1501 CE to 1600 CE

Italian Renaissance manuscripts on display at the Walters

"Dressed in Gold: Books of the Italian Renaissance" is on display at the Walters Museum of Art in Baltimore, Maryland, through January 8.

In Search of the Lost Colony

Archaeologists just won't give up. New plans are afoot to "scour" Roanoke Sound in search of clues to the fate of the Lost Colony.

"New" Da Vinci Works on Display in Italy

A pair of previously unseen paintings by Leonardo da Vinci are on display at Ancona's Mole Vanvitelliana Museum. The works were once believed to have been painted by one of the master's pupils.

Will the REAL Will Shakespeare Please Stand Up?

It appears that everyone but William Shakespeare wrote the playwright's work. The new candidate was an Elizabethan diplomat named Sir Henry Neville.

16th century manuscript from India featured in exhibit at the Met

"Pearls of the Parrot of India: The Emperor Akbar's Illustrated Khamsa, 1597–98" will be on display at the Florence and Herbert Irving Galleries for the Arts of South and Southeast Asia at the Metropolitan Museum of Art through March 12.

Mary Rose Anchor Raised

As work on the wreck of Henry VIII's flagship the Mary Rose continues, archaeologists announced that the anchor has been recovered.

Mary Rose Figurehead Found

Alex Hildred, Excavation Director for the Mary Rose project, believes that they may have discovered the tudor rose figurehead for the ship. The paddle-shaped, decorative piece of oak was uncovered recently in a planned attempt to raise one of the ship's main beams.

Plank from "Mary Rose" to be Raised

Maritime archaeologists have announced plans to raise an 11-meter timber from the bow of the warship Mary Rose.

New exhibit at the Getty on Titian and Alfonso d'Avalos

"Titian and the Commander: A Renaissance Artist and His Patron" will be on display at the Getty, in Los Angeles, through February 5.

English Heritage to Save Doddington Stronghouse

A 16th century stronghouse, built during Northumbria's border wars with the Scots, will be saved thanks to an UK£80,000 grant from English Heritage. The structure is located on a working farm near Doddington, England.

Historic Maps Stolen from British Library

Three 16th and 17th century maps have recently been stolen from bound volumes in the British Library. The theft is just the latest in a rash of crimes targeting libraries and museums.

New exhibit on Renaissance luxury goods at the Folger

"Consuming Splendor: Luxury Goods in England, 1580-1680" will be on display at the Folger Shakespeare Library, in Washington, DC, through December 31.

Paleography

The National Archives has an online tutorial on Palaeography, the science of reading old handwriting.

Rare copy of the first printed Slavic Bible discovered in Germany

A belorussian Bible dating back to the time of the Reformation has been found in Germany.

European Festival Documentation Digitized

The British Library has made over 250 books documenting European festivals and cermonies from 1475 to 1700 available online.

Devotional Art Focuses on Pain of the Plague in Italy

New York Times reporter Holland Cotter reviews the exhibit "Hope and Healing: Painting in Italy in a Time of Plague, 1500-1800," which is on display at the Worcester (Mass.) Art Museum through September 25, 2005.

Elizabeth I to Tour the U.S.

Elizabeth I: Ruler and Legend, a traveling exhibition co-sponsored by the American Library Association and the National Endowment for the Humanities, will by touring the United States between October 2003 and March 2006.

Sources for Late Period Costuming

"Early Modern Notes," a costuming website for re-enactors, discusses sources for information on late period garb.

Unique 16th Century Russian Jewelry Found

A cache of 16th Century jewelry has been found in Kaliningrad and is said to be unlike any found previously in the area.

Wedding Jewel - Was Raphael Married?

A small pearl brooch in "La Fornarina" was the clue used by art historian Maurizio Bernardelli Curuz to suggest that Raphael and the woman long thought to be his mistress were actually secretly married.

Indian and Persian manuscript exhibit on display at The Walters

"Pearls of the Parrot of India" is on display at The Walters Art Museum, in Baltimore, Maryland, through September 11.

Shakespeare 2007: Arts Groups Plan Ambitious Citywide Festival in Washington, DC

The Washington Post reports on a citywide Shakespeare festival planned for 2007 in the U.S. capital, bringing together everyone from the Folger Shakespeare Library and Washington Shakespeare Company, to The Tiny Ninja Theatre.

Thatching Preserves Historic Grain Crops

An article in British Archaeology Magazine reports that medieval cereal crops have been discovered in thatched roofs in southern England.

Le Poulet Gauche

Le Poulet Gauche is virtual re-creation of a family-run tavern in 16th century France, with detailed "interviews" with the various family members and employees. The Le Poulet Gauche web site contains extensive information on how to develop a persona and how to fill in the "little things" that give your existing persona more reality and texture.

Dutch Skeletons Ruled Siege Soldiers

Anthropologists working with nine skeletons discovered in May 2004 in Amsterdam's Maastricht district believe that the remains are of members of the Staatse leger (State army) who were killed during the siege of the city.

Rose Theatre Site Casts Light on Elizabethan Life

Soil samples taken from the site of London's Elizabethan Rose Theatre reveals that the 16th century theatre experience was "a huge party."

Michaelangelo Self Portrait Discovered

A newly-discovered bas-relief may be the first known self-portrait of Renaissance artist Michelangelo.

Medici Child's Body Missing

Researchers working on the Medici crypt in Florence, Italy are puzzled. The tiny body discovered in the tomb of Filippino, the four-year-old son of Grand Duke Francesco I, was that of an infant.

Washington Times: Marlowe Book Looks at Life in Elizabethan England

Columnist Vincent D. Balitas reviews a new book on Elizabethan playwright Christopher Marlowe for the Washington Times.

Did Spanish Sailors Influence Fair Isle Knitters?

In Heritage & Culture reporter Brendan O'Brien looks at the history and influence of the remnants of the Spanish Armada shipwrecked by a storm in the Irish Sea.