1501 CE to 1600 CE

Artifacts push back timeline on Spanish Colorado

Recent archaeological discoveries indicate the Spanish search for gold may have taken them into Colorado much earlier than previously thought.

Landsknechte to hold re-enactment in Germany

Landsknechte from around the world will gather in April for the Second International Landsknecht Hurra 2012 to be held in Oberzollhaus, Germany. The event has been created for members of Landsknecht.org.

Second International Landsknecht Hurra 2012

The contemporary world of landsknecht re-enactment is as heterogenous as the slashed and hacked cloth worn by its inhabitants. For years there has been dreams and rumors about an international Musterung to bring all sistren and brethren together for one great feast.

Found! Jane Seymour's Letter Informing King Henry of Newborn Son

Written in 1543, the letter from Jane Seymour to King Henry VIII, informing him of the birth of Prince Edward, had been carefully stored on a shelf at the Dunham Massey estate, but no one knew it was there.

Shakespeare's grammar key to his prominence

Dr. Jonathan Hope believes that the key to William Shakespeare's success was not the words that he used, but the way in which he used them. In a chapter in his new book on the English language, Hope finds that the Bard's grammar and word ordering are what set him apart from other writers.

Period embroidery resources online

On her embroidery website, Kathryn Goodwyn (C. Kathryn Newell) shares articles and period resources for embroidery done in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

Touring Hampton Court Palace

Historic Royal Palaces has a YouTube site which includes a video for school children who will be visiting Hampton Court Palace.

Does gun prove Portuguese discovery of Australia?

In 2010, a family discovered an antique gun buried in the sand on Dundee Beach in Australia's Northern Territory. The artifact, which resembles a 16th century swivel gun, has revived the theory that the continent was discovered by Portuguese seafarer Cristovao de Mendonca in 1521. (photo)

Flowers of the Needle embroidery series

Mistress Kathryn Goodwyn has opened a website for her period modelbook collection, "Flowers of the Needle."

Flowers of the Needle

Mistress Kathryn Goodwyn has opened a website for her period modelbook collection, "Flowers of the Needle." She offers up eight historical embroidery pattern books for free download, plus her treatise on voided embroidery styles. (All have been previously published within the SCA).

Shipwrecks reveal lives of medieval Swedes

Experts from the Swedish Maritime Museum are thrilled by the discovery of five shipwrecks dating to the 16th through 18th centuries, found during a quay renovation in central Stockholm. The ships, some measuring 20 meters (66 feet), are in good condition.

Henry VIII Decapitated...in Painting

Why was Henry VIII’s face replaced in the painting “Field of the Cloth of Gold”?  The facial image of him on horseback is not the original, and theories abound as to why he was “decapitated”.

Erotic Tudor love poem discovered in West Virginia library

English gentlewomen of Tudor times, especially, married Catholic women to Protestant scholars, were not supposed to pen love poems to men, but this did not deter Lady Elizabeth Dacre, whose work was recently discovered in a 16th century copy of Chaucer.

Guinea pig joins the ranks of favorite medieval pets

Was there a guinea pig sitting in the cage of a 16th century classroom? A new archaeological find proves it's possible. The 3rd ever early European guinea pig skeleton has been found in Belgium. Experts believe it was buried like a pet.

Mona Lisa Has a Twin

The Prado Museum in Madrid recently announced that it has what is thought to be the earliest copy of Leonardo da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa”.

Historical Christmas celebrations in London

Countess Alys Katharine reports that two sets of photos of Christmas interpretations, taken by British photographer and historical interpreter "spiral_tower," are available on Flickr.

Ancient stone may hold the fate of modern London

The Stone of Scone and the Tower Ravens may have some competition. A fight has broken out over the fate of London's Stone of Brutus. A development company wants to relocate the stone, while tradition holds that, "So long as the Stone of Brutus is safe, so long will London flourish."

The Queen's Servants: a review

On the blog KimikoSews, the author offers a detailed review of the book The Queen's Servants by Caroline Johnson which focusses on clothing of the serving class in Tudor England.

The secrets of the Mary Rose

In 1545, Henry VIII's flagship, the Mary Rose sank while fighting the French in the Solent, the straits north of the Isle of Wight in England. The remains of the ship were rediscovered in 1971, catching the imagination of historians worldwide. A documentary, Ghosts of the Mary Rose, is available online.

Inventory of Catherine Howard's jewels online

The Art History News blog has published the full transcribed inventory of Catherine Howard's jewels, from the manuscript in the British Library. The transcription was done by Tudor historian Alasdair Hawkyard and compiled by Nicholas Bristowe, who was clerk of the King's wardrobes.

"Forgotten treasure" returns to Glastonbury

For the first time in 125 years, the Glastonbury Grace Cup, a 16th century, carved oak tankard, believed to have once belonged to the abbots of Glastonbury, is on display until January 31, 2012 in the abbey museum. (photo)

McParland’s, Parnell Street, Ireland's oldest timber-frame building

An unassuming building with an interesting chimney in Ennis, County Clare, Ireland, may be “potentially one of the most exciting urban archaeological discoveries in Ireland in recent years.” The building, currently under restoration, is believed to be Ireland’s earliest surviving example of a timber framed house. (photo)

Chatham's Tudor shipyard confirmed

Archaeologists working on a dig in Chatham, England have confirmed that a dockyard dating to the time oif Henry VIII existed on the site of the Command House pub on the banks of River Medway. Officials hope to make a bid to declare the dockyard a World Heritage site.

Italian officials concerned about effect on pollution on The Last Supper

Milan, Italy is one of Western Europe's most polluted city, and art historians fear for the survival of Leonard daVinci's Last Supper located on a wall of the refectory of Santa Maria Delle Grazie Church.

"The Manor Reborn" showcases 16th century home

The BBC program, The Manor Reborn, has restored a 16th century manor house to four distinct periods of its history.

Vatican publication claims Shakespeare was Catholic

The new film Anonymous, which debates the authorship of Shakespeare's plays, has opened a new controversary: the playwright's religion. L'Osservatore Romano reports that references in several plays prove that the Bard was Roman Catholic.

The musical sounds of 16th century Venice

Musicians and choir directors have long speculated on what music of the past would have sounded like. Now a new study by a student and a professor from New York University and the University of Cambridge may offer a sample from 16th century Venice.

Reproduced Stirling Heads images online

Lord Mungo Napier reports that all 37 of the reproduction Stirling Heads, from Stirling Castle in Scotland, are available as full colour images on the Stirling Castle website.

New from The Tudor Tailor: The Queen's Servants

The Tudor Tailor, publishers and authors of books on re-constructing sixteenth century dress, have announced the publication of their latest book: The Queen's Servants: Gentlewomen's dress at the accession of Henry VIII by Caroline Johnson.

Desperately seeking Sir Francis

The quest for the body of Sir Francis Drake, who died at sea in 1596, is on. Pat Croce, owner of a pirate museum, believes he has discovered the location of Drake's body off the coast of Panama.