1601 CE and Later

Grimms now grimmer

There are no Disney endings for the fairy tales in a newly-released translation of Grimm's Fairy Tales by Jack Zipes, a professor emeritus of German and comparative literature at the University of Minnesota. The original stories, written in the early 19th century, have never been directly translated into English.

The geometry of fencing

In 1628, Girard Thibault wrote Académie de l’Espée, a rapier manual based on mathematical foundations. Science historian Daniel Margocsy of Slate offers a feature article on the fencing tome. (photos)

Dig to explore medieval town and plantation in Northern Ireland

Experts in Antrim County, Northern Ireland, are intrigued by evidence of a "lost" medieval town beneath a plantation-era Gaelic Scottish settlement and a 16th century castle. The evidence consists of a metal buckle and a silver groat, both dating to the 1550s.

Kickstarter project to publish book on Japanese heraldry

SCA member and medieval Japan enthusiast Xavid has started a kickstarter project to fund the English translation of a book on Japanese Heraldry with over 200 full-color reproductions.

Wasaga under Siege coming to Ontario in August, 2014

Wasaga under Siege 2014 & the 200th Commemoration of Battle of Nottawasaga Bay and the Sinking of HMS Nancy, August 14th-17th 2014.

Plumbing problem reveals crusader murals

A burst pipe in Saint-Louis Hospice, a Jerusalem hospital, has led workers to rediscover 19th century wall murals depicting "crusader knights and symbols of medieval military orders." The paintings were the work of Comte Marie Paul Amédée de Piellat, a French count, who believed himself descended from the knights. (photos)

Teller talks Tempest

In celebration of William Shakespeare's 450th birthday, magician Teller (the quiet one), recently co-directed a new version of the Bard's magicial play, The Tempest. In a video, Teller discusses the production with Mark Mobley for a segment of NPR's The Record.

Society Knight uses both Pen and Sword

An SCA member from An Tir, Sir Brand deux Leons has achieved his dream, as his Shakespearean-style play "To Each Their Own" is now in publication. Sir Brand seeks funding and participation from the SCA performing arts community to help drive a full stage production of the work.

Heidelberg Castle destroyed in digital recreation

Explosions thunder, and smoke rises, in a digital animation of the destruction of Heidelberg Castle by the French in 1693 in a new video commissioned by the Reiss Engelhorn Museum in Mannheim, Germany for its exhibition Die Wittelsbacher am Rhein. The castle was once considered the "eighth wonder of the world." (video)

British Library adding over a million images to Flickr

The British Library has announced that it will be adding its collections of public domain digital images to Flickr. The first collection set is Highlights from the Mechanical Curator, which includes images from over 65,000 books from the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. Other collections are also scheduled to be added.

Pre-fire London virtualization wins game company award

Travelers to London are sometimes disappointed to find little of the city's medieval past on tourist maps, thanks to the 17th century fire which destroyed much of the city. Now a team of students offers the next best thing with a virtual "fly-through" of Tudor London.

Shakespeare: Women in tights

From Sarah Bernhardt to Helen Mirren, women have longed from - and won - the meaty male parts in Shakespeare's plays. New York Times columnist Alexis Soloski looks at women playing Shakespearean heroes in a recent article.

DNA study proves French relics not royal

Three years ago, French scientists identified a mummified head as that of the beloved French king, Henri IV, but now new DNA research proves that the relic did not belong to a royal. Henri IV ruled from 1589 to 1610.

Cheapside Hoard scores dedicated exhibition at the Museum of London

In 1912, a tenement building in Cheapside, in the heart of London, was demolished, unearthing one of the rariest treasures in the city's history. Vivienne Becker, of the Telegraph, offers a feature on the Cheapside Hoard, currently on display at the Museum of London. (photos and video)

Cambridge University lawbreakers catalogued

Jacky Cox, Cambridge University's archivist, has a monumental job ahead of her: creating the first catalogue of thousands of court records from the 16th and 17th centuries, chronicling the misdeeds of students, staff and townspeople attached to the university. About half of the records from Vice-Chancellor's Court (1540-1630) are now summarised online.

