1501 CE to 1600 CE

Silver hoard linked to Kett's Rebellion

A small hoard of silver found in 2011 by metal detector enthusiasts Steven Clarkson and Mark Turner has been linked to Kett's Rebellion, the 1549 uprising against "rich robber barons who had stolen the common land, leaving the peasants to starve." (photo)

Remains of celebrated de' Medici condottieri exhumed

Gino Fornaciari, professor of forensic anthropology and director of the pathology Museum at the University of Pisa, leads a team of scientists who recently exhumed the body of Giovanni de' Medici, considered one of the greatest warriors of the age. The team plans to study the body to better understand Renaissance surgery.

Scone Palace archway restored

In September 2010, the historic, 16th-century arch leading to the grounds of Scone Palace in Scotland was destroyed when a delivery truck misjudged the size of the arch's opening. Now, after two years, the arch has been restored. (video)

The elite archers of the Mary Rose

Scientists from the University of Swansea have concluded that among those lost with the sinking of the Mary Rose, King Henry VIII's flagship, in 1545, were elite longbowmen. The conclusion was made after the study of over 100 skeletons found on the remains of the ship.

Henry VIII's Crown - An Update

A  new 11-minute video from Hampton Court Palaces provides details of the behind-the-scenes construction of the replica crown worn by Henry VIII.

Conservation of a Mary Rose hat

One of the many fascinating items found on the Mary Rose, the sunken fastship of King Henry VIII, is a knit hat. A recent photo from the Mary Rose's Facebook page (public) shows a conservator working on preservation of a hat. (photo)

Lacock Cup to be sacrificed to pay for church roof

Some parishoners of St Cyriac’s Church in the village of Lacock, Wiltshire, England are upset over the proposed auction of the town's cherished medieval chalice, the Lacock Cup, in order to finance repairs to the building's roof. (photo)

Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum to receive grant

The Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum project has received a grant of UK£900,000 to promote community archaeology and to "encourage dialogue about this historic battle and how it has impacted communities from both sides of the Borders."

Tycho Brahe not poisoned

For over 400 years, rumours have surrounded the death of Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe, including one which suggested that Brahe was murdered using mercury by his assistant Johannes Kepler. Now, after two years, evidence from the scientist's exhumed body disproves the theory.

Raising of Mary Rose marked

Tudor archers with longbows marked the 30th anniversary of the raising of Henry VIII's flagship, the Mary Rose, from the floor of the Solent. The BBC celebrated the occasion with a short video.

16th century artificial hand

The loss of limbs in the Middle Ages and Renaissance was a fact of life, so it is no surprise that armorers were employed to fabricate prosthetic hands. One, made of iron, is featured on the My Armoury.com website. (photo)

Subject of Holbein painting identified

X-rays and infra-red photography used during conservation work on a portrait by Hans Holbein the Younger have identified the subject as Hans, a merchant working in London's steelyards, rather than the goldsmith Hans of Antwerp, the identity given to the man for over 400 years.

Travel through time with Queen Margot

Travel through time with this French video which portrays changes in fashion from 1550 to 1615 through the person of Queen Margot. The short video is available on YouTube.

US government determines Drake landed at Point Reyes, California

Apparently fed up with four centuries of sqabbling, US Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar has designated the Point Reyes Peninsula, north of San Francisco, in Marin County, California, as the site where Sir Francis Drake came ashore and claimed the land for England.

Elizabethan tapestry reveals surprises

The recent cleaning of an Elizabethan tapestry map of the English Midlands has revealed some surprises including the Neolithic Rollright Stones and "cottages nestled among the trees." The tapestry will be used as part of the British Museum's Shakespeare: Staging the World. (photo)

Urban legend in the medieval theater

In the Middle Ages, as in modern times, actors found a sense of drama in creating stories about murder and madness in the theater. The Medieval Snuff Drama by Jody Enders chronicles such a tale.

Dine with the Bard in Minneapolis

The Minneapolis Institute of Arts will present Supper with Shakespeare: The Evolution of English Banqueting December 13, 2012-March 31, 2013, an exhibit celebrating the spectacular dining experiences during Tudor times.

The passion of Elizabeth Dacre

Women were rarely recognized as poets in Tudor England, but the chance discovery of a love poem by Elizabeth Dacre to Sir Anthony Coke has given new insight into courtly love in Elizabeth I's time. Dr. Elaine Treharne of Stanford University discusses the poem in podcast for WAMC's Academic Minute.

Shakespeare in 37 Languages

Ever wanted to hear Julius Caesar in Italian, Romeo and Juliet in Portugese, or Othello in hip hop?

Hampton Court - Rooftops and Stairs

Sixty-four photos in one album show Hampton Court from the vantage of the rooftops and 16 photos record various staircases in the Palace in the other album.

Young Henry VIII

Is this an illustration of a young Henry VIII weeping at his mother's death?

Henry VIII's Crown and Pew

Henry VIII's crown has been recreated for display at Hampton Court in the newly restored "Royal Pew" in the Chapel Royal.

"Significant" archaeological find revealed by Cowgate fire

In 2002, a devastating fire badly damaged the World Heritage site of Cowgate in Edinburgh's Old Town, but the clouds of smoke has a silver lining with the recent discovery of street frontages and tenements dating to the 16th century beneath the fire site.

Website features playing cards through history

Want to know what a deck of cards looked like at Henry VIII's table? How about Salladin? The World of Playing Cards is the place to find out!

Spanish Inquisition follows priest to the New World

According to trial records, Catholic priest Pedro Ruiz Calderón not only practiced Black Magic, but he was really good at it. The trial took place as part of the Spanish Inquisition in Mexico City in 1540.

Wisconsin museum to host interactive da Vinci machine exhibition

The History Museum at the Castle in Appleton, Wisconsin will play host to the touring exhibition Leonardo da Vinci: Machines in Motion from September 22, 2012 through January 6, 2013. The museum will also present activities and events related to the exhibit.

Proof of the 16th century shave horse

An article on the Popular Woodworking Magazine website weighs into the discussion of the use of shavehorses, a combination vice and workbench used to prepare wood for a lathe, in the 16th century with an illustration from a period German source.

16th century woman's prayer book reissued for modern readers

Seder Nashim, a 16th century siddur for women, and written in the Ladino language, is being reissued in Hebrew by the Ben Zvi Institute. The book The book was written by Rabbi Meir Benbenishti.

16th century trader's house reconstructed in Wales

St Fagans: National History Museum near Cardiff, Wales is richer now with the addition of a 16th century Tudor building, meticulously rebuilt, and now open to the public. The trader's house was originally used for the storage of goods for sale in the busy port town.

Photographer documents decline of Italian villas

Once the grand homes of Italian nobles in the Renaissance, the villas of northern Italy still hold hints of their grandeur. Photographer Thomas Jorion documented these lost treasures in a gallery show entitled Forgotten Palaces. (photos)