1501 CE to 1600 CE

English class looks at vagrancy laws in Tudor England

The Cornell College (Mount Vernon, Iowa) website, which publishes the writings by students in the class, Women Writers in the Age of Shakespeare, includes a short essay on vagrancy in Tudor England. The article, Vagrancy in Sixteenth and Seventeenth Century England, was written by Sara Byrnes.

First church in Peru found

Peruvian and Spanish archaeologists recently used historical documents from an archive in Spain to help locate the site of Peru's oldest Roman Catholic church near Piura on the country's northern coast. The church was built in 1534.

Metal detectorist finds Tudor wedding ring

An inscribed woman's wedding ring, believed to date to the Tudor period, has been found by a metal detectorist in Boroughbridge in North Yorkshire, England. The inscription on the gold ring is unreadable.

Sing to the Hand!

Students of music in the Middle Ages would have learned their notes in a different manner than their modern counterparts. They would have learned the Guidonian Hand, a mthod in which "a map of notes  was arranged on the hand."

16th century Spanish artifacts found in Georgia

Jewelry and other artifacts from the 1500s have been found in an excavation of a Native American village in Georgia (USA). The artifacts suggest that conquistador Hernando de Soto may have travelled far off course in his exploration of Florida and points west.

Life of Jewish patroness Benvenida Abravanel explored

In an article for The Jerusalem Post Magazine, writer and professor of Jewish history Renee Levine Melammed explores the life of Benvenida Abravanel, a 16th century resident of Naples and Ferrara, known for her philantrophy and patronage of David Hareuveni, the 16th century messianic claimant.

Prestwich family treasures found on York farm

Craig Best and Derek Greenwell struck paydirt in 2010 when the two metal detectorists discovered a gold signet ring and a pilgrim badge bearing the image of St George. The coat of arms on the ring indicated that it belongs to the Prestwich family of Hulme in Manchester. (photo)

Shakespeare film sure to spark controversy

Anonymous, the new film by director Roland Emmerich which proposes that the plays of William Shakespeare were actually written by someone else, is causing controversy even before the film hits theater screens. James Shapiro offers his opinion in an op-ed for the New York Times.

Michelangelo's David heralds beginning of modern science

Most people viewing Michelangelo’s magnificent sculpture of David admire its artistic beauty and proportion, but to Dr. Kelly Cline, the statue symbolizes something else: the birth of modern science. The article appears in the Independent Record (Helena, Montana).

Nonsuch Palace rebuilt

Nonsuch Palace, the Surrey home of Henry VIII, built to rival French King, Francis I, has been rebuilt - as a 2.2m by 1.2m (7ft 2in by 3ft 11in) model. (photo)

Tudor bestiary resource online

Calligraphers, needleworkers, heralds and artists take note. The Retronaut website has posted pages from the Tudor Pattern Book published around 1520.

First phase of St. Peter's Colonade restoration revealed

Rome Reports has released a sort video on YouTube showcasing the newly renovated left Colonnade at St. Peter's Basilica in Rome.

Hampton Court Roundels Restored

Damaged by years of exposure to the weather, four of the most seriously deteriorated Hampton Court roundels have been restored and will be shown to the public.

[LOC] One House Divided: A Tale Of Two Cities

You are invited to the palace of the Doge of Venice to witness the end of a long standing dispute between the widow Sammicheli of Venice and Fortunato of Florence. As it is an Italian feast of 1585, expect intrigue, plotting, bloodshed, poisonings, mayhem and murder. As well as lots of good food.

"Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge" at Sackler Museum

Visitors to the Arthur M. Sackler Museum of Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts, will have the opportunity to view 16th century woodcuts, engravings, and etchings relating to the study of science when the museum presents Prints and the Pursuit of Knowledge in Early Modern Europe.

16th century artillery and fireworks book digitized

The Bayerische Staatsbibliothek (Bavarian State Library) has digitized, and made available online, the Artilleriebuch by Walther Litzelmann, originally published in 1582.

Artemisian wins the Realm of Venus Italian Renaissance Costuming Challenge

The Realm of Venus' 4 month long Italian Renaissance Costuming Challenge is over, with 14 finalists from around the world completing the challenge to make an Italian Renaissance outfit from the skin out.

Artifacts reveal early history of Elsyng Palace

Excavation of one of Henry VIII's palaces has revealed that the site was an affluent home long before Henry VIII moved in. Elsyng Palace is located in Enfield, England.

"Legendary Swedish warship Mars" found in Baltic Sea

Andreas Olsson, head archaeologist at the Royal Swedish Maritime museum, believes that a team of divers has discovered the wreck of the Mars, the "legendary Swedish warship lost in a sea battle with the Danish-Lübeckian navy in 1564."

Res Obscura offers review of Rensaissance clothing book

The blog Res Obscura offers a review of the book Dressing Up: Cultural Identity in Renaissance Europe by Ulinka Rublack, which chronicles the importance of clothing to the merchant class during the Renaissance.

London plans international Shakespeare festival for 2012

Beginning on April 23, 2012, a multilingual Shakespeare festival will celebrate culture in parallel with the London Summer Olympics. Professional and amateur companies will present the Bard's plays in dozens of languages and hundreds of productions.

Reproduction Antique and Medieval Doors

CastleReign creates reproduction antique and medieval doors for your home, tavern, art studio, game room, garden and other areas around your home and business. 

Oxford crucifixion painting may be a true masterpiece

When a painting of the Crucifixion was purchased for Campion Hall at the University of Oxford in the 1930s, the buyers never dreamed they had a true Renaissance masterpiece painted by Michelangelo himself. (photo)

Excavations to begin on Henry VIII’s Welsh blockhouse

After his divorce from Catherine of Aragon, Henry VIII found himself feuding with France and forced to defend his seacoast. Archaeologists now plan to excavate one of the buildings thought to have been constructed for such defense: a blockhouse on the Angle Peninsula in Wales. (photo)

Bridge to Jewish past found in Vilnius, Lithuania

Excavations of the 16th century Great Synagogue in Vilnius, Lithuania, have uncovered the site of the Aron Kodesh, or Holy Ark, along with "part of the original floor, and the top of one of the four pillars surrounding the bima."

Graham Ryder discusses the firearms of Henry VIII

In a short BBC video, Graham Ryder from the Royal Armouries in Leeds discusses Henry VIII's fascination with and promotion of firearms.

Portrait of Elizabeth of York revealed

Duncan Leslie of Hever Castle explains about the importance of Elizabeth of York, the mother of Henry VIII, in a short BBC video. A 16th century portrait of the queen has been recently revealed.

Proportional Lime Type Foundry

Proportional Lime Type Foundry issues a line of electronic fonts, based on historical exemplars, suitable for print and web use. The historical period fonts offered at reasonable prices are excellent reproductions of the originals with added functionality such as extended punctuation and characters for modern use.

Ruling with an iron hand - literally

In the early 16th century, Gottfried “Götz” von Berlichingen, a knight  - and rogue - of the Holy Roman Empire, found his hand ripped off by a cannonball during the Siege of Landshut. This did not stop the staunch German, however, who had an iron prosthetic crafted to replace the appendage. PG-13 for language.

Remains of Irish beauty discovered at Dungannon

Archaeologists working on a dig at Dungannon, Ireland's Castle Hill have discovered what experts believe are the remains of Mabel Bagenal, third wife of the Earl of Tyrone, Hugh O'Neill, and known as Ireland's "Helen of Troy."