," Charlier is France's most famous forensic anthropologist, and his patients are the country's historic personages the likes of Henri IV and Charles III.

Ghent Altarpiece digitized

For the past year, a team of art historians has been working on a conservation project for Hubert and Jan van Eyck’s “Mystic Lamb,” better known as the Ghent Altarpiece. Along with the conservation, the altarpiece has been photographed at extremely high resolution to be released online.

Henry VI Psalter Now Online

A fully digitized version of The Psalter of Henry VI has been added to the British Library's ongoing project of digitizing some of their manuscript treasures.

Medieval Science Manuscripts Now Digitized

The British Library began the final phase of an 18-month project, and has uploaded numerous scientific works to its Digitised Manuscripts site, with more additions in the coming weeks.