1501 CE to 1600 CE

Medici mystery reinvestigated

A new study of the deaths of Francesco de' Medici and his wife Bianca Cappello seems to suggest that the couple died of acute arsenic poisoning rather than from malaria as is generally believed.

15th century Italian Clothing

I have searched all over the internet for information on 15 century italian dress and have found very little info. does anyone have any suggested recources for such a search?

Amsterdam Exhibit Recreates Ottoman Bazaar

A medieval church in Amsterdam is housing a walk-though exhibition that captures "all facets of daily life in Istanbul between the 15th and 20th century."

Today in the Middle Ages: December 7, 1539

On December 7, 1539, Martin Luther granted Philip, Landgrave of Hesse a confessor's dispensation to marry a second wife, although his first wife was still living and not divorced. Christine of Saxony, described as "unattractive and sickly," apparently favored her husband's plan to marry again.

Navigating 16th Century London

Dr. Janelle Jenstad of the University of Victoria in British Columbia has created an interactive map of 16th century London complete with the "theatres and landmarks of Shakespeare's time."

One Book, One Barony: Lyondemere Reads One Book

Her Excellency Angelina Nicollete de Beaumont, Baroness of Lyondemere, Caid, has issued a "One Book, One Barony" challenge to the populous of Lyondemere, an SCA analog to the "One Book, One Community" program started in 1998 to get people interested in reading and create a community wide book club.

Da Vinci's Mom May have been Middle Eastern

Analysis of a fingerprint left by Leonardo Da Vinci suggests the prototypical Renaissance man may have been the son of a Middle East-born slave woman.

Close Up: the Unicorn Tapestries

The Metropolitan Museum of Art has provided an online source for viewing their famous Unicorn Tapestries. The website invites visitors to zoom in for close up details of the designs.

Jews in the Court of Tudor England?

Roger Prior, a Shakespearean scholar, is convinced that many of the musicians of the Tudor Court, including the Bard's own "Dark Lady," may have been Separdic Jews.

Seeking Answers to Columbus Riddles

"Genovese nobleman or Catalan pirate? Adventurous explorer or greedy tyrant? What if the Italian gentleman who discovered America was in fact a brutal torturer and slave owner? And what if he wasn't even Italian?" Two Spanish scholars hope to answer some of the long-debated questions about Christopher Columbus using newly obtained evidence.

Hans Holbein at the V&A

Artist Hans Holbein, best known for his portraits of royal personages of the Tudor court, is the subject of a new exhibit at London's Victoria and Albert Museum. The large collection of paintings will be on display 28 September 2006 through 7 January 2007.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 15, 1518

On October 15, 1518, Martin Luther was summoned before a Papal legate in Augsburg, Germany, but refused to recant his 95 Theses.

Kunsthistorisches Museum Vienna Exhibits 'Bellini, Giorgione, Titian'

Soon a new special exhibition will be on display at the Kunsthistorisches Museum in Vienna. BELLINI, GIORGIONE, TITIAN and the Renaissance of the Venetian Painting begins at October 17, 2006 and runs until January 7, 2007.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 9, 1547

Miguel de Cervantes, creator of Don Quixote and spiritual ancestor of thousands of SCAdians, was born on October 9, 1547. His Wikipedia entry says "he lived an unsettled life of hardship and adventure."

Today in the Middle Ages: October 7, 1543

Hans Holbein the Younger, the northern Renaissance portraitist who painted many Tudor notables including Henry VIII and at least two of his wives, died on October 7, 1543.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 6, 1536

William Tyndale, Bible translator and Protestant scholar, was executed for heresy on October 6, 1536. He was condemned to burn at the stake, but was mercifully strangled first and his body burned after death.

Researchers seek sunken Spanish colony ship

In 1526, Luis Vasquez de Ayllon attempted to establish a Spanish colony on the coast of what is now the state of Georgia. He ran his vessel aground off the South Carolina coast, and it all began to go horribly wrong. Now researchers are looking for the wrecked flagship of the colony expedition.

New exhibit on Renaissance Italy at the V&A

"At Home in Renaissance Italy," on display at London's Victoria & Albert Museum through January 7, reveals the Renaissance interior's central role in the flourishing of Italian art and culture by providing an innovative three-dimensional view of the Italian Renaissance home, presented as object-filled spaces that bring the period to life.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 4, 1568

Elisabeth de Valois, third of the four wives of Philip II of Spain, died on October 4, 1568. She had originally been betrothed to his son but married the father as part of a peace settlement.

Renaissance and Early Modern Festival Books Now Online

View 253 digitised Renaissance festival books (selected from over 2,000 in the British Library's collection) that describe the magnificent festivals and ceremonies that took place in Europe between 1475 and 1700.

Today in the Middle Ages: October 2, 1535

On October 2, during his second voyage to North America, Jacques Cartier came to a town which he renamed "Montreal."

Today in the Middle Ages: September 29, 1513

Vasco Núñez de Balboa became the first European to see the Pacific Ocean on September 29, 1513.

Today in the Middle Ages: September 27, 1540

The Pope issued a bull establishing Ignatius Loyola's new Society of Jesus (the Jesuit order) on September 24, 1540. The Society was and still is answerable directly to the Pope himself.

New exhibit on Leonardo da Vinci opens at the V&A

"Leonardo da Vinci: Experience, Experiment and Design," a new exhibition exploring how Leonardo da Vinci thought on paper, is on display at London's Victoria and Albert Museum through January 7.

Canada's First French Settlement Found

Archaeologists have solved a great mystery of Canadian history: the location of Jacques Cartier's 1541 settlement Fort Charlesbourg-Royal. The recent discovery of a 465-year-old pottery shard has placed the site near present day Quebec City.

Search on for Florida's First Settlement

Don Tristan de Luna y Arellano is recognized as the founder of the first European settlement in Florida which was established near Pensacola in 1559. The settlement was destroyed by a hurricane two years later. Now, with the 450th anniversary approaching, archaeologists are searching for the site.

"Image of Irelande" Depicts 16th Century Irish Life

Plates from John Derrick's 1581 book The Image of Irelande are available on the Edinburgh University website. The woodcuts show examples of Irish costume of the time.

Gout may have Forced Abducation of Charles V

Medical researchers working with the 500-year-old pinky of Emperor Charles V of Spain report that the mummified finger shows signs of debilitating gout which would have caused great pain. Charles V abdicated in favor of his brother at the age of 56.

Today in the Middle Ages: August 28, 1549

On August 28, 1549, the Baron d'Aguerre and the Lord of Fendilles fought a duel with bastard swords after quarreling in the King's chamber.

Possible Benedictine Guesthouse Found Under Pub

Archaeologists believe they have unearthed a medieval Benedictine hostelry beneath a pub near Byland Abbey near Coxwold.