1501 CE to 1600 CE

New exhibit on Renaissance luxury goods at the Folger

"Consuming Splendor: Luxury Goods in England, 1580-1680" will be on display at the Folger Shakespeare Library, in Washington, DC, through December 31.

Paleography

The National Archives has an online tutorial on Palaeography, the science of reading old handwriting.

Rare copy of the first printed Slavic Bible discovered in Germany

A belorussian Bible dating back to the time of the Reformation has been found in Germany.

European Festival Documentation Digitized

The British Library has made over 250 books documenting European festivals and cermonies from 1475 to 1700 available online.

Devotional Art Focuses on Pain of the Plague in Italy

New York Times reporter Holland Cotter reviews the exhibit "Hope and Healing: Painting in Italy in a Time of Plague, 1500-1800," which is on display at the Worcester (Mass.) Art Museum through September 25, 2005.

Elizabeth I to Tour the U.S.

Elizabeth I: Ruler and Legend, a traveling exhibition co-sponsored by the American Library Association and the National Endowment for the Humanities, will by touring the United States between October 2003 and March 2006.

Sources for Late Period Costuming

"Early Modern Notes," a costuming website for re-enactors, discusses sources for information on late period garb.

Unique 16th Century Russian Jewelry Found

A cache of 16th Century jewelry has been found in Kaliningrad and is said to be unlike any found previously in the area.

Wedding Jewel - Was Raphael Married?

A small pearl brooch in "La Fornarina" was the clue used by art historian Maurizio Bernardelli Curuz to suggest that Raphael and the woman long thought to be his mistress were actually secretly married.

Indian and Persian manuscript exhibit on display at The Walters

"Pearls of the Parrot of India" is on display at The Walters Art Museum, in Baltimore, Maryland, through September 11.

Shakespeare 2007: Arts Groups Plan Ambitious Citywide Festival in Washington, DC

The Washington Post reports on a citywide Shakespeare festival planned for 2007 in the U.S. capital, bringing together everyone from the Folger Shakespeare Library and Washington Shakespeare Company, to The Tiny Ninja Theatre.

Thatching Preserves Historic Grain Crops

An article in British Archaeology Magazine reports that medieval cereal crops have been discovered in thatched roofs in southern England.

Le Poulet Gauche

Le Poulet Gauche is virtual re-creation of a family-run tavern in 16th century France, with detailed "interviews" with the various family members and employees. The Le Poulet Gauche web site contains extensive information on how to develop a persona and how to fill in the "little things" that give your existing persona more reality and texture.

Dutch Skeletons Ruled Siege Soldiers

Anthropologists working with nine skeletons discovered in May 2004 in Amsterdam's Maastricht district believe that the remains are of members of the Staatse leger (State army) who were killed during the siege of the city.

Rose Theatre Site Casts Light on Elizabethan Life

Soil samples taken from the site of London's Elizabethan Rose Theatre reveals that the 16th century theatre experience was "a huge party."

Michaelangelo Self Portrait Discovered

A newly-discovered bas-relief may be the first known self-portrait of Renaissance artist Michelangelo.

Medici Child's Body Missing

Researchers working on the Medici crypt in Florence, Italy are puzzled. The tiny body discovered in the tomb of Filippino, the four-year-old son of Grand Duke Francesco I, was that of an infant.

Washington Times: Marlowe Book Looks at Life in Elizabethan England

Columnist Vincent D. Balitas reviews a new book on Elizabethan playwright Christopher Marlowe for the Washington Times.

Did Spanish Sailors Influence Fair Isle Knitters?

In Heritage & Culture reporter Brendan O'Brien looks at the history and influence of the remnants of the Spanish Armada shipwrecked by a storm in the Irish Sea.

Early Music Quartet Orlando Consort Reviewed

New York Times reviewer Allan Kozinn looks at medieval music quartet, the Orlando Consort, who appeared at Columbia University in a recent concert.

Da Vinci Fingerprint May Solve Mystery

The restoration of a renaissance painting, "The Adoration of the Christ Child," may have solved a mystery by revealing a fingerprint and stylistic touches that could tie the work to Leonardo Da Vinci.

Exhibit on horse armor at the Met

"The Armored Horse in Europe, 1480–1620" will be on display at the Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Gallery of the Metropolitan Museum of Art through January 15, 2006.

"Spain" on display at the Norton

"Spain in the Age of Exploration 1492-1819" will be on display at the Norton Museum of Art, in West Palm Beach, Florida, through May 1, 2005.

Historical group says "Richard III was innocent, okay?"

This article discusses the Richard III Society, "a quiet army" that is "fighting to clear his good name," and also mentions the De Vere Society and other such organizations.

Tudor Garden Found

Secret excavations have uncovered a rare Tudor garden which has lain hidden for over 500 years close to Carew Manor in Beddington.

Science Daily: Did Shakespeare have Syphilis?

A new study of the writings of William Shakespeare leads researchers to believe the bard may have had syphilis.

Leonardo da Vinci's Walled-Up Workshop Found

A laboratory once used by Leonardo da Vinci for his research into the natural sciences, but later sealed off by adjacent construction, has been found at a monastery next to the Basilica of the Santissima Annunziata, in Florence, Italy.

Prince Charles Offers Plants to 'Elizabethan' Garden

Prince Charles has offered some plants from his Highgrove estate for a proposed Elizabethan garden at a cottage in Cornwall, said to be the family home of Sir Francis Drake's first wife.

Chemist Discovers Secret of Renaissance Translucence

A chemist working for Washington's National Gallery of Art may have discovered the secret to the bright, translucent colors of European Renaissance paintings: ground glass.

Portrait of Thomas Howard Added to England's National Portrait Gallery

England's National Portrait Gallery has added a rare porait of Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk, to its collection. Howard was a powerful courtier during the reign of Elizabeth I.