Scotland's Tapestry Project

Needleworkers in Scotland have created a very cool tapestry project, the world's largest, according to the BBC.

Mars discoveries tweeted in Latin

It's only fitting that Mars, the Roman god of war, would be the subject of NASA's first official venture into the world of Latin social media with photos of the surface of the planet taken by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Latin captions were sent August 28, 2013 on Tumblr, Twitter and Facebook.

Galileo ice debate continues

Why does ice float on water? This was the subject of debate between Galileo and his arch-enemy Lodovico delle Colombe during the summer of 1611, which brought into focus some of the odd properties of water.

Earl of Sandwich risked health with frozen chocolate delight

In 1668, the Earl of Sandwich collected recipes for chocolate, a treat just introduced to England believed to be "unwholesome." His iced chocolate recipes are a highlight of a paper by Dr Kate Loveman of the University of Leicester entitled The Introduction of Chocolate into England: Retailers, Researchers, and Consumers, 1640–1730.

Branagh to bring Macbeth to New York stage

Sir Kenneth Branagh will bring his version of "the Scottish play" by William Shakespeare to the drill hall of the Park Avenue Armory in New York City in June 2014. Sir Kenneth said: "I am delighted that we have the chance to recreate Macbeth in this epic setting."

SCA author seeks backing to create tailoring series

SCA member and author Allan Mathew Gnagy has created a kickstarter campaign to publish the first of a series of period tailoring manuals devoted to men's tailoring of the early 17th century. The first volume focuses on doublets.

Five Winds Trading Company

Five Winds Trading Company is dedicated to turning your dreams into a reality, through the efforts of third-generation artisans, craftspersons, and merchants. They are committed to creating the highest quality products to assist you in achieving the look that fits your period.

Climate change threatens Jamestown

Venice may not be the only historic city threatened by rising ocean waters caused by climate change. Jamestown, the first successful English colony in America, may soon be under water. Christopher Joyce of  NPR's All Things Considered has the audio story. (photos)

The impact of Shakespeare's investment

In 1594, William Shakespeare made a move that gave him financial stability and, some say, changed the way he wrote plays: he purchased a one-eighth share in the Lord Chamberlain's Men. One of those people is Dr Bart van Es of Oxford University's Faculty of English Language and Literature, who claims that the purchase gave the playwright a better relationship with and understanding of actors.

The valor and villainy of Shakespeare's Star Wars

"'Tis a tale told by fretful droids, full of faithful Wookiees and fearstome Stormtroopers, signifying...pretty much everything," reads the description for Ian Doescher's new Shakespearean parody, William Shakespeare's Star Wars.

New world duel may be the answer to colonial murder mystery

Excavations in 1996 at Jamestown, VA (USA) revealed that one of its earliest settlers died of a gunshot wound. Researchers now believe they have solved his murder. They believe the man was named George Harrison and that he was killed in a duel.

Wasaga under Siege and Sails on the St. Mary seek re-enactors

Building on the huge success of past Wasaga under Siege events, the Historic Military Establishment of Upper Canada in partnership with the Town of Wasaga Beach, Ontario Parks, Town of Collingwood and Nancy Island Historic Site look forward to hosting you once again from August 16th to the 18th, 2013.

Historical Costume Contest winner announced

Earlier this year, Sandy Gowland of Old Time Patterns issued a challenge: create an historical costume. Some entrants used existing patterns, while others made their own. The winner was announced on May 25, 2013. The results can be viewed on the website.

Medieval Times: The Movie

In a move that is tragically not part of an SCA Today April Fool's story, two Hollywood production companies are teaming up to make a movie based on Medieval Times "Dinner and Tournament" theme restaurant.

"Lizzy" may have belonged to Sir Walter Raleigh

Shipwreck diver Todd Stevens hopes he has found a gem at the bottom of the ocean near the Isles of Scilly in the form of the Lizzy, a shipwreck which may have belonged to Sir Walter Raleigh. Raleigh lost a ship, the Flying Joan, in the area in 1617.