1501 CE to 1600 CE

Travel in Sardinia

Travel writer John Clarke writes about Sardinia. Along the way, visit ancient towns and medieval castles that "cling to mountain tops," the nuraghi (stone-built conical towers dating back to the 1500s), the neolithic necropolis of Bonorvo which dates back to 3500-2700 B.C. and the Spanish ruins of Burgos.

Today in the Middle Ages: May 1, 1576

On May 1, 1576, Stephen Báthory, former lord of Transylvania, was crowned king of Poland after his election by a majority of Polish nobles.

Folger Shakespeare Library Worth the Trip

Julienne fille Gaspard of the Kingdom of Atlantia discusses a recent visit to the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington D.C.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 28, 1521

The final defeat of the Aztec empire began when Hernan Cortes laid siege to the capital city of Tenochtitlan on April 28, 1521.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 26, 1573

Marie de'Medici, Queen of France, was born on April 26, 1573.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 23, 1564

The most famous writer in the English language, William Shakespeare, was born on April 23, 1564.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 21, 1509

Henry VII of England, the Tudor victor in the Wars of the Roses, died on April 21, 1509.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 17, 1521

Already excommunicated, Martin Luther appeared before the Emperor on April 17, 1521 at Worms to answer for his views.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 11, 1554

Sir Thomas Wyatt the Younger was executed on April 11, 1554, for leading a rebellion against Queen Mary Tudor of England, known to history as "Bloody Mary."

Today in the Middle Ages: April 10, 1512

King James V of Scotland was born on April 10, 1512. He was the son of James IV of Scotland and Margaret Tudor, the sister of King Henry VIII.

Today in the Middle Ages: April 7, 1506

Today is the 500th anniversary of the birth of St. Francis Xavier. The Spanish-born missionary studied at the University of Paris and was one of the seven priests who joined Ignatius Loyola to found the Jesuit order.

Naval Construction Site Yields 16th Century Shipwreck

The Associated Press reports that a construction crew working at Pensacola's Naval Air Station in Florida has discovered a 16th century Spanish ship buried in the sand.

April Fools or April Fish?

Wonder about the origins of the calendar's silliest holiday? What the heck was a "Poisson d’Avril?" Novopress.info has the story on its website.

Historian says Australia not discovered by the Portuguese

Recent theories have led to speculation that Portuguese mariner Cristovao de Mendonca may have reached Australia in the 16th century, but not so, according to historian Michael Pearson.

Bird Paintings of Pierre Eskrich Rediscovered

Several albums of paintings of birds dating to the 16th century have been "rediscovered" by Roberta J.M. Olson, art curator for the New York Historical Society. The works were painted by French artist Pierre Eskrich, considered to be the inspiration for James Audubon.

16th Century Spanish Patterns Online

The Folger Shakespeare Library has posted digitized versions of 16th century Spanish patterns on its website.

Columbus mystery nearly solved 500 yrs after death

Debate about origins and final resting place of Columbus has raged for over a century, with historians questioning the traditional theory that he hails from Genoa, Italy. Some say he was a Spanish Jew, a Greek, a Basque or Portuguese.

Cate Blanchett back as Elizabeth in "The Golden Age"

Cate Blanchett is to reprise her role as Elizabeth I, in a new movie called The Golden Age. It is set 15 years after the last movie and will touch on her relationship with Mary, Queen of Scots and end just before the battle with the Spanish Armada.

Shakespearean Insult Generator

Thou villainous doghearted gudgeon! Chris Seidel has created an insult generator based on the original Shakespeare Insult Kit. Have fun!

Vandals Hit 15th Century Baptistry

Vandals (modern-day) attacked the 15th century baptistry at Madron over the past weekend, causing damage to the structure of the ancient building just four months after major restoration began.

Sterling Renaissance Festival to Hold Auditions

David Salley reports that the Sterling Renaissance Festival (near Syracuse, New York), will be holding auditions throughout the next month for its interactive improvisational troupe, "The Bless the Mark Players."

Aztec Mural Documents Spanish Conquest

A recently unearthed Aztec mural, painted shortly after the Spanish conquest, combines Aztec mythology with Christian symbols including a large black and white cross.

Tudor Bananas

Are bananas period? Apparently so, according to the recent discovery of a 500-year-old banana skin in London. The development shatters previously-held beliefs that the banana first came to Britain in 1633.

Tudor Effigies Database

Dr Jane Malcolm-Davies at the Textile Conservation Centre at Winchester School of Art, University of Southampton, has created a database for costumers using Tudor effigies.

Pearson's Renaissance Shoppe

Renaissance clothing, costumes and accessories. Their authentic renaissance line includes wench costumes, twill bodices, Elizabethan clothes, princess gowns and dresses.

Gold Ring Provides Link Between British and New World

A gold ring, discovered by in 1998 by archaeologist David S. Phelps, may provide evidence of the contact between British explorers and Native Americans in the late 16th century.

Renaissance Allegories on Display at the Frick

A pair of allegorical paintings by Renaissance artist Paolo Veronese will be the centerpiece of Veronese's Allegories: Virtue, Love and Exploration in Renaissance Venice, a small exhibit at the Frick Gallery in New York City beginning April 11, 2006.

Medieval Cemetery Found in Leicester

A construction company, making way for a new shopping mall, has discovered a large, medieval cemetery near the English city of Leicester. The cemetery appears to have been in use from the 12th through 16th centuries.

16th Century Tudor Chapel Found

A Tudor chapel, originally built by Henry VII, has been discovered at the Old Royal Naval College in Greenwich, England. The original vault has been found completely intact.

Time changes modern human's face

Modern people possess less prominent features but higher foreheads than our medieval ancestors, according to research on the changes to the shape of the human skull over the past 650 years.