1501 CE to 1600 CE

Face of "headless king" revealed

Four hundred years after his death, facial reconstructionists have revealed the face of France's 'Good King Henri IV' whose mummifed head is believed to have been discovered in an attic in 2008.

The science of discovery

Historians have long been fascinated by the creation of maps during the Age of Exploration. Of special interest are maps such as Waldseemüller and Ringmann's first map mentioning "America." The New York Times Science page looks at A Renaissance Globemaker’s Toolbox, a new book on the subject by John W. Hessler.

Pondering Ponce de León

The State of Florida is celebrating its 500th birthday, including debates about the exploration of Juan Ponce de León, who landed on the peninsula on April 2, 1513. St. Augustine is the traditional site of the landing, but historian Douglas Peck believes otherwise.

Cottage wall plate "discovery of a lifetime"

Dorset auctioneer Richard Bromell had an Antiques Roadshow moment recently when he was told that a plate, "found hanging on a makeshift wire frame in a Somerset cottage" was a 16th century original maiolica, bringing over £500,000 at auction. (photo)

Medieval burial shows love that outlasts death

Two skeletons in a grave in Romania have been found buried together holding hands. The skeletons were probably buried between 1450 and 1550.

Generous donors complete funding for the Mary Rose Museum

The final UK£35,000 needed to complete the Mary Rose Museum in Portsmouth, England's Historic Dockyard has been raised thanks to a plea by the Mary Rose Trust. Museum officials are "putting the finishing touches" on the museum's interior, including filling cases with artifacts receoved from Henry VIII's flagship. (photo)

Kent church: "Reputed to be the tomb of Richard Plantagenet"

A derelict church in Eastwell, Kent, England, may hold the final resting place of Richard Plantagenet, illegitimate son of King Richard III. A grave in St Mary's churchyard is marked with the inscription: "Reputed to be the tomb of Richard Plantagenet". Now scientists want to know the truth.

Shakespeare as educator

The works of Shakespeare have often been used to educate scholars throughout the world, but to historians in Titchfield near Southampton, England, the education may have taken place closer to home. Scholars there believes that William Shakespeare may have spent the years 1589-1592 working as a schoolmaster in the town.

Honoring Copernicus

Nicolaus Copernicus was honored recently when Google recognized the 450th anniversary of the scientists's birth with a Google Doodle. The Christian Science Monitor followed with a article which looks at the career of the Polish astronomer.

Heraldic badge found at Scottish battlefield

A heraldic badge showing the Scottish crown has been found at the site of the Battle of Flodden. The badge may have been worn by someone closely affiliated with King James IV.

Videos from Hampton Court Kitchens

Five short videos produced by Historic Royal Palaces explain some of the cookery aspects that are demonstrated each month at Hampton Court.

Tudor Armor-Piercing Cannonballs?

Cannonballs recovered from the Mary Rose wreck in England have been shown to contain iron cores, allowing the cannons to punch the shot through enemy vessels.

“It went beep, beep, beep. Then we dug into the mud"

Finding treasure with a metal detector is a hobby for all ages. Just ask three-year-old James Hyatt who, along with Dad and Grandpa, discovered an engraved gold reliquary locket from the early 16th century 8 inches beneath the Essex soil. (photo)

Documents from St. Augustine, Florida shed light on life in the New World

The earliest documents relating to the city of St. Augustine, Florida (USA) are being digitized for preservation. The documents cover the time period from 1594 to 1763 CE.

Macclesfield Alphabet Book showcases 16th century design

The recent discovery of the Macclesfield Alphabet Book brought smiles to the lips of experts at the British Library. The 16th century 'model' or 'pattern' book was designed to display the skills of the illuminator for potential clients. (photos)

Cardinal Wolsey next in line for body search?

The body seach continues. This time the target is Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, who died in 1530, and was Archbishop of York and Lord Chancellor to Henry VIII. Wolsey died and was buried at Leicester Abbey. Now city councillor Ross Willmott wants to search for Wolsey's remains.

Gangrene claimed Giovanni de’ Medici

It was not a blow in combat that felled legendary Renaissance warrior Giovanni de’ Medici, but gangrene resulting from being hit by a cannon ball, in a battle in Lombardy on Nov. 25, 1526, according to a new study conducted after the exhumation of de’ Medici's body.

Little Moreton Hall "lifted from a fairy story"

A recent Wikipedia feature showcases Little Moreton Hall in Cheshire, England, a 16th century house which is, according to the national Trust,  "lifted straight from a fairy story, a gingerbread house."

Will ghosts help raise funds to save Wymering Manor?

16th century Wymering Manor, in Portsmouth, England, has had a varied history, from a family home to a residence for a Catholic religious order, but few dispute that it is now home to as many as 20 ghosts. The ghosts, however, may be the saving grace for the battered building which requires nearly UK£2m.

Historians argue over head of Henry IV

Historians continue to debate over the authenticity of a mummifed head found in the attic of a tax collector. Some believe it is the remains of "good King Henri" (Henry IV of France, murdered in 1610), while others believe the claim is "rubbish."

Hoard of Children's Toys Discovered

A stash of "street toys", dated from 1570-1630, was unearthed in an old stairwell of the Market Harborough parish church, England.

Canada's Oldest Shipwreck to be Replicated

A 16th-century Basque whaling galleon, the San Juan, will be re-constructed full-scale and seaworthy.

Arrest Warrant for Niccolo Machiavelli is Unearthed

The 1513 document calls for Machiavelli's arrest, to be proclaimed by the town crier.

Face to face

After centuries - and a world-changing divorce - Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon are back together, at least in London’s National Portrait Gallery. The portrait of a young Henry VIII and a newly-restored portrait of Catherine, both from the 1520s, now hang together in the gallery. (photo)

Historic High Heels for Men

Manly high heels date back centuries, worn by horsemen as well as powerful rulers.

Henry VIII's Wine Cellar

Henry VIII's perfectly preserved wine cellar is underneath Britain's Ministry of Defence building - floating in a subterranean chamber.

The Lime and Ice Project seeks answers about 16th century mill

Who built the 16th century water mill recently discovered in North York Moors National Park? Archaeologists are looking for the answer among official documents after unearthing the complex, complete with millstones and the outlines of watercourses.

Which Catherine? Tudor Portrait Re-identified

Wearing the "wrong clothes" helped experts decide that the portrait wasn't of Henry VIII's last wife but was of his first.

PBS offers new series on Shakespeare

On January 25, 2013, PBS stations will premiere Shakespeare Uncovered, a six-part series to be shown on three consecutive Friday evenings. The series will take a multi-faceted look at several plays, and it will include live performance segments.

Winchester Round Table re-created as watch

For the SCAdian who has everything: 18 K rose gold watch depicting the Round Table of King Arthur and his knights, in a limited saeries of 88. The watch, by Roger Dubuis, will be showcased at the 2013 Salon of Haute Horlogerie. (photos)