1501 CE to 1600 CE

Wisconsin museum to host interactive da Vinci machine exhibition

The History Museum at the Castle in Appleton, Wisconsin will play host to the touring exhibition Leonardo da Vinci: Machines in Motion from September 22, 2012 through January 6, 2013. The museum will also present activities and events related to the exhibit.

Proof of the 16th century shave horse

An article on the Popular Woodworking Magazine website weighs into the discussion of the use of shavehorses, a combination vice and workbench used to prepare wood for a lathe, in the 16th century with an illustration from a period German source.

16th century woman's prayer book reissued for modern readers

Seder Nashim, a 16th century siddur for women, and written in the Ladino language, is being reissued in Hebrew by the Ben Zvi Institute. The book The book was written by Rabbi Meir Benbenishti.

16th century trader's house reconstructed in Wales

St Fagans: National History Museum near Cardiff, Wales is richer now with the addition of a 16th century Tudor building, meticulously rebuilt, and now open to the public. The trader's house was originally used for the storage of goods for sale in the busy port town.

Photographer documents decline of Italian villas

Once the grand homes of Italian nobles in the Renaissance, the villas of northern Italy still hold hints of their grandeur. Photographer Thomas Jorion documented these lost treasures in a gallery show entitled Forgotten Palaces. (photos)

The dichotomy of greed in medieval Europe

While the world's financial crisis plays out, historians compare today's commercial world to the past. one, Stanford historian Laura Stokes, ponders how attitudes on greed were different in the Middle Ages. Camille Brown, of Stanford University News, has the story.

16th century social networking

A team of experts from the University of London, Royal Holloway, and the British Library and Reading University has discovered documents to prove that 16th century Italian Academies created networks to share information.

The memorable Elizabethans

In a recent review for the New York Times, James Shapiro looks at The Elizabethans by A. N. Wilson, which chronicles the lives of a number of eminent men and women of late Tudor times "who made the age so memorable, including the most remarkable of them all, Queen Elizabeth."

Wolsey's Gate "tagged" with graffiti

Wolsey's Gate, a Tudor tower built by Cardinal Thomas Wolsey in Ipswich, England, was the subject of vandalism recently when the 16th century brickwork was covered by graffiti.

Website created for medieval English inquisitions post mortem

The website Mapping the Medieval Countryside: Places, People, and Properties in the Inquisitions Post Mortem has been created to provide online access to records of the "recorded lands held at their deaths by tenants of the crown."

German cloister windows grace English church

A feature in Vidimus Magazine, a journal dedicated to medieval stained glass, showcases twelve 16th century demi-figures found in windows at Holy Trinity Church, Hatton, Warwickshire, England. The figures depict Old Testament kings and prophets. (photos)

Project Gutenberg offers ebook English Embroidered Bookbindings

Project Gutenberg has posted the free ebook English Embroidered Bookbindings by Cyril James Humphries Davenport on its website. The book, free for download, features full text, illustrations and color plates.

Whitechapel Road home of London's first black community

Parish records reveal that black citizens were in residence in Tudor England, especially after the beginning of the reign of Elizabeth I. The free people lived, worked and married in the city, in particular around Whitechapel Road in east London.

German debt goes unpaid for 450 years

In 1562 the town of Mittenwalde, Germany made a formal loan to  Berlin of 400 gilders.  Berlin never paid the money back, and at the agreed upon 6% interest Berlin now owes Mittenwalde 11,200 gilders, the equivalent of 137 million US dollars.

Elizabethan pottery hoard found in England

A large amount of glazed late16th century pottery has been found in a garden in Rainford, England. The find includes many drinking vessels.

Fifth copy of "the birth certificate of America" found

Experts previously believed that only four copies of the 16th century Waldseemueller map still existed, but a fifth copy has been discovered between the pages of a 19th century book in Munich's Ludwig Maximilian University. (photo)

Early Shakespeare theater found

Archaeologists from Museum of London Archaeology report that they have discovered the remains of a playhouse where Willianm Shakespeare staged some of his earliest plays. The Curtain Theatre north of the river Thames in Shoreditch pre-dated the Globe.

Scientists claim to have found the remains of Mona Lisa

Archaeologists excavating the Convent of Saint Ursula in Florence believe they have found the remains of Lisa Gherardini, thought by art historians to be the model for Leonardo DaVinci's famed Mona Lisa.

16th century censorship

Long before the internet, writers with opinions contrary to those of the powers-that-be were victims of censorship. One such writer was the Dutch humanist Erasmus of Rotterdam whose writings were considered in conflict with the Catholic Church.

Is American English More Period than British English?

Linguists have reconstructed how Elizabethan English sounded, and it is closer to some American pronunciations than current British ones. The modern British accent developed relatively recently -- late 1700s and early 1800s.

Luxury home once birthplace of opera

Paolo and Gabriella Mazza of Florence, Italy combined a work project with a new home when they purchased La Camerata, as the 3,444-square-foot (320 square meters) theater, believed to have been designed by Renaissance architect Filippo Brunelleschi. (slideshow)

Hard tack and salt beef and beer, oh my!

Scientists from Oxford University have determined the diet of sailors aboard the Mary Rose, based on the study of 80 skeletons from the Royal Naval Hospital, as well as the shipwreck. Their report has been published in the American Journal of Phsyical Anthropology.

Handbag museum to open in Korea

The next time you are in Seoul, Korea, make sure to visit the Simone Handbag Museum, whick opens in the Gangnam District in August. The museum will feature mostly European purses from the 16th century through modern times.

16th century Korean boy helps scientists decipher hepatitis B genetic code

Israeli and Korean scientists have teamed up to study the remains of a Korean child, dating to the 16th century Joseon Dynasty, which show evidence of the hepatitis B virus. The results led to the map of the entire ancient hepatitis B viral genome.

The myth of the "Tudor Era"

"The word 'Tudor' is used obsessively by historians," says Dr Cliff Davies of Oxford University "But it was almost unknown at the time." Davies research shows that the term "Tudor" was rarely used during the period.

The writers of Shakespeare

On his blog, The Drum, journalist Bob Ellis returns to the controversy of the authorship of Shakespeare's plays with examples of how the bard - or any modern playwright - can claim complete ownership of his work.

Good and evil in Machiavelli's "The Prince"

400 years after its publication, Niccolo Machiavelli's The Prince still inspires analysis and comment. One of the latest is a two-part story by Nick Spencer in the Guardian. The premise of the article: How do we utilise power to do good while utilising evil to keep power?

Queen's jewelery found in medieval toilet

Archaeologists excavating a latrine at the site of a palace outside of Paris, France have found a hair pin belinging to 16th century French queen Catherine de Medici.

The Tudor court from Cromwell's point of view

Henry VIII and his succession of wives continue to capture the imaginations of historians and readers of history. Now, a new novel, Bring Up the Bodies, by Hilary Mantel, follows the life, trial and death of Anne Boleyn and the involvement of Thomas Cromwell. Peter Green of The Book blog has a review.

"Tantalising clue" to Raleigh's lost colony

In a discovery worthy of Dan Brown, experts believe they may have found Sir Walter Raleigh's "lost colony" of Roanoke inscribed on a 16th century map in invisible ink. (photos)