1501 CE to 1600 CE

Documents from St. Augustine, Florida shed light on life in the New World

The earliest documents relating to the city of St. Augustine, Florida (USA) are being digitized for preservation. The documents cover the time period from 1594 to 1763 CE.

Macclesfield Alphabet Book showcases 16th century design

The recent discovery of the Macclesfield Alphabet Book brought smiles to the lips of experts at the British Library. The 16th century 'model' or 'pattern' book was designed to display the skills of the illuminator for potential clients. (photos)

Cardinal Wolsey next in line for body search?

The body seach continues. This time the target is Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, who died in 1530, and was Archbishop of York and Lord Chancellor to Henry VIII. Wolsey died and was buried at Leicester Abbey. Now city councillor Ross Willmott wants to search for Wolsey's remains.

Gangrene claimed Giovanni de’ Medici

It was not a blow in combat that felled legendary Renaissance warrior Giovanni de’ Medici, but gangrene resulting from being hit by a cannon ball, in a battle in Lombardy on Nov. 25, 1526, according to a new study conducted after the exhumation of de’ Medici's body.

Little Moreton Hall "lifted from a fairy story"

A recent Wikipedia feature showcases Little Moreton Hall in Cheshire, England, a 16th century house which is, according to the national Trust,  "lifted straight from a fairy story, a gingerbread house."

Will ghosts help raise funds to save Wymering Manor?

16th century Wymering Manor, in Portsmouth, England, has had a varied history, from a family home to a residence for a Catholic religious order, but few dispute that it is now home to as many as 20 ghosts. The ghosts, however, may be the saving grace for the battered building which requires nearly UK£2m.

Historians argue over head of Henry IV

Historians continue to debate over the authenticity of a mummifed head found in the attic of a tax collector. Some believe it is the remains of "good King Henri" (Henry IV of France, murdered in 1610), while others believe the claim is "rubbish."

Hoard of Children's Toys Discovered

A stash of "street toys", dated from 1570-1630, was unearthed in an old stairwell of the Market Harborough parish church, England.

Canada's Oldest Shipwreck to be Replicated

A 16th-century Basque whaling galleon, the San Juan, will be re-constructed full-scale and seaworthy.

Arrest Warrant for Niccolo Machiavelli is Unearthed

The 1513 document calls for Machiavelli's arrest, to be proclaimed by the town crier.

Face to face

After centuries - and a world-changing divorce - Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon are back together, at least in London’s National Portrait Gallery. The portrait of a young Henry VIII and a newly-restored portrait of Catherine, both from the 1520s, now hang together in the gallery. (photo)

Historic High Heels for Men

Manly high heels date back centuries, worn by horsemen as well as powerful rulers.

Henry VIII's Wine Cellar

Henry VIII's perfectly preserved wine cellar is underneath Britain's Ministry of Defence building - floating in a subterranean chamber.

The Lime and Ice Project seeks answers about 16th century mill

Who built the 16th century water mill recently discovered in North York Moors National Park? Archaeologists are looking for the answer among official documents after unearthing the complex, complete with millstones and the outlines of watercourses.

Which Catherine? Tudor Portrait Re-identified

Wearing the "wrong clothes" helped experts decide that the portrait wasn't of Henry VIII's last wife but was of his first.

PBS offers new series on Shakespeare

On January 25, 2013, PBS stations will premiere Shakespeare Uncovered, a six-part series to be shown on three consecutive Friday evenings. The series will take a multi-faceted look at several plays, and it will include live performance segments.

Winchester Round Table re-created as watch

For the SCAdian who has everything: 18 K rose gold watch depicting the Round Table of King Arthur and his knights, in a limited saeries of 88. The watch, by Roger Dubuis, will be showcased at the 2013 Salon of Haute Horlogerie. (photos)

Elizabethan Embezzler and Shakespeare?

The autograph of Richard Stonley, an important figure in Elizabeth I's Treasury, appears in a newly-printed copy of one of Shakespeare's works in 1593.

Eastgate House to become museum

Admirers of Charles Dickens' Pickwick Papers (Westgate) and The Mystery of Edwin Drood (The Nun's House) will be gratified to know that Eastgate House in High Street in Rochester, Kent, England, is scheduled to be restored. (photo)

Own an early Bronzino for a mere US$18 million

On January 30, 2013, Christie’s Auction House will place on sale Agnolo Bronzino’s Portrait of a Young Man With a Book, "a relatively unknown panel depicting a man with a reddish beard in his 20s dressed in black, sitting at a table covered with green cloth." (photo)

Notation Knives

On display at the Victoria & Albert Museum is a rare "notation knife". Each side is engraved with the music and words for a blessing and a "thanks" for the meal.

Hidden Secrets of Tudor Portraits

Portraits of two Elizabethan courtiers, it seems, were painted over Catholic religious paintings.

Silver hoard linked to Kett's Rebellion

A small hoard of silver found in 2011 by metal detector enthusiasts Steven Clarkson and Mark Turner has been linked to Kett's Rebellion, the 1549 uprising against "rich robber barons who had stolen the common land, leaving the peasants to starve." (photo)

Remains of celebrated de' Medici condottieri exhumed

Gino Fornaciari, professor of forensic anthropology and director of the pathology Museum at the University of Pisa, leads a team of scientists who recently exhumed the body of Giovanni de' Medici, considered one of the greatest warriors of the age. The team plans to study the body to better understand Renaissance surgery.

Scone Palace archway restored

In September 2010, the historic, 16th-century arch leading to the grounds of Scone Palace in Scotland was destroyed when a delivery truck misjudged the size of the arch's opening. Now, after two years, the arch has been restored. (video)

The elite archers of the Mary Rose

Scientists from the University of Swansea have concluded that among those lost with the sinking of the Mary Rose, King Henry VIII's flagship, in 1545, were elite longbowmen. The conclusion was made after the study of over 100 skeletons found on the remains of the ship.

Henry VIII's Crown - An Update

A  new 11-minute video from Hampton Court Palaces provides details of the behind-the-scenes construction of the replica crown worn by Henry VIII.

Conservation of a Mary Rose hat

One of the many fascinating items found on the Mary Rose, the sunken fastship of King Henry VIII, is a knit hat. A recent photo from the Mary Rose's Facebook page (public) shows a conservator working on preservation of a hat. (photo)

Lacock Cup to be sacrificed to pay for church roof

Some parishoners of St Cyriac’s Church in the village of Lacock, Wiltshire, England are upset over the proposed auction of the town's cherished medieval chalice, the Lacock Cup, in order to finance repairs to the building's roof. (photo)

Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum to receive grant

The Flodden 1513 Ecomuseum project has received a grant of UK£900,000 to promote community archaeology and to "encourage dialogue about this historic battle and how it has impacted communities from both sides of the Borders."